Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

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Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Mon Apr 20, 2009 5:49 pm

On a fairly regular basis people discuss the various grapes that may prove most appropriate to Israel's various climates and soils. One of the grapes that is invariably mentioned (as it was on another thread but I am reposting here in order that it may start a discussion) is Cabernet Franc. Indeed, Cabernet Franc has been producing some splendid rose wines locally and indeed it is an important blending agent for may of the country's very best wines. Some feel that the grape will not do well here in producing a varietal wine.

I may be in a distinct minority but I beg to disagree, wondering in fact whether Cabernet Franc will not become to Israel as Malbec has to Argentina, as Sauvignon Blanc has to New Zealand and, as a more classic example, as Sangiovese has to Italy.

I cannot help but think that the wines reviewed below support my hypothesis…. As always, agreement or disagreement are equally invited and welcome.

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Amphorae, Cabernet Franc, 2004: Deep garnet with bright raspberry and plum flavors, this dark, rich and plush wine shows thick, earthy tannins and gamy currant and cedarwood aromas and flavors. Perhaps not elegant but certainly powerful and complex. Drink now–2012. Score 90.

Ben Hanna, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Medium to full-bodied, with velvety smooth tannins and appealing floral-scented plum, blueberry and currant fruits on a gentle background of spicy wood and just the barest hint of Brett to add charm. Drink from release–2011. Tentative Score 89–91.

Ben Hanna, Cabernet Franc, La Mariée, 2005: Broad, dense and concentrated, yet caressing and not at all heavy. Opens with generous raspberries and dried currants highlighted by gentle black and red chili peppers. Moves on to plum and floral aromas and flavors with soft tannins rising on the long, spicy and fruit-rich finish. Best yet from the winery. Best 2008–2011. Score 91.

Carmel, Regional, Cabernet Franc, Upper Galilee, 2007: With grapes from the Netua and Alma vineyards in the Upper Galilee, developed for 10 months in oak, some new and some used. Blended with 8% of Petit Verdot and 7% Malbec, a medium- to full-bodied, deep garnet wine showing soft tannins and gentle spicy oak influences integrating nicely and opening to show red fruits and vanilla as well as a clear cigar box note. Drink now-2012. Score 90. K

Royal Reserve, Cabernet Franc, 2007: This could be a textbook Loire Valley Cabernet Franc, especially when one considers the area of Chinon. Smooth and velvety, with plenty of tannins, but those soft and gently mouth-coating and opening to show black cherry, currant, blueberry and tobacco notes, those complemented by hints of tobacco. As this one develops look for hints of green olives and briar. Drink from release–2013. Tentative Score 90–92.

Royal Reserve, Cabernet Franc, 2005: Subtle and seductive, with generous tannins integrating nicely. On the nose and palate fresh currant, dark berry and black cherry fruits matched nicely by bell peppers, cigar box and lead pencil notes. Good length, depth and a distinct note of elegance. Drink now–2011. Score 90.

Royal Reserve, Cabernet Franc, Limited Edition, 2003: Full-bodied, earthy and aromatic with an appealing array of currant, plum and wild berry fruits, those backed up nicely by vanilla and spices from the oak as well as an appealing hint of earthiness on the moderately long finish. Rich and concentrated. Drink now. Score 90.

Ella Valley Vineyards, Cabernet Franc, 2007: Blended with 5% each of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, dark royal purple, medium- to full-bodied with softly caressing tannins. Opens with a distinct veggie Cabernet Franc note, that yielding comfortably to cherry, blackberry, licorice and citrus peel on the long and generous finish. Drink now-2013. Score 90. K

Ella Valley Vineyards, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Blended with 3% each of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, dark, dark-garnet in color, medium to full-bodied, deeply aromatic and showing a generous array of blackberry, black cherry and currant notes. Long, round, rich and mouth-filling. Drink now–2012. Score 92. K

Ella Valley Vineyards, Cabernet Franc, 2005: Blended with 12% of Merlot, oak-aged for 15 months, this dark garnet, medium to full-bodied wine shows appealing vegetal aromas on first attack, those parting to reveal gently spicy cedarwood, raspberries, blackberries, red currants and generous hints of herbaceousness and white chocolate that come in on the long, well-balanced finish. Drink now–2011. Score 91. K

