Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, welcoming foodies to discuss the dining scenes in Israel and abroad, along with all things related to kosher food.

Pastrami in Tel Aviv

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MarkC

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Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by MarkC » Tue Apr 27, 2010 4:40 pm

Another one of my Tel Aviv culinary alerts. Just had the first creditable deli style pastrami sandwich on rye in my fifteen years in Israel. The place is called Ruben, 122 Yehuda Ha Levi, just below Carlebach. The beer looked good, too.
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Daniel Rogov

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Daniel Rogov » Wed Apr 28, 2010 2:35 pm

Thanks for the post. I shall (for sure!!!) check this one out. Of all the things Israel has been missing it has indeed been a good pastrami sandwich on rye.

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Rogov
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Anthony Silverbrow

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Anthony Silverbrow » Thu May 06, 2010 12:54 pm

There's an article about Ruben's here: http://www.forward.com/articles/127820/.
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Edward G Robinson

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Edward G Robinson » Fri May 14, 2010 3:07 pm

Please tell me its Kosher?

If Authentic Kosher Deli is in the Holy Land, I'd expect to find Elijah waiting in line on his white donkey for his Pastrami on Rye, with a garlic pickle and Dr Brown's Cel-Ray ...
Where's your Rogov Now?
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Daniel Rogov

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Daniel Rogov » Fri May 14, 2010 3:18 pm

Eddie, Hi....

Dont know yet if its kosher. I passed by and did see a guy there on a white donkey though. Next week I'm there for sure to check it out.

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Jenise

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Jenise » Sat May 15, 2010 12:52 pm

Daniel Rogov wrote:Thanks for the post. I shall (for sure!!!) check this one out. Of all the things Israel has been missing it has indeed been a good pastrami sandwich on rye.

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Rogov


Daniel, I'm amazed--given the huge Jewish population of New York, which has been home to many of you--that pastrami has not been in Israel long ago. Why not, if you have an opinion?
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Daniel Rogov

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Daniel Rogov » Sat May 15, 2010 1:50 pm

Jenise, Hi......

Historical speculation....

(a) Towards the beginning of the state many of the Americans who came to Israel settled on the kibbutzim and the culinary modus operandi there was in the direction of simplicity and luxury foods were frowned upon. Those who settled in the cities adjusted largely to what we can think of as "light Middle-Eastern" cuisine as many of the traditional American/Jewish and European foods were simply too heavy for the weather of their new environment.

(b) Although "Jewish restaurants" (both Ashkenazi and Sepharadi) thrived for many years the socialist ethos of the new country had it as a near sin to spend too much food or time on food. Food was something to survive and not to enjoy. In that expensive dishes actuallly brought about guilt in people

(c) As to pastrami in particular, some idiot (I do not know to whom give credit) decided that because the young country was going through a period of rationing and shortages that pastrami would be made not from beef but from turkey and chicken breasts. If I were prime minister or a supreme court judge, I would of course declare that person a traitor not only to the Jewish people but to humanity in general.

(d) As when going to any new country, one of the perverse pleasures of many people is in having the ability to recall with fondness what used to be in "the old country" and in such cases not having those things available makes them even more rewarding to the memory (look for example at how I sometimes praise the pain de trois cent grammes of Paris or the egg creams of Brooklyn)

(e) Final reason - and I know some will disagree with me on this one, but with the exception of the Charolais beef that is raised on the Golan Heights, for many years most of the beef raised in this country was so bland and texture-retarded that I do not hesitate to use my daughter's description that it "sucked for wooden nickels". Israeli excels in high-tech, medical advancements and in other ways but we remain one of those backward nations that continues to believe that good beef can come from cows and not steers.

Happily, now that we have entered the 21st century, things are looking up in the culinary vein (we will not discuss politics here). If ever I do retire, one of the projects to which I shall devote myself is a book on the development of dining habits in ancient and modern Israel. Not a popular book mind but a quite academic one. I have even discussed the possibility of working with a young historian whose work I respect enormously.

As to pastrami on rye bread...this week will find me at the new place. I go with high hopes. if there is a God, only She knows what awaits me, but truth be told, I fear not the valley of the shadow of pastrami as New York City does remain intact.

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Rogov
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Avi Hein

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Re: Pastrami in Tel Aviv

by Avi Hein » Mon May 17, 2010 3:39 pm

Jenise wrote:
Daniel Rogov wrote:Thanks for the post. I shall (for sure!!!) check this one out. Of all the things Israel has been missing it has indeed been a good pastrami sandwich on rye.

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Rogov


Daniel, I'm amazed--given the huge Jewish population of New York, which has been home to many of you--that pastrami has not been in Israel long ago. Why not, if you have an opinion?


Much of what one thinks of as "Jewish food" is really New York or American food. And so, in fact, very little is in Israel. It wasn't until the 1970s that bagels, as we understand them in America, were introduced to Israel - and that, because of a visit to America by one, and one of Israel's main bagel chains, Holy Bagel, is owned by American immigrants to Israel.

Israel has lots of pickles - small and overly sweet, which I can't stand - , but truly lacks in the deli pickle that I grew up on [http://www.peapod.com/itemDetail_frame.jhtml?productId=22012&storeId=9&NUM=1274120882799. Of course, I keep on telling myself that I will make my own pickles, but it never happens.
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