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Pepper Mill discovery

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Jenise

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Pepper Mill discovery

by Jenise » Fri Mar 23, 2018 4:48 pm

Yesterday we had a late breakfast at a local restaurant who actually put pepper mills on each table. We were late enough that we could have ordered from the lunch menu, which I often do or try do even when it's 9 a.m. instead of 11 a.m.--you guys know how I feel about eggs, and I'm about equally averse to pancakes--so it's a miracle that for the first time in my entire life I actually ordered breakfast when I didn't have to, and a second miracle occurred when I didn't order a la carte--my other usual thing. Sick of my little phobias, I ordered a plate with a scrambled egg AND two buttermilk pancakes.

Third miracle: I put pepper on the egg.

And hence I discovered what was just about the best peppermill I've ever used. Does a beautiful coarse grind, which a lot of us prefer but find most mills don't do it well, and dispenses it prolifically.

It came from Chef Specialties in Pennsylvania. It's not a restaurant supply place as you'd think from that name, they only make pepper mills. And more importantly, they themselves make the grinding mechanism that's in most of the peppermills they sell. As explained to me just now by their representative Sue, the mechanisms include a heavy spring which insures that the mill stays where it's set (unlike my crappy Peugeot).

I just ordered two. If you're interested, do note that the description of each mill includes words like "Grinding mechanism from Pennsylvania." If 'Pennsylvania' isn't in that description, then it's an imported mill with a different mechanism. Btw Sue told me that all the wood mills are made and assembled here--it's mostly the acrylic and metal ones that are imported.

https://www.chefspecialties.com/

Note that there's a wine-bottle shaped 10" tall model in ebony wood on the Outlet for $30 ea. (That's what I chose.)
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Jeff Grossman

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Re: Pepper Mill discovery

by Jeff Grossman » Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:10 pm

I sympathize on the pancake front... who needs those? Did you know that the Borden family ate them on the morning of the day on which two of the family died? (The breakfast included "jonnycakes", coffee, bananas, and a several-days-old mutton stew that supposedly made everybody queasy but Lizzie, who didn't partake.)

But eggs, ah... Jenise, you're... wei... dam... unusual.

And we love you. :wink:
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Re: Pepper Mill discovery

by Jenise » Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:50 am

Jeff Grossman wrote:I sympathize on the pancake front... who needs those?


Pancakes are my very first food memory. I was 11 months old, strapped into a high chair on a camping trip to San Francisco. My grandmother, who probably made them, was along too and attempting to force feed me this soggy thing loaded with maple syrup, which was the worst thing I'd ever tasted. I was trying to spit them out, rather unsuccessfully as I recall. My next encounter was a sixth grade slumber party. Force-feeding wasn't involved but that experience was no more successful than the first. :) I can eat them now, but I'll never be a fan--and hold the syrup. :)
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Ken Schechet

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Re: Pepper Mill discovery

by Ken Schechet » Wed Apr 04, 2018 11:28 pm

Jenise wrote:(unlike my crappy Peugeot).


Jenise, I have a vague memory of you being pretty excited when you bought that crappy Peugeot pepper mill. Am I just dreaming this?

FYI, I recently bought a Cole & Mason salt and pepper set. It's early days, but I'm very happy with them. The salt grinder is excellent and my memory is that once when I used a Peugeot salt mill it was not very impressive. The pepper mill uses a completely different method than the Peugeot and when you grind the pepper you can smell it several feet away.
Ken
Lord, give me coffee to change the things I can change, and wine to accept the things I can't.
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Mike Filigenzi

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Re: Pepper Mill discovery

by Mike Filigenzi » Thu Apr 05, 2018 1:27 am

God, I am so with you on the pancakes. Even half a traditional pancake makes me feel like I've eaten a brick.

We have a salt and pepper grinder set for the table made by Willaim Bounds. Each has a stepped mechanism for fine, medium, and coarse grinds. They work fine although I wonder how long they'll last. If they die anytime soon, I'll check out the Chef Specialties ones.

For the kitchen, though, I'll never give up using a Unicom.
"People who love to eat are always the best people"

- Julia Child
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Jenise

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Re: Pepper Mill discovery

by Jenise » Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:32 pm

Ken Schechet wrote:
Jenise wrote:(unlike my crappy Peugeot).
Jenise, I have a vague memory of you being pretty excited when you bought that crappy Peugeot pepper mill. Am I just dreaming this?


Only if you might be misremembering anger as excitement. I didn't think it worked well at all. So I took it back to the kitchen store I bought it at and they had the temerity to tell me I was using the wrong pepper, that tellicherry is too large and Peugeot recommends malabar. I went ballistic, as you might imagine. But it was also true that the grinder i'd bought didn't even grind malabar well, so they replaced it. The one I have is better, but still not as good as the little German one I keep stove side. The German one has a lever you just grab and go round in circles. Can put a lot of pepper into a dish--just keep grinding, vs. the grab/twist/grab/twist repetition of the typical mill--fine for a salad, but laborious for grinding a larger quantity into a soup, say. The new one I got from these people, the wine bottle shape, is somewhere between the two. You gotta keep grabbing, but each grab is good for a 360 twist.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov

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