Ella Valley Vineyards, Cabernet Franc, 2004: Intensely dark royal purple, opens with a somewhat funky and loamy nose but that passes quickly and reveals a medium- to full-bodied wine, on the showing appealing red fruits, those supported nicely by notes of vanilla and cinnamon. From mid-palate on notes of cigar box and traditional Cabernet Franc veggie notes. Long and generous. Drink now-2011. Score 91. K

Gvaot, Cabernet Franc, Gofna Reserve, 2007: As predicted at an early tasting. the best yet from this winery. Medium- to full-bodied, opening with notes of freshly turned earth and loam, those opening to reveal black and blue berries along with spicy and toasty oak notes. Firm tannins but with fine balance and structure, a simultaneously muscular and elegant wine. Drink now-2012. Score 90. K

Margalit, Cabernet Franc, 2007: Still a baby and because of that not yet showing its full charms but with already revealing remarkable promise. Full-bodied, with gently mouth-coating tannins, opens to reveal traditional Cabernet Franc "greenness", that yielding comfortably to blackberry, blueberry and cassis fruits, those complemented by notes of sweet peppers, green olives and an appealing note of garrigue. Give this one time to show its elegance. Best 2011-2018, perhaps longer. Score 93.

Margalit, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Dark garnet toward royal-purple, medium to full-bodied. Blended with 5% of Cabernet Sauvignon and showing rich black currant, cherry and blackberry fruits matched nicely by floral and light earthy aromas and flavors, all coming to a long, round and caressing finish. Drink now–2015. Score 92.

Margalit, Cabernet Franc, 2005: Dark cherry toward garnet and full-bodied, this round and polished wine shows abundant blackberry, currant and black cherry fruits, those matched nicely by hints of spices and cedarwood, all leading to a long, generously tannic finish. Elegant and faithful to the variety. Drink now–2013. Score 92.

Margalit, Cabernet Franc, 2004: Deeply fragrant, this full-bodied wine was blended with 12% Cabernet Sauvignon. Silky-smooth tannins, black and red fruits, hints of tobacco and chocolate come together on a long, mouth-filling finish with an appealing hint of freshly turned earth. Drink now–2011. Score 90.

Margalit, Cabernet Franc, 2003: Almost impenetrable deep purple, full-bodied, with excellent balance between soft, luxurious tannins and a tempting array of dark plum, wild berry and herbal aromas and flavors. Oak-aged, with the addition of 10% Cabernet Sauvignon, the wine is mouth-filling and long, showing a tantalizing hint of mint on the finish. Drink now–2012. Score 90.

Pelter, T-Selection, Cabernet Franc, 2007: Medium- to full-bodied, showing generous but not overpowering oak and firm chewy tannins that need time to settle in. On the nose and palate blueberries, raspberries and fresh herbs and, in the background an appealing floral note. Long and generous. Best 2011-2014. Score 92.

Pelter, T-Selection, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Ruby toward royal-purple in color, full-bodied, with silky tannins and a gentle hand with the oak. Showing gorgeous plum, blackberry and floral aromas and flavors on a background of sweet spices and, coming in on the finish, a tempting hint of semi-sweet chocolate. Long and generous. Drink now–2012. Score 92.

Pelter, T-Selection, Cabernet Franc, 2005: This full-bodied wine reflects its 14 months in new French oak with spicy wood and mouth-coating tannins, both integrating nicely. A generous array of black fruits on first attack, those opening to reveal overlays of fresh Mediterranean herbs, and finally, on the long finish, espresso coffee, dark chocolate and the barest but tantalizing hint of crushed raspberries. Drink now–2013. Score 92.

Pelter, T-Selection, Cabernet Franc, 2004: Deep, almost impenetrable in color, lush and elegant with a rich array of ripe raspberry, cassis and berry fruits, those matched nicely by herbal and bittersweet chocolate aromas and flavors. Firm tannins, especially on the finish, but with just the right levels of French oak influence and both balance and structure that bode well for the future. Drink now–2012. Score 91.

