Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, focusing primarily on wines that are either kosher or Israeli.

Sommolier 2011

User avatar
User

Avi Hein

Rank

Ultra geek

Posts

268

Joined

Sat Jul 12, 2008 4:23 pm

Location

Israel

Sommolier 2011

by Avi Hein » Mon Nov 07, 2011 4:31 pm

Sommolier 2011 is tonight and tomorrow at Heichel Nokia, near Yad Eliyahu in Tel Aviv.

Lots of interesting wines from top end Yarden, Clos de Gat, Vitkin, Saslove, Gat Shomron, Barkan's new series, etc.

Thoughts? Reactions?
It's Israeli Wine 2.0 - HaKerem: The Israeli Wine Blog - http://www.israeli-wine.org
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/avihein - @avihein & http://www.twitter.com/israelwines - @israelwines
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/israelwine
User avatar
User

Gabriel Geller

Rank

'So-called' wine expert

Posts

1513

Joined

Tue Nov 24, 2009 4:46 pm

Location

Jerusalem, Israel

Re: Sommelier 2011

by Gabriel Geller » Mon Nov 07, 2011 5:00 pm

In my hands, the new Ultimate Rogov's Guide to Israeli wines 2012. Ultimate... makes me sad... :(

Just back from a 6-hour wine tasting at Sommelier 2011 at the Nokia Stadium in Tel Aviv. Met there a few forumites, among them YossieH and David Raccah. Guys, it was a great pleasure to finally meet you!

Wow, what an event. So many wineries, so many great wines, showing that not only 2008 was an exceptional vintage in Israel being not only "Kedushat Shvi'it" (pureness of the seventh year) but "brachat shvi'it" (the blessed seventh year's) but that 2009 and 2010 are both very promising years for most Israeli wineries.

I've attended special tastings at Recanati's VIP room where Gil Schatzberg the head winemaker gave speeches about the winery's new direction, as well as the history of Kerem Ba'al where it's Carignan Reserve is from, as well as a great tasting of the new Syrah-Viognier Reserve which was quite impressive. Of course sipping a bit from the Special Reserve 2008 was a treat as always! I've finally tasted the GHW Yarden 2T 2008, not so different but great, full bodied showing roasted Mediterranean herbs, plums, black fruit and hints of tobacco.

And oh my dears, the GHW Cabernet Sauvignon Elrom 2008. Oh Lord, probably not to drink before 2014 but incredible... Cabernet Sauvignon as it should be! So dark, so intense, so powerful! Dark fruits, essentialy blackberries and cherries, some bakers chocolate on the finish, but hard to figure it all out, needs really some more time to become approachable.
The Gamla Syrah 2009 was something, a bargain, of course if you can find it for less than the Yarden! The Yarden Syrah Tel Fares was also not to be missed!

Domaine Ventura keeps improving, same with Netofa, their Tinto was great! Tanya, Gat Shomron... and Tishbi! Tishbi are releasing single vineyards wines including a Malbec which are more than worth checking out!

But so many wines, so many wineries. Not to mention cheese, jams, breads... I had a terrific time! For those in Israel who were hesitating to check it out, I more than highly recommend it! :wink:

Best,

GG
Wine Education Manager with Royal Wine Corp. - Founder of KWSE (Kosher Wine: Sharing & Experiences) - http://facebook.com/groups/kosherwinesh ... periences/
no avatar
User

Alexander F

Rank

Ultra geek

Posts

465

Joined

Sun May 02, 2010 6:44 am

Location

Israel

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Alexander F » Wed Nov 09, 2011 7:56 am

