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Bob Parsons Alberta

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So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:01 am

On this gentle, perhaps more solemn weekend, what are we thinking might be memorable to open?
For me, a couple of Montsant reds for the Open Mike thread. Also maybe, an elderly C du Layon.
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Howie Hart

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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Howie Hart » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:26 am

Today, I'll be celebrating the Marine Corps birthday, but tomorrow I'll drink something from Australia and listen to:
The Band Played Waltzing Matilda
:(
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Redwinger » Fri Nov 10, 2006 11:52 am

I haven't decided yet, but it will be something special from the cellar in honor of those who are truly special.
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Isaac » Fri Nov 10, 2006 3:37 pm

Maybe I should open something special to honor my own service!
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Fri Nov 10, 2006 8:01 pm

That sounds more like it Isaac!!......where is everyone this weekend?
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Rem

by Bob Henrick » Fri Nov 10, 2006 8:22 pm

It is not quite the weekend yet Bob, but tonight with some fresh pork side meat simply done in the skillet with fresh sage and some green onion tops to saute along with the pork, I opened my last 2002 ESJ Bone Jolly. I had heard that it might be time to drink them up as they were probably at the end of their life. twasn't so, as this one had 2-3 more years of life left. Never the less all that red fruit met a good end going between my teeth, and over the gums, a bit of a chew and swallow, lookout below here it comes. Steve did good with this one. :D
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Redwinger » Fri Nov 10, 2006 9:48 pm

Issac,
It is not about you...or me.
Peace,
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Rem

by Otto » Sat Nov 11, 2006 6:07 pm

I was intending to go with a Montsant for the OM, but was told not to. :( Instead I served to my bro and sis Pewsey Vale Eden Valley Riesling 2004 and Château de Chamirey Mercurey Domaine du Marquis de Jouennes 2004.

The Riesling was its usual lovely self: big boned (13% abv) but light on its feet, with pure Rieslingfruit and minerals. This has opened up well during the last half a year and is consistently one of my favourite cheaper wines available over here.

The Chamirey is another favourite value wine in most years (not tasted the 2003, though!). If I understood correctly, the Château de Chamirey vinifies the property of the Marquis (like Drouhin does to Laguiche's Montrachet). Even though it is from the special selection (i.e. with added costs) of our monopoly, I still find it good value at 23,30€. It is red toned on the nose, with lingonberry and an almost iron-like minerality and vegetality to the nose. It is much like the Faiveley I recently reported on, but not at all as stern. The palate is sweetly fruity, very Pinot-like, but with that Mercureyan iron-like note. I'm glad to see that this year is again a success.

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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Rem

by Rahsaan » Sat Nov 11, 2006 6:32 pm

I opened my last 2002 ESJ Bone Jolly. I had heard that it might be time to drink them up as they were probably at the end of their life. twasn't so, as this one had 2-3 more years of life left. Never the less all that red fruit met a good end going between my teeth, and over the gums, a bit of a chew and swallow, lookout below here it comes


Sounds good, I just had the 04 Bone Jolly the other day for my first taste of Steve's gamay, and it was nice, but it would indeed be interesting to taste with a bit more mellowed age..
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Isaac » Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:10 pm

Redwinger wrote:Issac,
It is not about you...or me.
Peace,
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It isn't? I thought it was Veterans' Day. It isn't Armistice Day anymore. Hasn't been for a long time.
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Howie Hart » Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:23 pm

Isaac wrote:
Redwinger wrote:Issac,
It is not about you...or me.
Peace,
BP
It isn't? I thought it was Veterans' Day. It isn't Armistice Day anymore. Hasn't been for a long time.

Thanks to all of you for your service. :wink:
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Redwinger » Sat Nov 11, 2006 10:27 pm

Thanks Howie. I was a reluctant draftee who perhaps through the stupidity of youth was one of the fortunate ones to come home unscathed. I always remember those who paid a much larger price. If I'm a bit touchy about this day not being about "me", I apologize to those offended.
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Ian Sutton » Sat Nov 11, 2006 11:19 pm

Redwinger wrote:Thanks Howie. I was a reluctant draftee who perhaps through the stupidity of youth was one of the fortunate ones to come home unscathed. I always remember those who paid a much larger price. If I'm a bit touchy about this day not being about "me", I apologize to those offended.
Bill

I don't think those of us who haven't been there, can understand what it was like for those of you that have. My peace-loving preferences don't mean a disrespect for soldiers, but generally for the two sets of politicians that put them there, as at least one side (and generally both) failed to fully appreciate the true cost of war. At least in ancient times the king/general was expected to lead the charge.

Bill: Make sure you raise a glass to those who didn't make it home, those that did and to peace. Have one for yourself as well.


regards

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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Isaac » Mon Nov 13, 2006 11:55 am

Redwinger wrote:Thanks Howie. I was a reluctant draftee who perhaps through the stupidity of youth was one of the fortunate ones to come home unscathed. I always remember those who paid a much larger price. If I'm a bit touchy about this day not being about "me", I apologize to those offended.
Bill
I'm not offended. I just think you're being touchy about the wrong thing.

Veterans' Day is for veterans. All of us. Please, don't try to take that away. Just because we survived doesn't make our contribution meaningless.

There is already a day for those who "gave all". That's Memorial Day, and when people try to give me credit on that day, I remind them that it is a day to remember those who have fallen, not those of us who survived.