Pelter, T-Selection, Cabernet Franc, 2003: Oak-aged for 14 months in new French barriques. Smooth, rich and supple, with ripe plum, currant and berry fruits together with an array of mocha, tobacco and espresso coffee, all complemented nicely by a hint of vanilla-scented oak. Tannins and fruits rise on the finish. Showing its elegance nicely. Drink now–2012. Score 90.

Psagot, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Medium-dark ruby toward garnet in color, medium-bodied, with soft, gently caressing tannins and appealing spicy oak. Showing appealing red currant and raspberry fruits on a background of earthy minerals and herbs and saddle leather. Drink now-2010.. Score 88. K

Recanati, Reserve, Cabernet Franc, 2006: With its once-firm tannins now integrating nicely, showing medium-dark garnet, full-bodied, and reflecting its 14 months in oak with generous but not imposing sweet cedar. Dark berry, black cherry and plum fruits highlighted by notes of tobacco, bell peppers and bittersweet chocolate, all lingering nicely on the finish. Drink now–2012. Score 91. K

Tanya, Halel, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Made entirely from Cabernet Franc grapes, developed in barriques for 14 months, dark, almost impenetrable garnet in color, a medium- to full-bodied, softly tannic wine. On first attack notes of plums, tar and bittersweet chocolate, those yielding to aromas and flavors of blackcurrants and espresso coffee, all with a comfortable overlay of black pepper. Long and generous. Drink now-2012. Score 90. K

Tishbi, Estate, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Dark garnet in color, full-bodied and with chewy tannins, a well focused wine, its spicy (almost peppery) wood settling down nicely to show a fine array of currant and blackberry fruits, those with an appealing leathery overtone. Long and satisfying. Best 2009-2012. Score 89. K

Tulip, Mostly, Cabernet Franc, 2006: A blend of 86% Cabernet Franc and 7% each of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Showing spicy oak and firm tannins now integrating well. Opens to show red and black berries, green pepper and earthy aromas and flavors. On the moderately long finish appealing hints of licorice and mint. Drink now–2012. Score 88.

Vitkin, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Ripe and polished, a blend of 86% Cabernet Franc and 14% Petit Verdot. Aged in new French oak for 15 months and showing gentle near-sweet cedar notes along with soft tannins that are integrating nicely. On the nose and palate currants and black cherries, those parting to reveal notes of toasted white bread, figs and tobacco. On the long and mouth-filling finish floral and mocha hints. Drink now–2013. Score 91.

Vitkin, Cabernet Franc, 2005: Deep garnet toward royal-purple, oak-aged for 16 months and blended with 12% Petit Verdot, the wine offers up generous tannins integrating nicely with the wood. Already showing an abundant array of spicy black cherries and currants, those with overtones of Madagascar green peppercorns, herbs and smoked meat. Long and satisfying. Drink now–2011. Score 90.

Vitkin, Cabernet Franc, 2004: Deep, almost impenetrable royal-purple in color, this blend of 90% Cabernet Franc and 10% Petit Verdot shows fine balance between wood, moderately firm tannins and vegetal-fruity characteristics. On first attack pepper and spicy wood, that followed by black currants, plum and blackberry fruits, all supported by hints of cloves, Oriental spices and, on the long and mouth-filling finish, Mediterranean herbs. Drink now–2011. Score 90.

Yatir, Cabernet Franc, 2006: Deep royal-purple, full-bodied, and showing faithful to the variety with complex black cherry, blackberry and cassis fruits accented by spices, cedarwood, coffee and hints of tar and vanilla. Drink now–2011. Score 90. K
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Eli R » Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:04 pm

Daniel, Hi,

I am 100% with you on this one. Although you did mention "greenness" once (on the very young 07 Margalit), none of the other wines can be charecterized in my view as typical "green" Cabernet Franc. I did taste several and lately have been collecting most of the hi-end new releases.
I do hope time will show they will all mature gracefully.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:12 pm

Eli, Hi.....

With regard to aging, worth keeping mind that many of the Cabernet Franc vineyards are still quite young and although they will produce fine wines those will not yet be for long-term cellaring. There are, however, exceptions and you will find my own predicted drinking windows in the tasting notes above. As the vines become more mature, I expect those windows to expand considerably.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby David Raccah » Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:23 pm

I crazy agree as well. That said, what about Gush Tzion, Tanya, Zemora? Others?
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:31 am

David, Hi...


