Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, welcoming foodies to discuss the dining scenes in Israel and abroad, along with all things related to kosher food.

AA Gill on food terroire...

User avatar
User

Mike_F

Rank

Ultra geek

Posts

654

Joined

Wed Jul 09, 2008 4:56 pm

Location

Rehovot, Israel

AA Gill on food terroire...

by Mike_F » Sun May 17, 2009 6:42 am

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_a ... 272869.ece

An interesting (and amusing) read. On the other hand it seems that mozarella di bufala from south Italy has its special taste because of a fungal species that lives in and on the vegetation that the buffalo feed upon. IMVHO, mozarella from other places tastes nothing like the original. Any other examples of foods for which geographical location IS critical?
Of course we must be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.”
Richard Dawkins
User avatar
User

Daniel Rogov

Rank

Resident Curmudgeon

Posts

12957

Joined

Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am

Location

Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: AA Gill on food terroire...

by Daniel Rogov » Sun May 17, 2009 8:14 am

Top of the head - Perigord truffles; Piedmont truffles; Camembert, Mozzarella, Brie, Parmigiao Reggiano, Manchego and probably 160 other cheeses; oysters, clams, lobsters, coquilles St. Jacques - depending largely on what part of what sea from which they come; blue, green, black, red and white Brittany sea salt; pineapples (even from Hawaii one can tell from which island they came); butter (if, after a bit of practice, one cannot tell whether it came from Ireland, England, Normandy, etc, one is brain dead); Madigascar green peppercorns; .....

Let us never forget that the relationship between food (or wine) and terroir involves a complex set of inter-related reactions - between the soil, the micro- and meso-climates, the methods of planting and trellissing, the methods of harvesting and of winemaking. As all wine starts in the vineyard, so does all food start in the soil but between there and the final product are many stages of intervention. Much, in my eyes, the kin to the development of human intelligence.

Best
Rogov
User avatar
User

Matilda L

Rank

Sparkling Red Riding Hood

Posts

1403

Joined

Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:48 am

Location

Adelaide, South Australia

Re: AA Gill on food terroire...

by Matilda L » Sun May 17, 2009 8:46 pm

Visitors to Australia should make sure to try lamb fed on saltbush. This native plant is tolerant of dry conditions and saline soils, and works well as grazing for sheep. The resulting meat is tender and flavoursome. Scientific studies have indicated the meat of saltbush fed lambs is more hydrated, lower in fat and higher in Vitamin E.
no avatar
User

Vincenzo di N

Rank

Wine geek

Posts

22

Joined

Mon Mar 02, 2009 12:44 pm

Location

Between Rome and Sarajevo in 2009

Re: AA Gill on food terroire...

by Vincenzo di N » Mon May 18, 2009 8:50 am

If we were gourmet deeply into our backbones and if we had the conditions to do it, we would eat only food directly linked to a terroir. We would refuse all the rest and classify it as laboratory produced. We would travel, directly to the source, only (or mainly) to taste that specific product or wine. We would know through that food or that wine the story of that people. We would enjoy Barolo or Brunello instead of whatever Supertuscan. We would eat Boletus edulis in Autumn, tomatoes in July and chicken of six months instead of those of 40 days. We would still have high cholesterol but can you imagine how higly educated our palate would be?

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 2 guests

Powered by phpBB ® | phpBB3 Style by KomiDesign