I didn't serve in battle. Neither I, nor anyone I knew lost his life or was injured in battle. But we served, which is more than most flag-waving jingoists can say. I respect you for your service, and I insist on respect for mine. I earned it.
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Graeme Gee » Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:04 pm

I see confusion arising from the meaning of the various days. Here in Australia, we adopted Anzac Day (April 25) as the official ‘Memorial Day’. It commemorates the day in 1915 when the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (hence ANZAC) first saw service, in the ill-conceived landings on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Dardanelles. After a baptism of fire and 8000 casualties, the only military success of the whole campaign was the evacuation 8 months later. This calamitous defeat – the first action of our federated nation – is the peg on which we hang the memory of those who both died and served in all wars. The day is a public holiday in Australia (and NZ), normally commences with remembrance services at dawn all around the country, and is followed by various street parades of returned soldiers who then repair to toast old comrades for the rest of the day.

Remembrance Day, November 11, tends to be reserved in this part of the world to commemorate the Great War particularly. Australia sent 6% of its total population – an entirely volunteer army – to that war, and sustained the largest casualty rate among the Allied nations. And although Gallipoli tends to get the ‘publicity’, most of the casualties were sustained in the human mincer called the Western Front. That may have been the low point of humanity’s military history; WW2 and subsequent affairs have plumbed the civilian depths, but I don’t think there has ever been a bigger military tragedy than the Western Front of World War I. Soldier’s remains are still ploughed up every year by French farmers…
The day is not a public holiday here, but the tradition continues of a minute’s silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the very moment the guns fell silent in France and Belgium in 1918. I have visited some of the military cemeteries at these old battlefields; no-one could fail to be moved by what they find there. Fifteen-year olds killed while serving under their uncle’s name, brothers buried side by side; men who were killed three days before the armistice; it’s a heartbreaking experience.

Lest we forget.

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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Redwinger » Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:28 pm

Isaac wrote:
Redwinger wrote:Thanks Howie. I was a reluctant draftee who perhaps through the stupidity of youth was one of the fortunate ones to come home unscathed. I always remember those who paid a much larger price. If I'm a bit touchy about this day not being about "me", I apologize to those offended.
Bill
I'm not offended. I just think you're being touchy about the wrong thing.

Veterans' Day is for veterans. All of us. Please, don't try to take that away. Just because we survived doesn't make our contribution meaningless.

There is already a day for those who "gave all". That's Memorial Day, and when people try to give me credit on that day, I remind them that it is a day to remember those who have fallen, not those of us who survived.

I didn't serve in battle. Neither I, nor anyone I knew lost his life or was injured in battle. But we served, which is more than most flag-waving jingoists can say. I respect you for your service, and I insist on respect for mine. I earned it.

You have my respect and thanks.
I always get those Holidays confused...probably the drugs?
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Howie Hart » Tue Nov 14, 2006 8:45 am

Graeme Gee wrote:I see confusion arising from the meaning of the various days. Here in Australia, we adopted Anzac Day (April 25) as the official ‘Memorial Day’. It commemorates the day in 1915 when the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (hence ANZAC) first saw service, in the ill-conceived landings on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Dardanelles. After a baptism of fire and 8000 casualties, the only military success of the whole campaign was the evacuation 8 months later. This calamitous defeat – the first action of our federated nation – is the peg on which we hang the memory of those who both died and served in all wars. The day is a public holiday in Australia (and NZ), normally commences with remembrance services at dawn all around the country, and is followed by various street parades of returned soldiers who then repair to toast old comrades for the rest of the day.

Remembrance Day, November 11, tends to be reserved in this part of the world to commemorate the Great War particularly. Australia sent 6% of its total population – an entirely volunteer army – to that war, and sustained the largest casualty rate among the Allied nations. And although Gallipoli tends to get the ‘publicity’, most of the casualties were sustained in the human mincer called the Western Front. That may have been the low point of humanity’s military history; WW2 and subsequent affairs have plumbed the civilian depths, but I don’t think there has ever been a bigger military tragedy than the Western Front of World War I. Soldier’s remains are still ploughed up every year by French farmers…
The day is not a public holiday here, but the tradition continues of a minute’s silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the very moment the guns fell silent in France and Belgium in 1918. I have visited some of the military cemeteries at these old battlefields; no-one could fail to be moved by what they find there. Fifteen-year olds killed while serving under their uncle’s name, brothers buried side by side; men who were killed three days before the armistice; it’s a heartbreaking experience.

Lest we forget.

Graeme

Thanks for posting Graeme.
Novemeber 11 is the day that WW1 ended. It was originally referred to as Armistice Day. In the US, after WW2 it was changed to Veterans Day, to honor all who served in the armed forces. In some countries the date has been set aside to honor those who died during WW1 or all who died in wars as Rememberence Day. In the US, we already had a day set aside to honor those who gave their lives for their county, Memorial Day, which was established after our Civil War. It was also called Decoration Day, when people would place flowers and flags on graves. ANZAC Day I never heard of until about 10 years ago from a local priest, who taught in Australian seminary several years ago. I posted a link to Eric Bogle's song "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda" because the lyrics reflect what all these days are about: WW1, dead and wounded, thoughts of surviving veterans, the senselessness of war and confusion by those who don't understand the sacrifices that were made.
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by James Roscoe » Tue Nov 14, 2006 9:20 am

Howie,
Memorial Day was strictly a day celebrated in northern and western states for many years. States in the old Confederacy and neo-Confederate states like Missouri and Kentucky celebrated a different holiday on a different day either earlier in may or in June. I believe it was only after WWII that it became celebrated on the same date in every state.
Cheers!
James
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Howie Hart » Tue Nov 14, 2006 9:34 am

James,
Thanks for the clarification. Actually, it was after WW1 that all the states recognized it, but your point is made.
http://www.usmemorialday.org/backgrnd.html
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Re: So what are we thinking of opening this weekend...in Remembrance.

by Isaac » Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:44 pm

Redwinger wrote:You have my respect and thanks.
I always get those Holidays confused...probably the drugs?
BP
Maybe. It helps to find the optimum dose.

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