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TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:59 am

With Larry Meehan, Lew Roderick and the Boston crowd at Jimmy’s Café.

2001 Christoffel Urziger Wurzgarten Kabinett Goldkapsel: This Christoffel was surprisingly advanced since the last time I had it. There was no sulfur obscuring the crisp apples slices that dominated the palate. Round acidity and excellent length.

1981 R Lopez de Heredia Vina Bosconia Gran Reserva Goldkapsel: Ahhhhhh, Larry knows what Papa likes! After ten minutes in the glass, this Bosconia (predictably) erupted with notes of licorice, mushrooms, leather, and old, wet, tree stumps. The palate was nicely proportioned and a bit meatier than the more acidic 76. I have fond memories of drinking through a number of the 81 Tondonia and Bosconia as a single, strapping, twenty-one year old stag. *Sigh* Of course, (way) back then I bought these wines for $30-something dollars a pop.

Where have the years gone?


1985 Barge Cote-Rotie Goldkapsel (this one’s for you, Mike): Fortune allowed me to taste this bottle once before, and it was one of my most profound Cote-Rotie moments. Unfortunately, this bottle did not have all of the impressiveness of the first one. The fresh notes of evergreen trees and juniper were lost in the nose and palate. As well, I wrote in my book that the wine “curiously disappeared halfway through the mid-palate”. Still, it was a decent drink and nobody much minded… until Mike threw in the challenge flag. “I’m challenging that this wine is corked” announces Mike. Collectively we all *Pfffffft* him as there were none of the typical forward TCA aromas in the nose. Sure, the palate was an enigma, but that doesn’t mean it’s corked. Disheartened, Mike retreated to his glass and mumbled to himself for a while. In the name of science, I took the rest of the bottle home (only one glass left) and sure enough, eight hours later there was no questioning that the wine was indeed corked. -You go, Mike-

1985 Contino Reserva Goldkapsel: This was a twenty-one year old Rioja that drank like… like… like some kind of red light district Rioja tart! Seriously. The nose was all voluptuous and in your face with slutty fruit notes, and the palate was far chewier than any decent Rioja had the right to be. I was stunned by how youthful it was; truly this wine needs more time. Mike, the chauvinistic fruit lover that he is, adored this wine. “Finally, a Rioja that I like!” he said to Larry who was equally moved. “Funny you should say that,” I began, “because this is also one of Plotnicki’s all-time favs.”

“Well, maybe it’s not that good..." agree Mike and Larry with somber, inflective, expressions.

2001 Lavradores de Feitoria, Quinta da Costa das Aguaneiras N. 06 Goldkapsel: Eh.

1996 Sandrone Cannubi Boschis Barolo Goldkapsel: Tight, as one would expect from a top-shelf 1996 Barolo, but still showing the stuffing that will take this wine through all the right moves. Despite my penchant for traditional Barolo, I like the cut of Sandrone’s jib.

2001 Bartolo Mascarello Barbera Goldkapsel: Oaky and clumsy, but some sweet plum tomatoes show through what would have been an otherwise anonymous wine.

1994 Voge Cornas Vieilles Fontaine Goldkapsel: Initially, this Cornas showed a bit of VA, but after swirling the acidity in the palate proved to be quite nice. Great typical Cornas notes, and a very nice wine.

1995 Lorentz Riesling VT Goldkapsel: Obviously, someone was fibbing, Mike or Lorentz, I can’t be sure, but this wine was certainly not a typical VT in terms of sweetness. It was alright, but not up to the usual acclaim of a Lorentz sticky (since it wasn’t).

2003 Müller-Catoir Gimmeldinger Schlössel Rieslaner Spätlese Goldkapsel: Making up for the Lorentz, this Muller-Catoir both smelled and tasted like a 7-11 Slurpie -- “No weezing the juice!”

The last wine of the night had a name like “Chateau Memories, Cuvee Cadillac Goldkapsel.” I’m not 100% on this one, Mike distracted me by spouting,

“Cadillac! You know, like the Clash… right? The Clash! Cadillac! Woo-aah!”

Both PMAC and I stared at Mike as if he had two heads, blinked a few times, then went back to discussing our favorite Goldkap of the evening.