I believe the above list is inclusive of all the wineries currently producing varietal Cabernet Franc wines that earned over 85 points. Tanya, you will notice, is listed; I do not believe Gush Etzion has released a varietal of this nature; and I did not include Zemora becuse for all practical purposes, that winery no longer exists.


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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Ido GalOn » Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:09 am

I don't know if to say I am agreeing or not but it is one of the grapes I love drinking and watching the progress of the wines.

In the end, time will tell.
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby David Raccah » Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:11 am

I will have to check but a buddy of mine has promised a bottle of Gush Etzion Cab Franc that he brought from Israel for my Cab Franc night - that I have been planning for some time now. By the way, what is a good pairing (food wise) for these wines?

Thanks!
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:22 am

David, Hi....

Right ye be. My tasting note for the wine in question follow.

As to food pairing - with many of the wines listed above I would go for either large or small cuts of beef or lamb (roastbeef, leg of lamb, lamb shops, T-bone, Portherhouse or other steaks). Also if you're doing a major tasting with the food consider potatoe puree, that perhaps spooned over with the natural juices of the meat being prepared.

Best
Rogov


Gush Etzion, Cabernet Franc, 2005: Dark ruby toward garnet, medium to full-bodied, with aromas and flavors of tar, bittersweet chocolate and spices overlaying blackberry and black currant fruits. On the long finish appealing hints of mint. Drink now–2011. Score 89. K
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Michael J » Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:16 am

I wasn't aware that Yatir produced a Franc varietal. Is this new?
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:58 am

Michael J wrote:I wasn't aware that Yatir produced a Franc varietal. Is this new?



Michael, Hi.....

I believe that to date the wine was released as a varietal only from the 2006 vintage. There is Cabernet Franc being aged now from the 2007 and 2008 vintages but to the best of my knowledge, not known whether those will be blending agents or released as varietals.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Ian Sutton » Tue Apr 21, 2009 12:30 pm

Now here's the crunch question (as much for the producers to mull over, as for seeking a current answer). What would you say does (or could) mark these out as uniquely (or at least typically) Israeli?

With Argentina, their malbec offered perhaps a softer wine that historic champions of the grape in South of France. With NZ, Sauvignon Blanc offered a piercing clarity (some would say parody - but not me) of style.

Are these wines especially fragrant? (a typically enticing feature of Cab Franc)
Do they show rare depth, or a lightness and balance?

Are they flexible food wines, in ways that many other wines aren't?
Are their mavericks out there pushing the style in a new direction? Are specific oak treatments carving a different style?

Reading through the TNs it appears there are indeed different styles at play, perhaps different schools of thought. One or two that sounds like 'internationally styled' reds with dark fruits , good extract and notable use of timber. For me these may be fine and successful wines, but I'm not sure they promote the grape with distinction (it depends if the grape can still exert it's personality). The Vitkins (to pick one winery out semi random) sound very appetising and perhaps suggest something offering something distinctive.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Josh Patt » Tue Apr 21, 2009 12:51 pm

I agree with Ian that we need to develop something unique with a style that's different than what's already out there. We're not just looking for a variety that is appropriate, but for a variety that can create a unique wine in Israel.

It's too early to tell if Cabernet Franc will be the variety that makes it big in Israel. As a varietal, I think that Syrah is producing better wines at the moment, though there are probably more mature Syrah vinyards than Cabernet Franc.

As a blending agent I'm sure that Cabernet Franc has a lot to add, though both Petit Sirah and Petit Verdot are IMHO showing promise as blending agents in Israel, and in a few individual cases as varietal wines also. Petit Verdot is just recently being tried in Israel, where it doesn't have the late ripening problem that it has in Bordeaux, so we don't know how much potential it has here - it could surprise us.

Bottom line, we need another decade or two of experimentation and learning until we find out what works best.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Apr 21, 2009 12:52 pm

Ian, Hi….

Important to remember that we are talking here of mostly still quite young vineyards and of ongoing experimentation and, indeed as well playfulness on the part of various winemakers. Considering that, my response is tentative and in that indeed both hopeful and optimistic.