I like the new place. Wasn't too crowded or perhaps that's because I left at 6pm. Indeed many wineries, new wines and wineries I've not heard of before. The importers disappointed with a selection of cheap to medium priced wines. While they did have some interesting wines, it is still not what I expected.
Ch.Golan Syrah was great, Saslove CS Reserve was too young and was tasted too late to fully appreciate. Yarden SV's selection was surprisingly minimal compared to previous years, yet El Rom had really impressed me even after more than 50 wines tasted.The 2T was interesting. I really enjoyed a short chat with the representative of William Fevre and Bouchard and equally enjoyed the quality of their wines. Domaine Ventura improved in quality, which is good, but there is still room for improvement. Tasted Domain Netofa Latour for the first time, it is indeed as Rogov noted reminds more of south Rhone than Israeli wine, however it is not impressive as Chateauneuf-du-Pape wines. I'll keep a note to re-taste the whole line-up at the next Sommelier next year.
It was a great evening and with so many wines presented, the best is to attend both days, which unfortunately I never manage.
no avatar
User

Isaac Chavel

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

685

Joined

Tue Jul 15, 2008 7:54 am

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Isaac Chavel » Wed Nov 09, 2011 8:45 am

Tasted Domain Netofa Latour for the first time, it is indeed as Rogov noted reminds more of south Rhone than Israeli wine


Is this a negative? or a positive, claiming a distinctive Mediterannean character?
no avatar
User

Alexander F

Rank

Ultra geek

Posts

465

Joined

Sun May 02, 2010 6:44 am

Location

Israel

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Alexander F » Wed Nov 09, 2011 10:51 am

This is not a negative, more positive I'd say, it is different. The tannins feeling was not as sweet as in many local wines. It did not show the old world scents of forest floor, mushrooms and rot though and I think it had some sharp edges that need time. At that particular tasting, I wouldn't give it 90points, but unfortunately, my palate was quite tired by that time, so hopefully I'll get to taste it again. Interestingly, I came to this conclusion before reading Rogov's notes. Also, if you read Hebrew see this this as well: http://www.wines-israel.co.il/apage/104427.php
They also point to its Rhone character.
no avatar
User

Yossie Horwitz

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

803

Joined

Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:27 pm

Location

NYC

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Yossie Horwitz » Wed Nov 09, 2011 2:59 pm

This was my first time attending the event so I can't comment on the relative success of the change in venue. I attended the first day of the event and thought it was great. For the first 5 hours or so, the place was relatively empty, allowing for a good tasting environment and the ability to chat with most of the winemakers while tasting the wines - always a fun experience. Most of the wineries had additional space up top in addition to their "regular" booths were some of the more interesting and better wines were being poured. I found this to be an odd practice (at least during the early, more "trade" oriented hours of the event) as, unless you knew someone or thought to ask, you could miss out on some of the more interesting wines.

There were a lot of new and interesting wineries with some good stuff including Gat Shomron which had two interesting "Icewine"-style wines, one from Viognier and one from Gewurztraminer, Ramot Naftaly and the full lineup of newly kosher wines from Saslove and Tulip. A bunch of new wines were unveiled including Tishbi's single vineyard Malbec and Barkan's new series of blends - Assemblage. Other interesting wines included Mia Luche (made by Recanati's cellar master Kobi Arbiv), Netofa's Tinto (I posted my notes on another topic), GHW's Gamla Syrah and Alexander's Amorolo (an Amarone "inspired" wine). I was happy to see that Gvaot continues to improve their quality and consistency (if not their pricing) and the 2009 Masada was amazing. I enjoyed Livni's new wines and was happy to see that many wineries are planning new and exciting things.

In general, I felt that the quality across the board had improved with most wineries making passable to good wines. The flip side is that, with a few notable exceptions, I didn't find too many different wines at the exhibition (many wineries were not showing including Tzora, Ella Valley and Dalton), leading to some concern about the future of the industry, especially without the vigorous promotional pushing previously provided by Rogov (more on that in a coming newsletter). The good news is that more and more small wineries are going kosher including, in addition to those listed above, Yaffo, Katz, and Eyal among others, providing more opportunity to taste some of those small/tiny wine producers.
Last edited by Yossie Horwitz on Mon Nov 14, 2011 10:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
Sign up for my weekly newsletter on wines, wineries & other oenophilic goodies at http://www.yossiescorkboard.com
User avatar
User

David Raccah

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

2436

Joined

Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:18 am

Location

Bay Area, CA

Re: Sommolier 2011

by David Raccah » Wed Nov 09, 2011 3:24 pm

Hello Yossie,

I did not see Katz and Eyal - where were they?

