Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, welcoming foodies to discuss the dining scenes in Israel and abroad, along with all things related to kosher food.

How We Feel About Cabbage

Love it
7
54%
Can take it or leave it
6
46%
Would prefer to leave it
0
No votes
Can't stand it
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 13
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Daniel Rogov

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Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Daniel Rogov » Sat Jul 26, 2008 6:23 am

I have long known that babies (especially baby rabbits) come from cabbage patches. I have also long known that the combination of corned-beef and cabbage can be a feast for the gods. On the other hand, there are people who cannot tolerate the smell of cooked cabbage.

Simply stated, where do we stand on the cabbage issue? And if you do enjoy it, please list one or two of your favorite dishes and perhaps a recipe or two.
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Amy_Y_

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Amy_Y_ » Sat Jul 26, 2008 9:28 am

Finnish cabbage casserole or cabbage rolls ! Very delicious....

Yes, cabbage can be good, even the smell is not the best...

Recipe for the casserole:

* 1 small cabbage
* 2 tablespoons oil (I use butter)
* 300-400 g minced meat
* 2-3 onions
* (2-3 garlic cloves)
* 1 dl bouillon
* 1 teaspoons salt or to taste
* 1-2 tablespoons dark syrup
* 1 teaspoons peppercorns
* minced (or dried) marjoram
* white pepper
* (cream)

Method:
1. Shred / chop the cabbage and mince the onions and garlic.
2. Heat the oil in a frying pan and add the onion, garlic and some shredded cabbage.
3. Let it simmer adding more cabbage. Add the peppercorns as well.
4. Add the bouillon.
5. Put the mixture in a casserole and let it simmer wither on the hob or in you can put it in the oven. Add other ingredients.

The longer it it cooks, the better it tastes. Add water/cream when it looks dry. Stir at times.

We usually eat it with crushed lingonberries.

Not very kosher, thought (but I'm not Jewish either), I guess (if you do it my way...) :roll:

Some vegans use soya grains instead of minced meat.
Last edited by Amy_Y_ on Sat Jul 26, 2008 9:51 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Peter G

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Peter G » Sat Jul 26, 2008 9:44 am

cabbage can be heaven or hell depending on how it is cooked. I was brought up on English-style stewed boiled cabbage that tastes as bad as it smells. Life in France taught me the delight of parboiled sauteed cabbage with lardons and onions. If it is almost al dente and not overcooked, properly seasoned with some white pepper, it can be heavenly. Finnish cabbage rolls take it to a whole new dimension.
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Amy_Y_

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Amy_Y_ » Sat Jul 26, 2008 10:09 am

Peter asked me to add the recipe for cabbage rolls and here it is:

http://everything2.com/title/Finnish%25 ... %2520Rolls

The only exception os that I do not use barley or rice as I don't think that that stuff belongs to cabbage rolls (and it doesn't make them any better). Instead I use the finely chopped core of the cabbage and/or a plenty of chopped, wild mushrooms.
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Gamliel K

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Gamliel K » Mon Jul 28, 2008 11:52 am

I adore cabbage, but only when cooked. (Raw cabbage is somthing best left to feed the baby rabbits.)

As for favorite cabbage dishes:

Holishkes (meat and rice stuffed cabbage)
Corned beef and Cabbage
Hot meat Borscht
Cabbage stewed in lager and served on hot dogs

Gamliel
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Ryan M

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Ryan M » Mon Jul 28, 2008 12:28 pm

Can take it or leave it, depending mostly on how it is prepared. I will always take Sauerkraut. Cole Slaw depends on what form and my mood. Corned beef and cabbage always, but that given that it's a once a year thing. Overall though, in most contexts I like it.
"The sun, with all those planets revolving about it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else to do"
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Jenise

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Jenise » Mon Jul 28, 2008 1:29 pm

Got to agree with Peter G, most cooked cabbage is sadly overcooked and there's a beautiful place between raw and boiled where the cabbage is still crisp and the natural sugars brought out by heat have made it sweeter. Love it cold, sauteed, stir-fried or lightly poached in some kind of broth (corned beef and cabbage, as many have mentioned). Cabbage rolls are also a winner.

Probably the most different thing I do with it is to place a slice of goats milk cheese (and sometimes fresh dill, garlic or chopped green olives) in the center of a leaf steamed to the pliant stage, which is then folded up into a square packet, then run through flour, egg and breadcrumbs and pan-fried to golden brown on each side. Makes a brilliant, contrasting garnish for a classic charcroute.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Robert Reynolds

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Robert Reynolds » Mon Jul 28, 2008 10:59 pm

raw cabbage is good in cole slaw, a time-honored picnic side that I love.
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Matilda L

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Matilda L » Tue Jul 29, 2008 8:18 am

Poor old cabbage is one of the most abused and misunderstood vegetables around. Treated with respect, it is delicious. Treated badly (eg, boiled to blazes) it is disgusting.

A favourite way of preparing it, to add to the recipes:

Use a large saucepan with a tight-fitting lid.
1 medium onion, finely sliced: saute in a generous amount of butter over medium heat.
As it starts to look transparent and soft, add a green cooking apple, with the core cut out but the peel still on if you like, chopped up into small thin pieces.
Shred half a cabbage finely, and add to the pan. Toss the butter, onion and apple through it, so all the cabbage is coated.
Add a heaped tablespoon of dark brown sugar, and a hefty slug of malt vinegar. (That's a technical term; half a cup might be ok. Put in more if you think it needs it.)
Put the lid on the saucepan, and cook slowly over low heat, stirring every so often to stop it catching and burning.

Nice to eat with sausage, veal or chicken. Tastes good the second day, too.

Matilda
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Amy_Y_

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by Amy_Y_ » Tue Jul 29, 2008 2:31 pm

Matilda L wrote: Tastes good the second day, too.

Matilda



Yes, it is true. This applies also to the cabbage casserole and cabbage rolls - what a strange vegetable....
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EY Han

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Re: Culinary Poll #002: Babies in the Cabbage Patch

by EY Han » Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:58 pm

Ryan Maderak wrote:Can take it or leave it, depending mostly on how it is prepared. I will always take Sauerkraut. Cole Slaw depends on what form and my mood. Corned beef and cabbage always, but that given that it's a once a year thing. Overall though, in most contexts I like it.


Ryan, I agree 100% with your assessment of cabbage. In fact, there used to (under different management now?) one Falafel joint in Tel Aviv (Frischmann Falafel) that I used to love to patronize as one out of many things they did well was serve actual Sauerkraut. I'm starting to have a craving right now actually…

Another thing I love is steamed cabbage alongside Chinese steamed dumpling rolls ("Bowzuh" [?]).

Best wishes,
E.Y.

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