Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, welcoming foodies to discuss the dining scenes in Israel and abroad, along with all things related to kosher food.
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Daniel Rogov

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People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Daniel Rogov » Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:36 pm

A good number of people have asked why I so often rave about Boeuf Bourguinon. Simple enough, even though this is a French country-style dish it is both outspoken and gentle; a dish that goes as well with a Burgundy red, a fine Pinot Noir or a fine Bordeaux red. More, this is a dish so good that the sauce generated in the cooking is so good that not "mopping it up" with good French, Italian or Greek country-style bread is an absolute sin.

Following are the recipes on which I most often rely for the two dishes.

Boeuf Bourguignon


2 lb (900 gr) lean beef
1/2 lb (225 gr) thick sliced bacon, diced
1 bottle dry red wine (ideally a mid-range Burgundy red)
1 cup beef stock
1 cup whole mushroom caps
1/4 cup Cognac or brandy
1 large onion, sliced
1 large carrot, sliced
5 Tbsp. butter
2 Ttbsp. each flour and olive oil
6 whole peppercorns
1 bouquet garn*
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 whole clove
pinch salt
1Tbsp. parsley, chopped, for garnish

In a glass or earthenware bowl make a marinade of the wine, brandy, onion, carrot, bouquet garni, garlic, peppercorns, clove, salt and olive oil. Cut the beef into 1 1/4" (3 cm) cubes and marinate these, covered and chilled for 24 - 36 hours, turning the meat occasionally.

Drain the beef, reserve the marinade and set the carrot and onion slices aside separately. Dry the beef on absorbent towelling.

In a flameproof casserole melt 3 Tbsp. of the butter and in this brown the beef a few pieces at a time. Add the bacon and sauté until browned but not crisp. Remove the bacon from the casserole and sauté first the onions and then the mushrooms until tender and lightly browned. Remove.

Discard the excess fat from the casserole and add 8 Tbsp. of the marinade. Bring to a boil and stir well, scraping the bottom of the casserole, to dissolve the pan juices. Pour into a small bowl and reserve.

In the same casserole melt the remaining butter and in this sauté the sliced onions and carrots until soft but not browned. Stir in the flour and cook, stirring continuously, until the mixture is a deep brown. Stir in the remaining marinade, the juices from the casserole, the stock and salt and pepper to taste. Return the beef to the casserole and bring to a boil. Cover tightly, reduce the flame and simmer until the meat is very tender (2 1/2 - 3 hours).

Transfer the beef to another flameproof casserole and strain the sauce over the beef. Add the bacon, onions and mushrooms and simmer until the onions are tender (about 15 minutes), stirring. Correct the seasoning. Cover and refrigerate for 24 - 48 hours. Before serving reheat in a medium oven and serve directly from the casserole. Immediately before serving sprinkle over the parsley. (Serves 4).


Note: If one is going to "go kosher" with this dish, substitute the bacon with fatty smoked goose breast and the butter with a mixture of 1/3 each olive oil, walnut oil and clarified parve margine.
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Joel D Parker

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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Joel D Parker » Thu Feb 03, 2011 9:10 am

Thanks Daniel, good timing.

I'm going to try a variation of this with lamb shoulder this weekend. Although it cannot be 'Boeuf' Bourguignon, it should be a tasty treat. The lamb came with quite a lot of fatty parts, which I'm going to use instead of either bacon or goose breast, though I'll have to remove the leftover pieces after cooking off the fat. Again, non-orthodox, but hopefully not complete blasphemy. My wife hates bacon, and I don't know where to find smoked goose breast in Tel Aviv, other than at a couple of kosher hamburger joints.

For mine, I chose 2007 Bouchard Père et Fils, Coteaux des Moines, Reserve. Accordingly, my recipe is minus one small glass of wine :wink:
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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Matilda L » Thu Feb 03, 2011 7:01 pm

I do love boeuf bourguingon. Haven't made it for years. I might make this recipe up next time we have a cool spell here.
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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Charlie Dawg » Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:17 pm

Thank you Daniel.
You are what you eat.
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David Raccah

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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by David Raccah » Fri May 06, 2011 10:32 pm

Daniel - is there a kosher version of this recipe that would work for you??
Checkout http://www.kosherwinemusings.com for my blogs on the world of kosher wines and follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/kosherwinemuse.
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Daniel Rogov

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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Daniel Rogov » Sat May 07, 2011 6:25 am

David, Hi...

Read the last two lines of the recipe above... 8)

Best
Rogov
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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by David Raccah » Wed Jul 27, 2011 3:24 am

Hello Daniel,

I do not have access to fatty smoked goose breast, any other ideas for what I can substitute that is a bit easier to get my hands on :(

Thanks!
David
Checkout http://www.kosherwinemusings.com for my blogs on the world of kosher wines and follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/kosherwinemuse.
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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Daniel Rogov » Wed Jul 27, 2011 4:31 am

David, Hi..

I grimace a bit but you might try a slab of kosher beef or turkey bacon. Be sure to leave the fat intact during cooking and eating. A bit less of a grimace perhaps, but consider high quality and thoroughly fatty kosher corned beef.
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Rogov
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David Raccah

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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by David Raccah » Wed Jul 27, 2011 11:56 am

AHHH!!! Life here in the Wild Wild West of the kosher world (northern California) does not allow for such access :oops: . So, we could do some nice salami - grimace away, or some fatty lamb, if I could find some. Not much else that can cook off a render both a flavor and an edible by product, without much cooking :( I have beef fry, but it is sliced pretty thing, will that work?

David
Checkout http://www.kosherwinemusings.com for my blogs on the world of kosher wines and follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/kosherwinemuse.
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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by David Raccah » Wed Jul 27, 2011 11:59 am

Also, most other recipes call for pearl onions and the like, do they mess with the consistency or flavor, or is it that you do not like pearl onion? :lol:
Checkout http://www.kosherwinemusings.com for my blogs on the world of kosher wines and follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/kosherwinemuse.
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Daniel Rogov

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Re: People Are Asking: What About Boeuf Bourguignon?

by Daniel Rogov » Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:37 pm

Pearl onion versus large sliced or quartered onion - matter of personal preference.

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