Bordeaux in the grocery store

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Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby RonicaJM » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:27 pm

A couple of you recommended Chateau Larose-Trintaudon 2000. I found it at my local grocery store for about $20. My question is. Do you think it's safe to purchase there? I mean sitting on the shelf of a gorcery store for who knows how long. Now, the temperature is always cold in there, even in the summer, but it hasn't been on it's side. So, what's the verdict?
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby Ian Sutton » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:45 pm

Ronica
I think temperature is the bigger killer of wines (just an unproved opinion though), so as long as it's not got a 1.2KW halogen lamp toasting it, then standing upright is not a massive issue IMO. If there's any great difference in fill level in the wines, so for the one with the highest fill (I always feel like a sad cheapskate when doing this, though it's because the higher filled wine should show the wine most likely to age slower and not be oxidised, not as I suspect the watching hordes believe, I just want more wine for my money :oops: ).

FWIW some Italian producers apparently mature their wine upright and don't seem to have massive problems.

I'd say cool = safe and buy a bottle from there.

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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby Robin Garr » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:56 pm

RonicaJM wrote:So, what's the verdict?


Ronica, I agree with Ian. I think you're safe. Considering that the wine is at least in an air-conditioned environment and that it's a very sturdy red, I'm less worried about its non-cellar temp or even upright storage than I would be about extreme heat.

Also remember that 2000 is the year that the grapes actually grew. At the absolute earliest, the wine got to your grocer well into 2002, and chances are that it was quite a bit later than that. It's entirely possible that it came from the warehouse in recent months. (Of course, this raises the issue of what the storage in the <i>warehouse</i> was like, but hey ... at least in this regard the supermarket is at parity with any other vendor.)

Follow Ian's good advice about fill levels, and should they ALL look like they've got an unusual amount of air in the neck, be wary.

If the store isn't one of those huge, anonymous ones where you can't talk to anybody, you might also chat up the manager, mention that you're interested in this wine but concerned about it having been on the shelf for some time, and ask if they have a return policy for wine that's gone bad (assuming you bring back the almost-full bottle).
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby David Creighton » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:57 pm

agree - the price is no bargain, though.
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby Covert » Mon Oct 09, 2006 6:19 pm

creightond wrote:agree - the price is no bargain, though.


It's a bargain if nobody tells you it isn't. 2000 Larose Trintaudon is a pretty good wine, but it isn't a typical Bordeaux in that it is so forward. But you can tell it is definitely a Bordeaux and not from California. The Cabernet Sauvignon is really nice and true to the grape. Great wine with hamburgers or steak. So many restaurants carry it that I have probably drunk 15 bottles or so.

From everything I know, you could stand one of these puppies on end for five years and suffer no ill effects. They probably would benefit in the short run from possibly aging a touch faster. But probably nothing could be noticed for five years or longer. Heat! that's the bare bodkin.
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby RonicaJM » Tue Oct 10, 2006 3:18 am

Robin Garr wrote:If the store isn't one of those huge, anonymous ones where you can't talk to anybody, you might also chat up the manager, mention that you're interested in this wine but concerned about it having been on the shelf for some time, and ask if they have a return policy for wine that's gone bad (assuming you bring back the almost-full bottle).


I will talk to the manager at the service desk and I will even ask for a discount, that's my specialty. :lol:
Last edited by RonicaJM on Tue Oct 10, 2006 3:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby RonicaJM » Tue Oct 10, 2006 3:20 am

Covert wrote:It's a bargain if nobody tells you it isn't. 2000 Larose Trintaudon is a pretty good wine, but it isn't a typical Bordeaux in that it is so forward. But you can tell it is definitely a Bordeaux and not from California. The Cabernet Sauvignon is really nice and true to the grape. Great wine with hamburgers or steak. So many restaurants carry it that I have probably drunk 15 bottles or so.

From everything I know, you could stand one of these puppies on end for five years and suffer no ill effects. They probably would benefit in the short run from possibly aging a touch faster. But probably nothing could be noticed for five years or longer. Heat! that's the bare bodkin.


From what you say Covert, it sounds like I might like this one. I'll let you know what I think. Thanks!
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby Covert » Fri Oct 13, 2006 5:21 am

RonicaJM wrote:From what you say Covert, it sounds like I might like this one. I'll let you know what I think.


I meant to mention before that a brand new Bordeaux cork is pretty fat, solid and long, normally. This will seal very well in the short and medium term. I think you have to worry about old corks drying out much more then new ones. New ones are a bit like green wood for the fireplace, I think. It would be fun to stand a Larose Trintaudon up for five years just to see how much, if at all, visually, the liquid would drop. I'll bet you could hardly see a difference.

Yes, please let us know what you thought of the 2000 Larose compared to a comparibly priced Cal cab. If you compare the two, you should get a good sense as to whether you are going to like Bordeaux better. If you do, then you should find an older one that isn't too expensive. And the '99s are generally a little more like a typical Bordeaux than the 2000s, I think; and a lot of them are inexpensive. And there are still '97s around that are quite mature, and not too expensive. They have some of the elements of Bordeaux that people who prefer New World wines do not like. If you like them, I would say that you are on your way to being a Bordeaux fan. See if you can find a '97 Talbot that hasn't been cooked too badly. That one is usually cheap because it got bad press from the start, and "experts" say it is past its prime. I think it is lovely.

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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby Thomas » Fri Oct 13, 2006 9:29 am

Good luck Ronica--I've always liked that producer, but haven't had any lately.
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Re: Bordeaux in the grocery store

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 13, 2006 1:49 pm

Here's another "go for it". As Covert pointed out, these bottles will have pretty good corks and the wine's relatively young. That it's been standing up all this time is probably not an issue on a wine this young--in 10 years you would probably see a significant difference between this bottle and one that had been properly stored since release, but right now? Should be fine. And the year is a good one for you with it's bigger, riper fruit. It will give you an excellent sense of Bordeauxness without a big investment.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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