With Yixin, his girlfriend Juliana, Mike, Carla, Bill, Lill and Amy:

2000 Gresser Wiebelsberg Riesling: Great nose, great palate. This tasty Riesling showed marvelous mineral qualities. Very pure and refined.

2000 Weinbach Schlossberg -L’Inedit: Yixin comes close to frothing at the mouth when he sees a Weinbach, knowing this, Mike couldn’t resist pulling one from his cellar. This bottle started with a hot nose and ended with a spicy finish. Heavy notes of melons and apple pie bellied the middle.

1994 Domaine La Pinte Chateau Chalon: I’ve never seen a Chateau-Chalon in the states that I can remember. At first taste, I was a bit overwhelmed, but I soon became interested and then infatuated with it. It wasn’t the most pleasuring wine, but it had a inexplicable ability to captivate my attention. I was reminded of a R Lopez de Heredia Tondonia Blanco, but more edgy and less creamy. Anyone know where I can source some without hopping the pond?

Sandeman Royal Corregidor: I brought this bottle of Sherry for perspective against the higher end bottles to follow. At $20ish, it (along with Byass’ Del Duque) is my go-to bottle of Sherry when I want something nice, but not too nice. Tonight was a normal showing with good acidity, medium length and a touch of sweetness.

Valdespino Solera 1842 Solera Oloroso: Wow, certainly a step up from the Sandeman, this Oloroso featured a small amount of PX in it, which gave created some wonderful tertiary sweetness. Notes of dates, almonds, molasses and toffee. This is one of those outstanding wines that I struggle with describing just how marvelous it was. I assume everyone has tasted dates, and most have tasted date-nuances in wines, but until you’ve tasted THIS wine you don’t know the potential for something so simple.

Lustau Almacenista Oloroso Añada 1918 Pilar Aranda y Latorre: They don’t make them like this anymore… literally… the Pilar Aranda casks were sold off in 1998. The Sherry world is the lesser for it, and as (both Yixin and Manuel informed me) this sold for $30-$40 about eight years ago. Currently, I’ve seen remaining bottles sell for between $100-$200! Gads. Price aside, the start to this wine was actually a bit too angry for me, but the finish was magnificent, lingering well over a minute. Powerful wine. I couldn’t decide which Sherry I liked better between this and the Valdespino. The notes of the Valdespino were unquestionably enticing, but the finish of this wine… I guess it doesn’t matter which one I like best as they were both exceptional.

1990 G. Borgogno Riserva: This wine showed how I expected it to, nice enough, but far too rustic and linear… something I’ve come to expect from 80’s and early 90’s Borgogno.

1978 Ceretto Prapo: The Prapo took a while to open up, leaning towards some notes of rust initially, but near the end of the night the palate came together and drank very well. It wasn’t crazy-good Barolo, but it was still quite good.

1994 G. Conterno Cascina Francia: I believe Mike cornered the market on ‘94 G. Conterno. I’m not sure how many bottles we’ve drank over the years, but every time we have one it’s “Mike’s last bottle.” Dramatics notwithstanding, I’m always happy to see Mike flourish another bottle, and sadden to think it might be our last. Despite the hard vintage, there is great Nebbiolo purity in the notes. The palate is a bit weak, and this showing wasn’t quite as focused as previous bottles, but still a great Risotto wine.

1995 Selbach Oster Zeltinger Sonnenuhr Auslese (Two Star): Insipid. Petrol-y. Something bad might have happened to this wine along the way.

1985 MönchHof Ürziger Würzgarten Beerenauslese GoldKap: Mediocre dessert wine with some nuances of passion fruit and honey.



With an assemblage of PMACian folks.

2000 Trimbach Pinot Gris Reserve: Everyone else in the world should just stop using this grape.

2000 Chateau Fieuzal Blanc: This white Bordeaux was layered with notes of cut hay, clovers, lemongrass and more. Very dry and a bit “hither and yon” at the moment, this baby needs more time. The Sauvignon Blanc was a bit dominant at this juncture, as well. Certainly, Fieuzal is one of the best dry white wines being made in Bordeaux.

1990 Boillot Volnay: If Forrest Gump’s character was a modern Manhattanite, he would have said something along the lines of,

“Mamma said life is like a bottle of 1990 Burgundy - you never know what you’re gonna get.”


