Growing/Processing Horseradish

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Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby GeoCWeyer » Wed Oct 23, 2013 1:42 pm

I have some horseradish planted in a large pot buried to ground level. I did this to prevent the spreading I had been warned about. The plant thrived this summer. Next spring I shall harvest some.

I already know about the gloves, face mask, and goggles needed in the processing. I do have a few questions:

How does one control the "heat" of the finished product? In the stores it comes in different intensities so it must be possible. I am thinking if all else fails to add some ground daikon radish to the mixture. Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Does anyone have any recipes of how to process and processing times to go along with recipes? How do I make it creamed?

I do know that one of my favorite things to do with it beside cocktail sauce is to mix it with a beaten egg and a little Parm and coat the outside of leg of lamb. The horseradish baked becomes sweet and nutty in flavor. Good on a bear roast as well, but done later in the roasting since the bear must be well done.
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Re: Horseradish

Postby Jenise » Wed Oct 23, 2013 6:41 pm

I cannot answer your questions but need all the same answers, as I have just inherited a pot of horseradish. I have no idea if it's ever been harvested or not, or even what it's growing habits are. Mark Willstatter, where are you!?!
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Barb Downunder » Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:35 am

Okay here is some useful info I have recorded over the years.. I love horseradish and fresh is great if somewhat tricky to deal with. Anyone ever grown wasabi?? I am going to try and get some wasabi root to try growing that as well.


Horseradish Preparation

1. To grate your own horseradish by hand, hold cleaned and trimmed horseradish root firmly. Using a sharp vegetable peeler, carefully remove the outer layer. Rub peeled horseradish root against a fine grating surface using downward, criss cross motion.
2. A quicker, more efficient method uses a blender. Wash and peel the root as you would a potato and dice it into small cubes. Place the cubes in the blender jar. Process not more that half a container load at a time. Add a small amount of cold water and crushed ice. Start with enough cold water to completely cover the blades of the blender. Add several crushed ice cubes. Put the cover on the blender before turning the blender on. If necessary, add more water or crushed ice to complete the grinding.
3. When the mixture reaches the desired consistency, add white vinegar. Use 2 to 3 tablespoons of white vinegar and 1/2 teaspoon of salt for each cup of grated horseradish. The time at which you add the vinegar is important. Vinegar stops the enzymatic action in the ground product and stabilizes the degree of hotness. If you prefer horseradish that is not too hot, add the vinegar immediately. If you like it as hot as can be, wait three minutes before adding the vinegar. Fresh horseradish roots may also be finely shaved or grated and added directly to a food. This simple method is frequently used by discriminating cooks. Fine shavings may also be placed in a dish of lemon juice to be served at the table.


Horseradish Cream

1 cup sour cream
2 Tbs grated fresh horseradish or drained prepared horseradish
1/8 tsp paprika
1 garlic clove, minced

1. Combine sour cream, horseradish, paprika and garlic in small bowl until well blended.Season to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 8 hours ahead. Cover and keep refrigerated.)

Creamy Horseradish Sauce

1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup freshly ground pure horseradish
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 tsp dry mustard
Generous dash of cayenne pepper

1. Whip cream with a mixer until it forms stiff peaks.

2. Gently fold in remaining ingredients.

Horseradish Mustard

1 cup dry mustard
1/4 cup honey
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup vinegar
1/4 cup oil
1 Tbs fresh lemon juice
1/4 tsp grated lemon peel
5 Tbs horseradish

1. Combine ingredients in a food processor or blender. Mix well. Jar and seal mustard. Age 2 to 8 weeks, then refrigerate.
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Thomas » Thu Oct 24, 2013 10:23 am

Thank you, Barb for the recipes, and thanks GeoC for asking the question.

My wife and I made the mistake ears ago of planting it in the ground...
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Jenise » Thu Oct 24, 2013 1:52 pm

And thanks from me, too.

Btw, a favorite: horseradish grated straight into mashed potatoes. YUM.
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby GeoCWeyer » Fri Oct 25, 2013 1:18 am

Barb, Thank you that was exactly the information I was seeking. I am looking forward to digging a piece of it up next spring and processing it. I am confidant that with the great information you provided that it will turn out well.
I love the life I live and live the life I love*, and as Mark Twain said, " Always do well it will gratify the few and astonish the rest".

*old blues refrain
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Mike Filigenzi » Fri Oct 25, 2013 9:29 am

Jenise wrote:And thanks from me, too.

Btw, a favorite: horseradish grated straight into mashed potatoes. YUM.


I have no idea of why I've not tried this. It sounds great.

