Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, focusing primarily on wines that are either kosher or Israeli.
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Gabriel Geller

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Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Gabriel Geller » Wed May 09, 2012 8:28 am

The forum seems a bit asleep today... So I'd like to suggest a chat about one of the most preoccupying questions in life... :wink:

Aren't you tired of hearing all the time that the only pairing suitable with a big steak is a big and bold red wine, that goose liver is the inseparable companion of sweet white wines, dry white with fish, rosé with asian food etc.? No? Well, I am! (Although I just tweeted such boring suggestions minutes ago... :oops: )

I'd like very much to try myself and experience some uncommon ideas for a change. Thoughts anyone :?:

Best,

GG
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Jonathan K

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Jonathan K » Wed May 09, 2012 9:09 am

Not sure how outside the box this is but:

1. Cab Franc with sushi
2. Champagne or other sparkler with buttered pop corn
3. White Riojas with beef stew.
4. Whatever you feel like drinking with whatever you feel like eating.
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Joshua London

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Joshua London » Wed May 09, 2012 9:38 am

Jonathan K wrote:4. Whatever you feel like drinking with whatever you feel like eating.

Exactly so. I'm reminded of a Wine Spectator interview of culinary legend Jacques Pépin:
WS: What is your approach toward wine as part of a meal?
JP: Preferably a lot of it and not too expensive. In my culture, when I was a kid in France, we had wine on the table and that was the wine--it was usually red--that you had with your onion soup or your fish or your roast chicken. For special occasions, you would open a corked bottle...

In the so-called Old World, where wine is, or at least was, an inseparable part of life, they tend to drink whatever grows locally in part because it is symbiotic with the cuisine. It all, as it were, grows from the same soil. There is nothing wrong with following the old "rules of thumb," if you like, but understand that they are little more than enshrined whims or prejudices -- in some cases they work seemingly "timelessly" but in others, not. There is no objective standard here. As Jonathan K rightly pointed out, it truly is "whatever" works for your tastes. When entertaining others, it makes for a more convivial evening if their tastes are kept in mind as well -- which is partly how "rules" get started to begin with. Just be guided by common sense and experience (both of which, hopefully, improve over time).
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Stacey B

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Stacey B » Wed May 09, 2012 9:41 am

We drink Merlot with Chinese food in particular Recanati Reserve 2007(thank you - Yehoshua), with glazed corned beef we drink Dalton Zinfandel or Recanati Petit Syrah Zinfandel. These Zinfandel wines also work with our own rendition of schezwuan sesame chicken.
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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Stacey B » Wed May 09, 2012 9:43 am

BTW can someone suggest a wine that can be paired with roasted artichokes that doesn't taste sickeningly off? I have yet to discover one.
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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Joshua London » Wed May 09, 2012 10:09 am

Stacey B wrote:BTW can someone suggest a wine that can be paired with roasted artichokes that doesn't taste sickeningly off? I have yet to discover one.

Depends a bit on food prep. Artichokes can leave a notable, astringent bitterness behind which can often war with tannic and oak aged reds, and they have a polyphenolic compound called cynarin that can pervert flavors and tends to make everything taste a little sweet.

I find that a dry white wine with a high acid content, such as Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Blanc or Pinot Gris, will help to balance this effect. Depending on how much caramelization you get from the roasting or grilling of the artichokes, the raw edge can be greatly reduced or even eliminated -- allowing them to pair well with red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon or Petite Sirah.

Personally, If the artichokes are part of a meal rather than just a snack on their own, I recommend boiling them in an ample amount of water first, in order to eliminate as much of the cynarin as possible, before proceeding with a recipe. Add salt and seasonings after the artichokes are cooked. If using a dressing or sauce with the artichoke, instead of just melted butter, this will obviously also affect wine flavor, and gives you more to play with too.
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Gabriel Geller

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Gabriel Geller » Wed May 09, 2012 10:29 am

Jonathan K wrote:2. Champagne or other sparkler with buttered pop corn(...)
4. Whatever you feel like drinking with whatever you feel like eating.

2. I should have thought of that! Nice!
4. AMEN! 8)

Stacey B wrote:with glazed corned beef we drink Dalton Zinfandel or Recanati Petit Syrah Zinfandel. These Zinfandel wines also work with our own rendition of schezwuan sesame chicken.

Sounds awesome! Gotta try that asap! 8)
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Gabriel Geller

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Gabriel Geller » Wed May 09, 2012 10:35 am

Stacey B wrote:We drink Merlot with Chinese food in particular Recanati Reserve 2007(thank you - Yehoshua)

Had Pinot Noir (Livni '09) with chinese food on chol hamoed Pesach, was unanimously appreciated! A fellow forumite suggested a Gewurztraminer which is one of those common pairing suggestions but I felt that day like drinking a red so I picked the PN and certainly not regretting it. :D
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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Stacey B » Wed May 09, 2012 11:23 am

We had Livni Sadeh Kalev Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 with pasta Salsa rosa last night and it was excellent too! BTW thanks Gabriel for the intro to their Pinot Noir it really turned my head around to appreciate Pinot when I thought I never would!
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Gabriel Geller

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Gabriel Geller » Wed May 09, 2012 11:39 am

Stacey B wrote:We had Livni Sadeh Kalev Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 with pasta Salsa rosa last night and it was excellent too! BTW thanks Gabriel for the intro to their Pinot Noir it really turned my head around to appreciate Pinot when I thought I never would!

Anytime Stacey! My pleasure! :D
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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by gaston k » Wed May 09, 2012 1:58 pm

The Alfasi Reserve Malbec-Syrah goes very well with beef and broccoli.
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Yehoshua Werth

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Yehoshua Werth » Wed May 09, 2012 3:03 pm

How about Artichoke's with Dry Gewirtraminer..
Flinty or Mineraly please.. :)

Stewed mushroom salad and small "peaces" & small bites hearbecious turkey with Segals Rechasim Argaman

:)
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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Andrew B » Wed May 09, 2012 5:05 pm

Stacey B wrote:BTW can someone suggest a wine that can be paired with roasted artichokes that doesn't taste sickeningly off? I have yet to discover one.



Pinot Noir. Try it!
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YoelA

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by YoelA » Wed May 09, 2012 8:11 pm

I don't like artichokes.

On the main question, note that over in Alsace, where the winters are a bit cold and the country is famous for its rich stews, the red wines are basically all wimps and what is drunk with big-bodied rich stews is bone-dry riesling, gewurtztraminer, pinot blanc and a couple of other whites. Likewise Switzerland, where the best red wines are still pretty light-bodied and dry whites are the usual accompaniment.
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Yehoshua Werth

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Yehoshua Werth » Wed May 09, 2012 8:16 pm

How About Buffalo with Har Bracha Merlot :)

and great thought Yoel.. So cool BIG whites :)
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Daniel Kovnat

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Re: Think out of the box: Wine and Food

by Daniel Kovnat » Sat May 12, 2012 5:47 am

And then there's just sipping a nice cooled white or rosé in the summer under our pergola with its grape vine giving shade. Who needs food????
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