David
Checkout http://www.kosherwinemusings.com for my blogs on the world of kosher wines and follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/kosherwinemuse.
no avatar
User

Pinchas L

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

862

Joined

Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:04 pm

Location

Brooklyn, NY

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Pinchas L » Wed Nov 09, 2011 3:54 pm

Yossie H wrote:In general, I felt that the quality across the board had improved with most wineries making passable to good wines. The flip side is that, with a few notable exceptions, I didn't find too many different wines at the exhibition (many wineries were not showing including Tzora, Ella Valley and Dalton) leading to some concern about the future of the industry, especially without the vigorous promotional pushing previously provided by Rogov (more on that in a coming newsletter). The good news is that more and more small wineries are going kosher including, in addition to those listed above, Yaffo, Katz, and Eyal among others, providing more opportunity to taste some of those small/tiny wine producers.


Hi Yossie,

While I don't know the reasons driving Tzora's, Dalton's, and Ella Valley's decision not to exhibit at Sommolier, I don't think it is a reason for concern. I am guessing that one of the reasons Tzora and Ella Valley didn't attend Sommelier, is that they put together a regional exhibition of Judean district wineries, which might be competing with Sommolier.

There are some great things going on at Tzora, such as their work with wine consultant Jean-Claude Berrouet, formerly winemaker at Petrus and Dominus, as well as getting Michael Skurnik to become their importer in the states. It seems that they are on the verge of breaking into the general market as one of the great representatives of Israeli wine, and are breaking out of the pattern so many other Israeli wineries adopted; relying on Royal to distribute their wines amongst the various Jewish wine outlets. As for Dalton, they have a savvy businessman at the helm, Alex Haruni, and I would trust his decisions. Their recent expansion of the Alma series is a great success.

I also believe that you are overstating Rogov's impact on getting Israeli wines into new markets. His high praise for Israeli wines was no substitute for the hard work on the ground the marketing teams of many Israeli wineries are putting in to break into new markets.

As for new wineries going kosher, I would like to know when Gabi Sadan at Shvo goes kosher.

Best,
-> Pinchas
no avatar
User

Yossie Horwitz

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

803

Joined

Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:27 pm

Location

NYC

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Yossie Horwitz » Wed Nov 09, 2011 4:55 pm

David - Eyal & Katz were not at Sommelier. My last sentence was more of a general one.

Pinchas - I think you misunderstood my point, both on the lack of attendance and Rogov's impact. My concern is that, despite 100s of wines, a lot of the wine I tasted at Sommelier was more of the same "internationalized" wines Israel has been making for years our of the classic Bordeaux varietals, lacking in any terroir or regional specialty and creativity which is going to make selling such wines abroad increasingly difficult as the shelves get more and more crowded with overly priced wines. Given that, marketing is playing an ever increasingly important role in standing out. Rogov's scores were a huge part of selling these wines and without them, I think the industry is in for some tough times. Tzora is actually one of the only kosher wineries not strictly (or even primarily) catering to the kosher crowd which, I [hope and] believe will assist them in standing out and marketing thier wines, in which renewed investment is being made and we should be seeing many new and great wines from them soon.