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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Christina Georgina » Fri Oct 25, 2013 9:40 am

Barb's method is exactly how I process the root. No protective gear needed as long as you cover the blender, don't stick your nose in the container and work under or close to your range hood. It all comes together very quickly and the difference between this and commercial is amazing....you'll be finding a lot of uses.
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Karen/NoCA » Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:23 pm

I tried it once with a root given me, but then someone told me about Tule Lake Horseradish. It is almost a local product, grown in a tiny town just south of the Oregon border. They have their regular, creamy, Organic and I just saw a mix of horseradish and Wasabi. Excellent product, always very fresh, and it flies off the shelves here. I generally buy about 3 jars at once just to make sure I always have it available. Not only is it excellent on beef, but I use it when making deviled eggs, scrambled eggs, in sandwiches. It is excellent in a French Dip sandwich. I seem to recall that the Europeans caught on to horseradish a few years ago and the one remaining horseradish farm left in Tule Lake shipped a hefty amount over. I've tried other brands but there is no comparison. Tule Lake has the best product out there. It's rather addicting and the first thing I thing about when serving a beef roast, tri-tip, and even some braised recipes.
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 25, 2013 4:28 pm

Mike Filigenzi wrote:
Jenise wrote:And thanks from me, too.

Btw, a favorite: horseradish grated straight into mashed potatoes. YUM.


I have no idea of why I've not tried this. It sounds great.


Unbelievably awesome, especially with a slice of rare roast beef.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby GeoCWeyer » Sat Oct 26, 2013 1:57 pm

Karen/NoCA wrote: a mix of horseradish and Wasabi.
Thank you I am going to add some Wasabi to some of mine next spring. Sounds great!
I love the life I live and live the life I love*, and as Mark Twain said, " Always do well it will gratify the few and astonish the rest".

*old blues refrain
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Jenise » Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:15 pm

Barb Downunder wrote:Okay here is some useful info I have recorded over the years.. I love horseradish and fresh is great if somewhat tricky to deal with. Anyone ever grown wasabi?? I am going to try and get some wasabi root to try growing that as well.


Is Wasabi root being grown there? A long time ago--I was living in Alaska at the time so that's 20 or so years ago--I recall a magazine article about an operation in Oregon where they were growing wasabi, notably the first wasabi successfully grown outside of Japan. The rhyzomes need, or so it was believed at the time, a constant source of fresh running water and nobody had ever done it before. The operation was carefully guarded, as Japanese spies were nosing around trying to gain access to their method. When some came up for sale commercially, friends bought some so I got to taste it. It was wonderful. Night and day difference between that and the paste made from powdered horseradish that passes for 'wasabi'. A lot has probably been learned since and for all I know people are growing it in their own homes in acquariums or something. :)
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Karen/NoCA » Sat Oct 26, 2013 5:53 pm

Looks like wasabi is grown in your neck of the woods, Jenise.

http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/pnw0605/pnw0605.pdf
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Jenise » Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:39 pm

They at least know something about it, don't they? And they confirm the tale I told. What we don't know is who else is doing it.
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby GeoCWeyer » Wed Oct 30, 2013 2:02 pm

From what I have gathered from this string I think I will make both mild and hot horseradish next spring. I will also add some real Wasabi powder to some to use with sushi etc. It has to be better than that terrible artificial green stuff.
I love the life I live and live the life I love*, and as Mark Twain said, " Always do well it will gratify the few and astonish the rest".

*old blues refrain
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Jeff Grossman/NYC » Wed Oct 30, 2013 2:44 pm

GeoCWeyer wrote:...that terrible artificial green stuff.

Made-up but not quite artificial: it's made of horseradish, mustard, starch, and green food coloring.
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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby Mike Filigenzi » Wed Oct 30, 2013 11:49 pm

Jeff Grossman/NYC wrote:
GeoCWeyer wrote:...that terrible artificial green stuff.

Made-up but not quite artificial: it's made of horseradish, mustard, starch, and green food coloring.


And I have to say that I'm a sucker for it. It's not like real wasabi, but it adds that horseradish kick that's a bit like crystal meth for me.

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Re: Growing/Processing Horseradish

Postby GeoCWeyer » Fri Nov 01, 2013 1:02 am

Jeff Grossman/NYC wrote:
GeoCWeyer wrote:...that terrible artificial green stuff.

Made-up but not quite artificial: it's made of horseradish, mustard, starch, and green food coloring.


The green food coloring used contains F&D Yellow # 5. It is an artificial food coloring approved by F&D of which I am allergic. Tumeric, annatto(achiote) are both natural alternatives. Everyone who is allergic to aspirin is sensitive to it to some extent. It really should no longer be used but unfortunately it's use is widespread in the food industry. I will say it did cause me to become a "scratch" cook.
I love the life I live and live the life I love*, and as Mark Twain said, " Always do well it will gratify the few and astonish the rest".

*old blues refrain
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