This here bottle of 1990 Burgundy had a surprisingly meaty nose (for Volnay) but it was as if all the density was sucked out of the palate and put into that nose; like a Twinkie with the cream sucked out.
Yep.
Just like it.
*Ahem* There was still healthy acid and even tannin left, despite the hollowness.

1993 Tempier Tourtine: Thanks to a constant bombardment from Mike, PMAC, Rey and Trung, I have grown to appreciate the wines of Tempier - I’m not sure if I like them - but I can definitely see the attraction. This 1993 is entering a really good drinking window, where the tannin are less oppressive and the bramble/briar notes are coming through. Tempier is always very flavor-dense wine, and as distinctive as they come.

1996 Pierre Matrot Blagny La Piece Sous Le Bois: I’ve roughly translated the cuvee of this wine to mean “The Children of the Corn.” Wacky French. The wine itself tasted like bile and cigars.

1999 Mugnier Chambolle-Musigny: Tannic and masculine with notes of cherries and spice eking through the tightness. Nowhere near ready.

2001 B. Giacosa Barbera: Maybe it was the acid in the Blagny, but I was immediately flashbacked to the 2001 Bartolo Barbera. Oak, good acid, more oak, and nice fruit. Well made wine, but what more can be said?

1995 Sori Paitin Barbaresco: Closed at the moment, showing some nice balance despite the lack of expressiveness.

1989 Baumard Coteaux du Layon (not the Paon): This CdL may have been a bit passed optimal drinking as the finish was a touch drying. Still, nice notes of pears and some typical beeswax weaved throughout.

1983 Warres Vintage Port: Tim Tanigawa, the sadistic bastard, brought a vintage port to the restaurant within walking distance of his pad, knowing that we’d all be forced to drive home afterwards. Of course, none of us could say no… As to be expected, this was a delicious bottle of Port with loads of candied notes and relatively absent tannin.


(I think that catches me up on things)


Best,
Joe
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Bill Buitenhuys

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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Bill Buitenhuys » Thu Sep 21, 2006 4:34 pm

You get a gold star (or is it a gold cap?) for this data dump.

With Larry Meehan, Lew Roderick and the Boston crowd at Jimmy’s Café. Ouch..now I'm more sick from being sick and missing this one. '81 Bosconia..mmmm. Are most of the better '85's still as young as the Contino? And that Cadillac is "Ch. Memoires". Hearing Mike sing Clash songs..Priceless.

With Yixin, his girlfriend Juliana, Mike, Carla, Bill, Lill and Amy: I think I'm going have to ween my way from PX and cream sherry to Oloroso just like I went from a Dunkin regular to cream only. It will take time, but it will be worth it. fun night all around.

With an assemblage of PMACian folks. Ohh, you're opening up to Bandol? There is hope after all. Hmm, pinot gris is one of those varietals I havent explored to much. Looks like I can start (and stop?) at Trimbach?
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Thu Sep 21, 2006 9:46 pm

Bill Buitenhuys wrote:You get a gold star (or is it a gold cap?) for this data dump.

With Larry Meehan, Lew Roderick and the Boston crowd at Jimmy’s Café. Ouch..now I'm more sick from being sick and missing this one. '81 Bosconia..mmmm. Are most of the better '85's still as young as the Contino? And that Cadillac is "Ch. Memoires". Hearing Mike sing Clash songs..Priceless.

With Yixin, his girlfriend Juliana, Mike, Carla, Bill, Lill and Amy: I think I'm going have to ween my way from PX and cream sherry to Oloroso just like I went from a Dunkin regular to cream only. It will take time, but it will be worth it. fun night all around.

With an assemblage of PMACian folks. Ohh, you're opening up to Bandol? There is hope after all. Hmm, pinot gris is one of those varietals I havent explored to much. Looks like I can start (and stop?) at Trimbach?


Yeah, you missed a good one at Jimmy's. Just stay healthy for the next go-round in October.

Dry Sherries take time. It took me a few years, but now I can't get enough of the stuff. It's the perfect evening wine to kick back with.