My point on the missing wineries was that those I listed DO make some "different" wines, but they weren't exhibiting at Sommelier - I have no concern about this. After talking to many different winemakers, winery owners and management over the past 10 days (including Alex), I got the impression that the lack of attendance at Sommelier (and many other wine shows/festivals) was a simple business decision - insufficient "return" on the necessary investment to attend such events (primarily due to the large number of general public who aren't really interested in the wines but rather in drinking/getting drunk [which also plays a big part in the better wines only being poured for VIPs, etc. and being kept under the table and/or in the private rooms]). Much of this crowd was in attendance at Sommelier from around 7:00 PM on.
Sign up for my weekly newsletter on wines, wineries & other oenophilic goodies at http://www.yossiescorkboard.com
no avatar
User

Pinchas L

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

862

Joined

Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:04 pm

Location

Brooklyn, NY

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Pinchas L » Wed Nov 09, 2011 5:52 pm

Yossie H wrote:Pinchas - I think you misunderstood my point, both on the lack of attendance and Rogov's impact. My concern is that, despite 100s of wines, a lot of the wine I tasted at Sommelier was more of the same "internationalized" wines Israel has been making for years our of the classic Bordeaux varietals, lacking in any terroir or regional specialty and creativity which is going to make selling such wines abroad increasingly difficult as the shelves get more and more crowded with overly priced wines. Given that, marketing is playing an ever increasingly important role in standing out. Rogov's scores were a huge part of selling these wines and without them, I think the industry is in for some tough times. Tzora is actually one of the only kosher wineries not strictly (or even primarily) catering to the kosher crowd which, I [hope and] believe will assist them in standing out and marketing thier wines, in which renewed investment is being made and we should be seeing many new and great wines from them soon.


Hi Yossie,

You are somehow linking the lack of specificity in Israeli wines with the absence of Rogov's advocacy as a cause for concern, as if Rogov's presence could have helped uninspiring Israeli wines make it on the grand stage. I am countering by saying that as instrumental as Rogov was in bringing Israeli wine's to the attention of respected critics, he was unable to assist Israeli wines get shelf space alongside general wines. A Israeli Cabarnet Franc would not share shelf space with other Cabernet Franc, but would find its place in the Kosher section. Personally, I am of the opinion that Rogov inflated scores of Israeli wines, causing winemakers to ask ridiculous prices, exasperating the problem. While you might be partially correct in stating that Rogov's scores helped sell wines, it is only within the confines of the kosher market that it worked, and that is attributable to the fact that the kosher market has a captive audience, the kosher consumer who will not shop elsewhere. The overpriced internationalized Israeli wine cannot compete without a handicap, just as a Jewish golfer cannot compete without a handicap, starting on the 9th hole on an eighteen hole course, and that handicap comes in the form of the captive kosher consumer who does not know better, gullible and culpable to the hyperbole thrown their way.

As I've pointed out, the winemakers are shortchanging themselves by choosing Royal as their distribution partner. Royal is the easy choice, but it will not help any Israeli wine break into the general market for many reasons, not the least of which is that that approach will bite into their profits. It is only when Israeli wineries will in earnest try to compete in the general market, with distributors who understand what it takes to do so successfully, will you see your concerns addressed: the development of wines with character and a reasonable pricing scheme.

Best,
-> Pinchas
no avatar
User

Yossie Horwitz

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

803

Joined

Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:27 pm

Location

NYC

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Yossie Horwitz » Wed Nov 09, 2011 6:26 pm

Personally, I am of the opinion that Rogov inflated scores of Israeli wines, causing winemakers to ask ridiculous prices, exasperating the problem.


This I agree with...

As I've pointed out, the winemakers are shortchanging themselves by choosing Royal as their distribution partner. Royal is the easy choice, but it will not help any Israeli wine break into the general market for many reasons, not the least of which is that that approach will bite into their profits.


While Royal may not be the best choice for all wineries, they certainly do well by some of them.
Sign up for my weekly newsletter on wines, wineries & other oenophilic goodies at http://www.yossiescorkboard.com
no avatar
User

Pinchas L

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

862

Joined

Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:04 pm

Location

Brooklyn, NY

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Pinchas L » Wed Nov 09, 2011 6:38 pm

Yossie H wrote:
As I've pointed out, the winemakers are shortchanging themselves by choosing Royal as their distribution partner. Royal is the easy choice, but it will not help any Israeli wine break into the general market for many reasons, not the least of which is that that approach will bite into their profits.


