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Delicata Squash

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Carrie L.

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Delicata Squash

by Carrie L. » Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:21 pm

So I bought three of these babies to add to the gourds and pumpkins for my Thanksgiving centerpiece. Two of them survived, for quite awhile. I'm assuming that is because they were waxed.
Does anyone have experience with this winter squash? I made them last night by washing the outside, simply slicing in rounds, removing the seeds, then roasting (flat, without turning) with a little olive oil, salt and pepper. They were delicious, but the rind had an "off" flavor (wax?) so we avoided it. Does anyone have a good method for removing wax from fruit and veggies?
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Karen/NoCA » Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:26 pm

Carrie, these are popular at our grower's market and there is only one who offers Delicata. She claims it is the queen of the squashes. I like it very much. Of course, it would not have wax on it. It is not as sweet as other squashes, so goes well with bolder winter dishes. It is a good source of fiber and beta carotene. We like it halved, then put melted butter, mixed with fresh lime juice/zest with chili powder, s & P. in the cavities and bake. Good with maple syrup and melted butter, as well. :)
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Carl Eppig » Sun Dec 09, 2012 1:12 am

They are a staple in these parts. You fix them the same way as an acorn squash. You cut in half lengthwise, remove seeds, and bake face up with butter and seasonings. You don't eat the skin, so don't worry about the wax.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Carrie L. » Sun Dec 09, 2012 11:46 am

Karen/NoCA wrote:Carrie, these are popular at our grower's market and there is only one who offers Delicata. She claims it is the queen of the squashes. I like it very much. Of course, it would not have wax on it. It is not as sweet as other squashes, so goes well with bolder winter dishes. It is a good source of fiber and beta carotene. We like it halved, then put melted butter, mixed with fresh lime juice/zest with chili powder, s & P. in the cavities and bake. Good with maple syrup and melted butter, as well. :)


Karen, do you eat the skin then? Everything I've read says it's one winter squash in which the skin is completely edible.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Redwinger » Sun Dec 09, 2012 12:01 pm

NJ made some sourdough popovers to accompany dinner last nite. A fun change from the usual starch.
Some dumbass posted this to the wrong thread--sorry
Last edited by Redwinger on Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Fred Sipe » Sun Dec 09, 2012 1:44 pm

Here's a recipe I clipped somewhere about a month ago or so. But I haven't found any Delicata squash so I haven't tried it, sounds darn good though:

Baked Kale-Stuffed Delicata Squash

Ingredients

2 medium to large Delicata squashes, halved and seeds removed
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 medium apples, peeled, cored and finely chopped
2 medium to large leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned of
grit, split in half lengthwise, and sliced into 1/4-inch half moons
2 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 bunch kale, rinsed, thick stems removed, shredded (about loosely packed quarts
1 cup cottage cheese
2 eggs
3/4 cup packaged or fresh unseasoned breadcrumbs, plus more for topping
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for topping
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into 8 small cubes

Preparation

Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 375°F. Rub
squash with 1 tablespoon oil and lightly season with salt and pepper,
then lay on a baking sheet. If squash halves do not sit flat on baking
sheet, use a vegetable peeler to trim a strip or two away from the
bottom to allow them to lie flat. Bake until flesh is starting to turn
tender and a paring knife inserted shows just a little resistance,
about 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare the stuffing. Heat remaining olive oil in a large,
heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the
apples and leeks and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly
browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in the garlic, raisins and thyme.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Reduce
heat to medium, add kale, cover pan and cook, stirring occasionally,
until kale is mostly wilted, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer mixture to a
large bowl and let cool slightly. Season to taste with salt and
pepper.

Add cottage cheese, eggs, breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Mix well. Remove
squash from oven and divide filling evenly among 4 halves. Sprinkle
squash with additional breadcrumbs and Parmesan, and dot each squash
half with 2 cubes of butter. If you have any leftover stuffing, bake
it in a greased dish alongside. Return to oven and bake until squash
is tender and stuffing is nicely browned, about 30 more minutes.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Karen/NoCA » Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:27 pm

[quoteKaren, do you eat the skin then? Everything I've read says it's one winter squash in which the skin is completely edible.][/quote]

The grower told me that the skin is edible and yes I did eat it. It is good especially if roasted and on the crispy side, but I have also eaten it when soft cooked. Gene does not care for it. so he removes it.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Karen/NoCA » Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:31 pm

Fred Sipe wrote:Here's a recipe I clipped somewhere about a month ago or so. But I haven't found any Delicata squash so I haven't tried it, sounds darn good though:

