Everything about food, from matching food and wine to recipes, techniques and trends.

Fish question

Moderators: Jenise, Robin Garr, David M. Bueker

User avatar
User

Howie Hart

Rank

The Hart of Buffalo

Posts

5953

Joined

Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:13 pm

Location

Niagara Falls, NY

Fish question

by Howie Hart » Sat Jul 01, 2006 9:45 am

I like fish, but am only familiar with haddock (usually battered and fried), salmon, swordfish, perch, trout and yellow pike. However, for NiagarCOOL I purchased a 10 lb. box of frozen red snapper fillets and a 10 lb. box of ocean perch fillets. Due to limited turnout, I only cooked part of the perch and none of the red snapper. Athough partially thawed, I returned them to my freezer and have been eating the rest of the perch (sealed in portion sized bags) for evening dinners, pan fried with butter, dill, lemon, etc. (and a glass or two of Riesling, of course). However, I've never cooked red snapper. Any suggestions?
User avatar
User

John Tomasso

Rank

Too Big to Fail

Posts

1188

Joined

Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:27 pm

Location

Buellton, CA

Re: Fish question

by John Tomasso » Sat Jul 01, 2006 10:38 am

You could poach it in salsa, a la Vera Cruz.

Onions, tomatoes, cilantro, salt, pepper, garlic, some serrano or jalapeno chiles, get it all going in a saute pan and then just lay the filets on top, and spoon the mixture over them during cooking.

You could also do them piccata style, with lemon, butter and capers.
User avatar
User

Randy Buckner

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1725

Joined

Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:46 pm

Location

Puget Sound

Re: Fish question

by Randy Buckner » Sat Jul 01, 2006 1:58 pm

You can cook Red Snapper just like Redfish (Red Drum), which is a Louisiana favorite -- Blackened Redfish.

There are a million recipes -- might even find one in that old fart's cookbook who hangs around here. :wink:

1 lb. redfish or red snapper fillets
3 Tbsp butter, melted
1 Tbsp Pepper Mixture

Pepper Mixture:

1 Tbs onion powder
1 Tbs garlic powder
1 Tbs dried thyme, crushed
1 Tbs ground white pepper
1 Tbs ground red (cayenne) pepper
1 Tbs ground black pepper
1 Tbs Hungarian paprika
½ Tbs salt
Some recipes also use basil and oregano

Preparation:

Prepare pepper mixture, combining all ingredients. Brush fish with melted butter and coat fillets on both sides with pepper mixture. Place a cast iron skillet directly over a hot burner. Heat for several minutes or until a drop of water vaporizes in skillet. Add fish to skillet, thickest pieces first. Drizzle with the remaining butter. Cook, uncovered, 2-3 minutes per side for ½ to ¾ inch fillets, or 3-4 minutes for 1 inch thick fillets. It gets smoky, so have good ventilation.

You can store the pepper mixture in a small Tupperware container for future use.
no avatar
User

ChefCarey

Re: Fish question

by ChefCarey » Wed Jul 05, 2006 7:22 am

I resemble that remark! And, yes, there are several in *both* books which would work quite well. :)
User avatar
User

Howie Hart

Rank

The Hart of Buffalo

Posts

5953

Joined

Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:13 pm

Location

Niagara Falls, NY

Re: Fish question

by Howie Hart » Wed Jul 05, 2006 3:06 pm

I think I'll give this a try, but I'm going to be too busy to do any serious cooking for a few weeks, so I'll report back when I do. BTW - is a Red Drum similar to a Freshwater Drum, also called Sheephead and common to the Great Lakes?
no avatar
User

TimMc

Re: Fish question

by TimMc » Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:14 am

John Tomasso wrote:You could poach it in salsa, a la Vera Cruz.

Onions, tomatoes, cilantro, salt, pepper, garlic, some serrano or jalapeno chiles, get it all going in a saute pan and then just lay the filets on top, and spoon the mixture over them during cooking.

You could also do them piccata style, with lemon, butter and capers.


John,

That just sounds seriously good!
User avatar
User

Randy Buckner

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1725

Joined

Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:46 pm

Location

Puget Sound

Re: Fish question

by Randy Buckner » Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:47 am

... is a Red Drum similar to a Freshwater Drum


I don't think so, but I'm no fish expert. I know we considered drum to be scrap fish in Oklahoma and threw them back.
User avatar
User

Howie Hart

Rank

The Hart of Buffalo

Posts

5953

Joined

Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:13 pm

Location

Niagara Falls, NY

Re: Fish question

by Howie Hart » Thu Jul 06, 2006 8:16 am

Randy Buckner wrote:I know we considered drum to be scrap fish in Oklahoma and threw them back.

Well, thats what we do with Sheephead too.
no avatar
User

ChefCarey

Re: Fish question

by ChefCarey » Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:43 pm

Technical term is "trash" fish. What is a trash fish?

Any fish for which a maket and palate have not yet been developed. These change quite a bit over the years.