Bandol? Let's just stay with Tempier Bandol for now. :shock:
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Michael Malinoski » Fri Sep 22, 2006 12:18 am

Hi,

Just to add to the PMACian assemblage notes from Joe above:

2000 Trimbach Pinot Gris Alsace Reserve. Sporting a bright yellow color, this Pinot Gris has a flowery nose with bright tropical fruits, quince and a bit of musk. On the palate, it offers a lush open texture with plenty of effusive fresh fig and pear fruit flavors. It is medium-bodied but heavier-bottomed and a bit richer than I anticipated. A very nice start.

1989 Domaine des Baumards Coteaux du Layon Demi-Sec. This wine is dark gold colored but brightly tinted. It has a nose with strong musky elements, wild honey, beeswax, and dried ginger aromas. In the mouth, there is a fine yin-yang pull between the fig, apricot and butterscotch sweetness and something akin to grainy bitter peach pit elements. Adequate acidity keeps it moving along through the finish. I took this one home and refrigerated it overnight. The next day, the bitterness was poking out a lot more and it had flattened out quite a bit. Perhaps on the downside, but on this night it was enjoyable both before and after the meal.

2000 Chateau de Fieuzal Pessac-Leognan Blanc. Pale straw color. At first, the nose is simply a singular expression of fresh peach fuzz. After some time, wet stone and dried flowers fold in nicely. In the mouth, it is rather high in acid at this young stage, with restrained stone, lime pith and pear flavors. The finish is tight but promisingly intense. I imagine it needs 5+ years to round out and begin to strut more of its stuff.

Next up was a six-pack of reds to sample with our 3 ducks.

1995 Paitin Barbaresco Sori Paitin. This opens with a dark fragrant nose of dusty black cherry, dark berries and forest floor. There’s also subtle cedar and herb underneath. One finds sour cherry and plum in the mouth with plenty of acidity and a solid structure. This bottle needed more air and should have been decanted, but the tannins seem pretty resolved and there’s good stuffing here for another day. I’ll revisit in 5 years.

1993 Domaine Tempier Bandol Cuvee Speciale La Tourtine. Dusty brownish/purple colored with some clearing at the rim. The nose is smoky, with leather and brambly dark berries and a bit of dank earthiness over some peppermint spice. It’s woodsy and dark-fruited in the mouth, with every sip ending in a rich, long finish. Nicely distinctive and drinking well.

1990 Jean-Marc Boillot Volnay. Smoky burnt-red color. This wine opens with a promising nose of sweet berries, soft shoe leather and a bit of sweet dense earthiness. However, it is considerably less engaging once it passes the lips—faded fruit, high acidity, out of whack balance, brittle dry structure. Oh well.

1996 Domaine Joseph Matrot Blagny La Piece Sous le Bois 1er Cru. I gather from Joe’s notes that he was not a fan of this wine, but I enjoyed it plenty. It’s pale ruby in color, with significant fading at the edge. The nose offers up soft berries, sous bois and cherries. In the mouth, big acids war with black cherries and earth. Zippo tannins left, but decent structure hanging in. It has a decent finish, but a bit too much acid poking out.

1999 Jacques-Frederic Mugnier Chambolle-Musigny. The nose is pretty shy at this young stage, with some dark cherry fruit, mineral and black tea. It is tight and sinewy in the mouth with good acidity up-front, dark cherries and bark in the mid-palate and a somewhat dry, tannin-laden finish. This feels will be much better with some age when it can unfold.

2001 Bruno Giacosa Barbera d’Alba Falletto di Serralunga. Man, this is a bit rough all around, starting with the nose, which exhibits grilled meat, smoke, rubber, blackberries and baked plum. It settles down a bit with air, but there is still a lot of dark toasted wood prominent. This bouquet made my nostrils feel sandpapered afterwards for a few minutes. It is nicer in the mouth, with abundant sweet black raspberry fruit and a pretty plush texture, but it can’t escape abundant tannins and oak. Decent length finish.

1985 Warres Vintage Port. I estimate this bottle was decanted about 2 hours by the time I got around to my first glass. This is drinking very nicely and was a great cap-off to the evening. It shows aromas of warm roasted nuts and sweet plum, with something unexpected in the background like dull spearmint, and also just a touch of subdued spirits. It has very nice medium weight and a plush mouthfeel, with sweet plum and chocolate raspberry flavors. Not made in a blockbuster style, but more on the elegant side, with well-integrated tannins and alcohol.

