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Robin Garr

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Serious Eats reviews cork extractors

by Robin Garr » Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:28 am

Interesting Consumer Reports-style review of corkscrews and other extractors.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2018/04/the ... eners.html
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wnissen

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Re: Serious Eats reviews cork extractors

by wnissen » Thu Apr 12, 2018 1:00 pm

I wish they had reviewed the Leverpull; I know they're not the same any more, but that is really the Unicorn Magnum of corkscrews. The only time I've ever had a problem is with corks that are just falling apart and the ah-so is needed. The Rabbit is similar, but I noticed they said it had a problem with one cork, which seemed odd to me. How can a corkscrew not work? I also noticed that they are having a problem with counterfeit goods on Amazon, which is something I have dealt with a couple times now, that I'm aware of. Amazon does not do a good job of vetting the product from third-party sellers, that is for sure. Nothing is going to keep sophisticated fakes out of the system entirely, but some are obviously not the same product, and a child could figure that out just by glancing at the pictures in the listing.
Walter Nissen
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Victorwine

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Re: Serious Eats reviews cork extractors

by Victorwine » Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:18 pm

What the author refers to as "twist models, I would call "screwpull type" I bought my first table top Screwpull in the early 80's another one in the mid 90's and just last month two more (table top, and a pocket model).The very first one (the "original Srewpull) lasted me almost 30 years. After many years of extracting #9 corks from recycled Italian wine bottles designed for #8 corks that had colored wax tops (I used the colored wax to identify different lots of my homemade wine) it finally just gave up a split in two. The screwpull bought in the mid 90's lasted 22 years. Even though it had Screwpull printed on it, I believe it was a Le Creuset. (Le Creuset bought the Screwpull brand , I believe in the early 90's). This one had a rubber coating on the wing top which evantually started to peel away exposing the metal part of the wing which pricked your finger as you twisted it.The ones I recently bought, look identical to the original Screwpull but have Le Creuset printed on them. The table top model comes with a stand and a seperate foil cutter. The pocket model is pretty neat, its three pcs (the screw, main body and extendible handle) with an extractable foil cutter blade on the side of the main body of the tool. The handle acts like a screw protector and locking device to hold the tool together for pocket transport. Anyone familiar with a square peg and square window or square socket driver could easily figure out how to use it.
As far as the Brabanti goes, instead of squeezing the "main body" around the neck of the bottle, you have to firmly hold the tool down on the lip of the bottle when extracting the cork out. With my big hands and fat fingers that "little widow opening" doesn't help removing the cork from the screw.

Salute
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Steve Slatcher

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Re: Serious Eats reviews cork extractors

by Steve Slatcher » Fri Apr 13, 2018 1:30 pm

Just been checking out the Pulltex website, and noticed they have a left-handed corkscrew for not very much money - in fact it is their cheapest model. What a great idea for the next time someone asks to borrow your corkscrew :)

Anyway, back to the article. On Amazon UK now, the "budget" waiter's friend is around 3 times the price of the "best" waiter's friend! I have used the basic Pulltap now for so many years, I am so used to it, and like it so much, I would be afraid even to upgrade to a more expensive Pulltex model. Initially I had a problem with the rivet-thingy (that holds the screw in place) slipping out, but after bashing the end with a hammer it has been fine.

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