Baked Kale-Stuffed Delicata Squash

Ingredients

2 medium to large Delicata squashes, halved and seeds removed
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 medium apples, peeled, cored and finely chopped
2 medium to large leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned of
grit, split in half lengthwise, and sliced into 1/4-inch half moons
2 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 bunch kale, rinsed, thick stems removed, shredded (about loosely packed quarts
1 cup cottage cheese
2 eggs
3/4 cup packaged or fresh unseasoned breadcrumbs, plus more for topping
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for topping
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into 8 small cubes

Preparation

Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 375°F. Rub
squash with 1 tablespoon oil and lightly season with salt and pepper,
then lay on a baking sheet. If squash halves do not sit flat on baking
sheet, use a vegetable peeler to trim a strip or two away from the
bottom to allow them to lie flat. Bake until flesh is starting to turn
tender and a paring knife inserted shows just a little resistance,
about 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare the stuffing. Heat remaining olive oil in a large,
heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the
apples and leeks and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly
browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in the garlic, raisins and thyme.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Reduce
heat to medium, add kale, cover pan and cook, stirring occasionally,
until kale is mostly wilted, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer mixture to a
large bowl and let cool slightly. Season to taste with salt and
pepper.

Add cottage cheese, eggs, breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Mix well. Remove
squash from oven and divide filling evenly among 4 halves. Sprinkle
squash with additional breadcrumbs and Parmesan, and dot each squash
half with 2 cubes of butter. If you have any leftover stuffing, bake
it in a greased dish alongside. Return to oven and bake until squash
is tender and stuffing is nicely browned, about 30 more minutes.


This recipe has so many flavors going on, I just can't imagine it paired with the Delicata. Delicata is very mild and you would certainly loose it with all these ingredients. Just my opinion, however. I love the Delicata prepared simply or any squash for that matter, with just a little something to enhance the lovely flavor of the individual squash. :)
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Jenise » Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:14 pm

I've had mixed experiences with delicata. If they all tasted like the last one I bought, no one would buy them. It was tasteless--I'm guessing underripe. And it wasn't the first time I was disappointed--few if any ever had as much flavor as an acorn, but they're pretty so I keep trying.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Jeff Grossman/NYC » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:15 pm

Not sure how to remove wax once it has been applied. Perhaps a vigorous scrub with a rough brush?

Anyway, delicata squashes are certainly well-liked around here. There is a resto near here that just slices them into coins -- as you did -- and bakes them into a tart shell. Not sure what the seasoning but the tart is savory so probably some mix of herbs and s+p.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Karen/NoCA » Sun Dec 09, 2012 9:21 pm

Jenise wrote:I've had mixed experiences with delicata. If they all tasted like the last one I bought, no one would buy them. It was tasteless--I'm guessing underripe. And it wasn't the first time I was disappointed--few if any ever had as much flavor as an acorn, but they're pretty so I keep trying.

I have been somewhat underwhelmed with them as well, Jenise, but I continue to buy them when I see them at the Farmer's Market. LIke you said, they are pretty and with the addition of savory ingredients and warm spices, and that crispy skin, I am a fan. Even with the acorn, there are times when they are just not up to standards. I like the flesh to be very dark orange and sometimes it is very pale. The pale ones have the least flavor.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Fred Sipe » Mon Dec 10, 2012 8:53 am

Jenise wrote:I've had mixed experiences with delicata. If they all tasted like the last one I bought, no one would buy them. It was tasteless--I'm guessing underripe. And it wasn't the first time I was disappointed--few if any ever had as much flavor as an acorn, but they're pretty so I keep trying.


Hmm, maybe that's why there is so much going on in that recipe I posted!
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Karen/NoCA » Mon Dec 10, 2012 2:16 pm

Fred Sipe wrote:
Jenise wrote:I've had mixed experiences with delicata. If they all tasted like the last one I bought, no one would buy them. It was tasteless--I'm guessing underripe. And it wasn't the first time I was disappointed--few if any ever had as much flavor as an acorn, but they're pretty so I keep trying.


Hmm, maybe that's why there is so much going on in that recipe I posted!

You have a point there Fred. I guess as with any food, you should eat it at the peak of it' flavor. There are a lot of summer squashes that I buy when very small. They sell like crazy at the Farmer's Markets and that is why I get there early....to get my share of those sweet babies. The winter squashes seem to hold for a longer time, with good flavor.
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Re: Delicata Squash

by Frank Deis » Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:01 am

Neighbors baked it, sliced thin, we ate it skin and all, thought it was good.

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