I attended a very interesting seminar years ago put on by the Florida Dept of Fish and Game. That was what the entire seminar was about. This was a meeting of local Amercan Culinary Federation presidents from all over the country, so we had quite a few questions.

One man's trash is another's treasure.
User avatar
User

Randy Buckner

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1725

Joined

Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:46 pm

Location

Puget Sound

Re: Fish question

by Randy Buckner » Thu Jul 06, 2006 10:06 pm

That's the word I meant -- trash fish. Hear what I mean, not what I say, you old coot. :wink:
User avatar
User

Bill Spencer

Rank

Ultra geek

Posts

429

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:03 pm

Location

Yuma, Arizona

Snapper

by Bill Spencer » Fri Jul 07, 2006 1:36 pm

John Tomasso wrote:You could poach it in salsa, a la Vera Cruz.

You could also do them piccata style, with lemon, butter and capers.


%^)

Hey John !

Kathleen and I do your "piccata style" a lot ... but my favorite way to eat red snapper is as "fish and chips" ... correct me if I'm wrong but isn't most of the "fish and chips" in Morro Bay and along the Central California coast red snapper ? I know that's what they tell us at The Fish Bowl ... it sure is juicy and tender ! And a $10 bottle of Firestone chardonnay to go with it ain't bad either !

Clink !

%^)
"If there are no dogs in heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went !" - Anonymous

Napa is for auto parts, Paso is for wine !

Bill Spencer (Arizona Wine Lover)

Lemon Recipes - http://www.associatedcitrus.com/recipes.html
no avatar
User

ChefCarey

Re: Fish question

by ChefCarey » Fri Jul 07, 2006 2:26 pm

Randy Buckner wrote:That's the word I meant -- trash fish. Hear what I mean, not what I say, you old coot. :wink:


Ah, yes, I remember fondly the days when I was a young coot...
User avatar
User

Ian Sutton

Rank

Spanna in the works

Posts

3652

Joined

Sun Apr 09, 2006 3:10 pm

Location

Norwich, UK

Re: Fish question

by Ian Sutton » Fri Jul 07, 2006 4:09 pm

A standard oven bake for us is lime juice and zest, with finely chopped peppers (red , yellow or orange work well for colour), finely chopped or grated ginger and usually finely chopped red onion. Other stuff can go in as required, but bright colours tends to be the theme.

Cover with foil and bake for 10-30 minutes depending on the size of the fish.

regards

Ian
User avatar
User

Linda R. (NC)

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1160

Joined

Sun Jul 09, 2006 5:09 pm

Location

North Carolina

Re: Fish question

by Linda R. (NC) » Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:54 pm

You can use snapper in almost any recipe calling for mild white fish. Here is one I've used several times.

Baked Snapper with Chipotle Butter

½ tsp. ground cumin
½ tsp. paprika
¼ tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. black pepper
4 6-oz. red snapper filets (or other whitefish filets)
Cooking spray
1 Tb. butter, softened
1 canned chipotle chile pepper in adobo sauce, finely minced
Lemon wedges

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine first 4 ingredients, sprinkle evenly over fish. Place fish on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray, bake 15 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork. While fish bakes, combine butter and chile pepper. Spread butter mixture evenly over fish. Serve with lemon wedges.

- Cooking Light Magazine – May 2003
User avatar
User

MikeH

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1165

Joined

Thu Mar 30, 2006 12:07 am

Location

Cincinnati

Re: Fish question

by MikeH » Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:10 am

Randy Buckner wrote:
... is a Red Drum similar to a Freshwater Drum


I don't think so, but I'm no fish expert. I know we considered drum to be scrap fish in Oklahoma and threw them back.


My cousin lived in Slidell, Louisiana. He moaned that redfish was at one time a pretty cheap fish. Then us Yankees discovered blackened redfish and the price jumped enormously! He wasnt interested in my counter that it was one of his local boys, Paul Prudhomme, that made blackened redfish so popular.

Like Chef Carey said, trash fish changes.
Cheers!
Mike
User avatar
User

Larry Greenly

Rank

Resident Chile Head

Posts

4208

Joined

Sun Mar 26, 2006 12:37 pm

Location

Albuquerque, NM

Re: Fish question

by Larry Greenly » Thu Jul 13, 2006 11:13 am

MikeH wrote:
Randy Buckner wrote:
... is a Red Drum similar to a Freshwater Drum


I don't think so, but I'm no fish expert. I know we considered drum to be scrap fish in Oklahoma and threw them back.


My cousin lived in Slidell, Louisiana. He moaned that redfish was at one time a pretty cheap fish. Then us Yankees discovered blackened redfish and the price jumped enormously! He wasnt interested in my counter that it was one of his local boys, Paul Prudhomme, that made blackened redfish so popular.

Like Chef Carey said, trash fish changes.


Lobsters used to be trash "fish." In fact, they were as plentiful as cockroaches and they used to grind them up for fertilizer. They were for poor folks to eat. Ahh, for at least this one facet of the good ol' days.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Jenise, Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests

Powered by phpBB ® | phpBB3 Style by KomiDesign