While Royal may not be the best choice for all wineries, they certainly do well by some of them.


Yossie,

While they might do well for some wineries, my point is that they are not well suited for any winery wanting to break into the general market. And for those who are satisfied making wines for the kosher market there is no need to develop anything other then in an internationalized style that scores high with critics.

-> Pinchas
no avatar
User

Yossie Horwitz

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

803

Joined

Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:27 pm

Location

NYC

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Yossie Horwitz » Wed Nov 09, 2011 6:47 pm

With all due respect to those other distributors, I don't think any Israeli winery has had any notable success breaking into the general market other than Castel (represented by Royal) and many wineries that are currently represented by non-kosher specific distributors are suffering from lack of exposure, including Ella Valley and Recanati. Wanting to break into the general market doesn't mean disregarding the obvious target market of kosher consumers.

I agree that the need to expand into the general market is critical for the Israeli wine industry but the wines have to be special first. While the mass market kosher wine consumer may not be that knowledgeable [yet], as with many other instances, people are gaining knowledge and appreciation and will, hopefully soon, require more sophisticated, elegant and food-friendly wines, forcing the wineries to stop taking advantage of the gullible consumer.
Sign up for my weekly newsletter on wines, wineries & other oenophilic goodies at http://www.yossiescorkboard.com
no avatar
User

Pinchas L

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

862

Joined

Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:04 pm

Location

Brooklyn, NY

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Pinchas L » Wed Nov 09, 2011 10:55 pm

Yossie,

With all due respect to those other distributors, I don't think any Israeli winery has had any notable success breaking into the general market other than Castel (represented by Royal) and many wineries that are currently represented by non-kosher specific distributors are suffering from lack of exposure, including Ella Valley and Recanati. Wanting to break into the general market doesn't mean disregarding the obvious target market of kosher consumers.


Of course they should not disregard the obvious target market, picking off the low hanging fruit, but for them to simply jump on Royal's bandwagon is to take the easy way out, with long lasting ramifications to their future success. The reasons not to use Royal are plenty, with the most obvious being their conflict of interest; with a large lineup of wines that are theirs competing with the wines they import and distribute for shelf space, and their ability to manipulate pricing to favor the brands they prefer. Royal's position in the market is due in some measure to circumstance, being at the right place at the right time, and in some respect to their strong-arming tactics, bordering on the illegal, they use to retain their hegemony, but owes very little to honest, creative marketing and organizational skill on their part. My low regard for that organization not withstanding, I hope that with Golan Heights Winery breaking away from Royal's grip the conditions exist for the creation of an alternative distribution channel that will amass a respectable portfolio of top flight Israeli wineries with the likes of GHW, Recanati, Ella Valley etcetera, possesing enough muscle so that they will be willing and able to challenge Royal, offering retail outlets plenty in return for standing up to Royal's dictates. The consumer has much to gain from such competition.

I agree that the need to expand into the general market is critical for the Israeli wine industry but the wines have to be special first. While the mass market kosher wine consumer may not be that knowledgeable [yet], as with many other instances, people are gaining knowledge and appreciation and will, hopefully soon, require more sophisticated, elegant and food-friendly wines, forcing the wineries to stop taking advantage of the gullible consumer.


While I agree that kosher wine consumers are gaining knowledge and experience, so long as they restrict themselves to kosher wine alone, they will forever lack the points of reference necessary to determine when they are being taken advange of, and whether or not the wines they consume are unique, or offering good value for their money.

Best,
-> Pinchas
User avatar
User

Gabriel Geller

Rank

'So-called' wine expert

Posts

1513

Joined

Tue Nov 24, 2009 4:46 pm

Location

Jerusalem, Israel

Re: Sommelier 2011

by Gabriel Geller » Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:21 am

Pinchas and Yossie,

This a fascinating discussion!