Thanks!
Michael
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Fri Sep 22, 2006 1:07 am

Look at you getting all "factual" with your notes... :P
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Michael Malinoski » Fri Sep 22, 2006 1:40 am

That's my rep! :D
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Jenise » Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:16 am

Glad to see someone opening an 80's vintage port and not get pounded for infanticide. Which is what tends to happen in my neck of the woods, quite unfairly I sometimes think. Oh sure, the wines can be glorious with even more age on them, but also quite nice at 20 and why scare off those not so fortunate as to been purchasers way back then? Nice notes, Joe and Mike. And Mike--welcome, I don't believe I've seen your name here before.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Bill Buitenhuys » Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:58 am

Hi Michael, thanks for the gory details. In always good to have some facts next to Joe's midnight rambling.
And welcome to the board. Hope to meet you at one of this shindigs soon...maybe at Joe's bday jeebola?
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Robin Garr » Fri Sep 22, 2006 8:56 am

Michael Malinoski wrote:Just to add to the PMACian assemblage notes from Joe above:


Michael, great notes! Thanks for posting, and welcome to the forum! Glad you found your way here and hope you'll hang around.

Does PMac still use the coffee pot decanter? Haven't seen that guy for ages!
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Michael Malinoski » Fri Sep 22, 2006 11:13 am

Bill, Robin, Jenise:

Thanks a lot for the kind welcome. I've been told numerous times that this is the place to be, so here I am!

Bill, I do hope we can meet soon. I'm not aware of the Joe bday jeebola, but then again this was my first time meeting him! Maybe you can help me weasel my way on to the VIP guest list!

I've been to three or four get-togethers this summer with PMAC--and his trusty Mr Coffee has been right by his side each time. I have come to quickly look forward to whatever wine is poured from Mr Coffee, as it is usually one of the WOTN's. I think he said that like Lassie, this is really about the 8th different Mr Coffee, but they are all just called "Mr Coffee".
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Jenise » Fri Sep 22, 2006 11:59 am

Pardon my inquisitiveness, but I have to hear more about the Mr. Coffee decanter. I'm thinking wide, large opening, cheap...?
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Michael Malinoski » Fri Sep 22, 2006 12:04 pm

You are correct.

I guess it travels well, has a wide surface area, has a handle and has a lip for pouring (including leftovers back into the bottle to take home). When you think about it, it actually makes sense... :D
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:11 pm

Bill Buitenhuys wrote: Hope to meet you at one of this shindigs soon...maybe at Joe's bday jeebola?



Shhhh! :shock:


Ah well, now that the cat is out of the bag, Michael is more than welcome to join us at Jimmy's Cafe in Wellesley on October 5th :D
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:11 pm

Michael Malinoski wrote:You are correct.

I guess it travels well, has a wide surface area, has a handle and has a lip for pouring (including leftovers back into the bottle to take home). When you think about it, it actually makes sense... :D


Don't forget, "easy to clean!"
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:13 pm

Bill Buitenhuys wrote: Are most of the better '85's still as young as the Contino?


The 85's rock the casbah.
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Bill Buitenhuys » Fri Sep 22, 2006 2:38 pm

The 85's rock the casbah.
Don't you go starting with The Clash references too now.

Can't wait for the shipment of '85 LdH's to arrive....
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by JoePerry » Fri Sep 22, 2006 3:24 pm

Funny, I can't wait for your '85 RLdH to arrive, either!
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Bill Buitenhuys » Fri Sep 22, 2006 3:58 pm

Funny, I can't wait for your '85 RLdH to arrive, either!
:shock:
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Re: TN: A Zillion Wines (long, poor grammar)

by Jenise » Sun Sep 24, 2006 3:48 pm

Michael Malinoski wrote:You are correct.

I guess it travels well, has a wide surface area, has a handle and has a lip for pouring (including leftovers back into the bottle to take home). When you think about it, it actually makes sense... :D


Actually, it makes perfect sense, and with the Lassie comparison it even takes on the stuff of internet wine legend! I'm almost jealous that I didn't think of it myself.
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