I'm consulting for one of the leading importer-distributor of fine wines in Switzerland, selling to the general market the finest wines from France, Spain, Italy, California etc with sales of over $ 100 million/year. Being Jewish, a few years ago he started selling a small selection of Israeli wines at very reasonable prices (e.g. $ 34/btl for GHW Yarden CS 2005) with no intention on making profits as a service to the local Jewish community. We're now in 2011 and he's already selling about 40.000 bottles/year of GHW and Barkan (Yarden CS, Gamla and Barkan Classic series)while over 70% of that being sold to non-jewish customers (!) who are knowledgeable, trust his expertise and always willing to try new things. Most became regular buyers of his Israeli wines and the figures keep increasing and that's why he asked me to look out for new products and expand his Israeli selection as he now understands clearly the potential. I wish I could help him even more as well as others in spreading out the word to the world. I'm sick and tired of the articles always only mentioning that Israeli wine is no longer like the kosher Manischewitz coughing-syrup, meaning they're always referring to Israeli wine as targeting the kosher market and not as a potential "mass" product. We need more press coverage describing Israel as making world-class wines, just same as it's the case for Chile, Australia or Argentina.

Best,

GG
Wine Education Manager with Royal Wine Corp. - Founder of KWSE (Kosher Wine: Sharing & Experiences) - http://facebook.com/groups/kosherwinesh ... periences/
User avatar
User

David Raccah

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

2436

Joined

Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:18 am

Location

Bay Area, CA

Re: Sommolier 2011

by David Raccah » Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:21 am

I am going to move this back to Sommelier and off this discussion, mostly because that is what the thread is about and also, because in the long run, it is not our problem. If the wineries want to charge a lot, because they believe - they need it - so be it. I overheard a conversation, in Hebrew, at the Gvaot booth, between the father (owner), and a buyer, they were discussing the high prices. The father said it simply, I take the amount of wine we make now, and divide it by our costs and that gives me our prices. Others at our size can sell it cheaper, good for them, but we cannot survive if we did. Again - time will tell.

Now, on to the show - literally - WOW! Went both days, spat some 180 wines, and they were great! Most of the wines were B++ or higher, though I only drank the good stuff or the the small wineries. Here are the winners:

1) The Amarone from Alexander - WOW!
2) 2009 Adir wines , especially the Shiraz (one of the best at the show)
3) Tulip's White Franc - unique and enjoyable
4) DO NOT LAUGH - 2009 Or Haganuz keren Shamai and the 2009 Keren Nemera - Both very fine Cabernets, the rest of the Or Haganuz, B to B+ at best
5) There were a BUNCH of wines that were exhibiting roasted met or rich espresso flavors - which are fun, but man are the tannins getting OUT OF CONTROL. We are not talking about wine tannins here, we are talking about oak tannin. You can tell the difference when the mouth puckers to a point of mouth drying - Livni and Tanya were mega tannin and mega oak - NO CEDAR. Anyway, fun but out of control, over time the wines will calm down. I hope that wineries will learn that this is a bit too much, like they have learnt that oak is not a spice for Chardonnays.
6) 2007 Sapphire form Bimyamina - Nice
7) 2008 Yatir - enough said! WOW!
8) 2008/2009 Carmel single vineyard (new bottles and vineyards) Merlot, and Kayoumi cab/shiraz - nice!
9) The recanati specials were nice as well, though the Wild Carignan did not do it for me
10) The Barkan Assemblage(s), were fun - new blends, with the Tzapit (Marselan, Carignan, Pinotage, and <unknown>) the best, Eitan and Raychan were normal Bordeaux blends
11) Yarden 2T, Kela Merlot, 2009 Gamla Syrah, 2008 Tel Pheres Syrah, 2008 Cab
12) ONE CLEAR WINNER - 2008 El Rom Cab
13) Netofa wines, OK, the Tinto was unique but not awe inspiring.
14) 2008 Carmel Mediterranean and Kayoumi Riesling
15) Tanya was over oaked in heavy burn barrels, making for heavy mouth drying tannins, but they were still nice, my favorite was his CF
16) Gat Shmoron wines - ALL GREAT - including a sweet ice wine made from Viognier! (VERY EXPENSIVE)
17) Ramat Naftali was OK
18) Sassy - not enjoyable
19) New winery - Shamayim - nice wines
20) Livni - same exact comments as with Tanya, my favorite was Livni Cab
21) 2009 Tishbi Malbec - nice

Next Day

22) Gvaot - Getting better - but as stated - very expensive (Favorite PN)
23) Lueria - nice wines
24) Tura - fun wines (2010 Chard my favorite)
25) Kadesh Barnea - average
26) Saslove's kosher wines were OK, though the Aviv Mariage - was NICE
27) Gush wines, some say they are ovr the hill, I tasted the 2009, 2010, 2007, and 2008 - non were over the hill to me, though some were getting very soft
28) Ventura - nice guy, with average+ wines, the CF was his best
29) 2008 Galil Yiron - MEGA LET DOWN, it was OK, not awesome - 2008 Meron was awesome!!
30) Teperberg Malbec nice,. the rest OK
31) 2008 Galil Barbera and Pinot - nice, Viognier - average, Avivim - really nice
32) Barkan eleveation wines, 2008 720, 624, and 412 - nice!

There you have it - really fun....
Checkout http://www.kosherwinemusings.com for my blogs on the world of kosher wines and follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/kosherwinemuse.
no avatar
User

Alexander F

Rank

Ultra geek

Posts

465

Joined

Sun May 02, 2010 6:44 am

Location

Israel

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Alexander F » Sun Nov 13, 2011 10:34 am

Wow David, you're a true monster, 180 wines!!
no avatar
User

Adam N

Rank

Wine geek

Posts

33

Joined

Mon Dec 20, 2010 8:33 am

Re: Sommolier 2011

by Adam N » Mon Nov 14, 2011 5:48 am

I can vouch for David's 180! I was with him both days for all 9 hours.and a pizza on the way home.
I agree with most of his list but I would put the Adir Cab 09 as Most improved while maintaining a fair price.
Pleasantly surprised at Luria. His 2006 Grand Vital is still holding up nicely. Yes, Gvaot still has price for value issues. However they are making good (Not great) wine that are hitting the "popular palat" which I think is accounting for their success. Tulip White Franc was nice. Or Haganuz was indeed a pleasant surprise. Here, in Israel, they still have a moderate price point. Kadesh barnea was ok at best. Gush Etzion whites will succeed for the same reason Gvaot Reds do. They are not great wines but they hit the popular palat flavors of fruit and soft acidity. Same for the Gush Etzion Nahal Kramim. A small winery Called Har Brachah got my attention, however, I think they are still priced to high. Livni had only 2 wines I feel worth mentioning. His 100% Cab 09 and his Cab 07. I chose these mostly because, they were tasting great for the price on the shelf. were talking, after nis to $ flip, 17$ and 22$. LOVED the Netofa wines! They were very inspiring in the uniquness. Very much in the direction of Yarden 2T but Cheaper. yarden Odem Chard 2008 was awesome as expected. The 2008 Merlot was, well, relatively flat, in comparison to previous years. Kela Merlot was a much better example of there reputation. El Rom was, as expected, great. However someone should have these bottles opened for a half hour before pouring. I had to keep mine in my glass for 20 min before it opened up.Two very important finale notes: 1) Many boutique wineries such as Shiloh, Psagot, Tzuba,and Har Odem, just to name a few were not there. Shiloh Imparticular was sorely missed as Shiloh SOD series all won GOLd in Eshkol Hazahav this year.
POINT 2) David is correct in that there seems to be a lean towards heavier Tanin as opposed to heavier flavor. Lets hope that 2011 wont have this issue they correct this craziness!

SOrry you all missed the show,
Adam N

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests

Powered by phpBB ® | phpBB3 Style by KomiDesign