I would propose that as Cabernet Franc makes its way in Israel it will indeed prove to show a fine sense of balance between the moderate use of wood, generous but soft and gently mouth-coating tannins and fruits. I do perceive the wines as becoming increasingly fragrant and perhaps showing both on the nose and palate hints of garrigue as well as of herbaceousness – defining herbaceousness in this case as a kind of gentle "greenness" that can so well represent the wines of the Mediterranean basin (think Chateau Musar if you will).

As to oak – much of course will depend on individual winemakers but my guess is that many will realize that what I am calling "Mediterranean flavors" will be overpowered by too-generous oak. I see a good deal of light- to medium-toasted oak coming in here, much of that French (Allier perhaps leading the way). Fear not – oak and internationalism will drop by the wayside as the grape continues to demonstrate its versatility.

As to food matches – flexible indeed – being appropriate for both large and small cuts especially of beef, lamb and mutton, game birds, and indeed especially attuned to North African, Provencal and Mediterranean cuisine. With somewhat lighter versions, I have already found some of these wines to be quite appropriate with not-fatty grilled fish (e.g. grouper) and indeed with many pasta dishes. Especially enjoyed the Vitkin recently with a lasagna al forno.

I am, by the way, now in somewhat of a hold pattern ….writing a column for my newspaper about this very issue but waiting to hear from Victor Shoenfeld, the winemaker of the Golan Heights Winery. Although Shoenfeld (undoubtedly the most talented winemaker in the country) has used Cabernet Franc as a blending agent, he has yet to release a varietal Cabernet Franc. I am most curious to hear his opinion, one that I respect enormously. After talking with him, I shall report back…

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby David Raccah » Tue Apr 21, 2009 1:00 pm

Hey Daniel!

Than ks for the info. I have many Francs that I want to taste including a multi year vertical of 04/05/06 Ella Valley wines. I will probably be "meated" out for some time, aafter the massive coranary of meat we had over Passover. What about a nice Tunisian chicken Couscous with an accompaniment of cold salads (though spicy), and red sauce or natural sauce meatballs?

Thanks!
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Apr 21, 2009 1:10 pm

David, Hi......

Keeping in mind that a true Tunisian couscous can be fairly hot, I would suggest that in addition to the chicken you also add some chorizo sausages (believe it or not, if those are not on hand, Hormel's breakfast sausages can be a good substitute). And among the cold salads be sure to serve one or two that contain avocado or mango, both of which help rather nicely in keeping the palate refreshed.

As for me - altrhough I can live comfortably with fish and seafood couscous, I do not believe that chicken belongs in couscous, but who am I to push back the tide? In my not at all humble opinion, true North African couscous must contain mechoui (not the whole lamb but chunks with the crisp skin and fat intact). And, dear lord, whatever you do, don't forget the whole chickpeas.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby David Raccah » Tue Apr 21, 2009 2:00 pm

Awesome information and sorry if I am dragging this thread in the wrong direction. However, recently I have been enjoying squash and chicken or lamb Couscous with whole chickpeas and pureed squash - quite enjoyable! It makes for a nice thick soup and Couscous sauce. You can make it spicy with Harissa or with a nice amount of chili peppers, though my wife is impartial to them, so I make it weaker.

Thanks for all the info!
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Loweeel » Tue Apr 21, 2009 5:36 pm

I wouldn't be unhappy with CF as Israel's future.

I do hope/suspect that PS has about as much PromiSe though, especially with much less known about the grape (clone selection, rootstock) and no real old-world examples (Loire, Bordeaux for CF) or widely-varying regions (add Italy, Cali, Virginia, Lawn Guyland, Canadia, Great Lakes, Washington State for CF) from which to cull viticultural techniques and winemaking styles to emulate (or avoid).

Basically, PS is in chunks of Napa and Sonoma (and also Mendocino, Lodi, Amador, Calaveras, Santa Barbara, Contra Costa, Paso Robles), with Australia as the #2 locale, with a few plantings in Washington State, even fewer in Oregon, a few in El Valle de Guadalupe in Baja California (Mexico), and also Israel. It's basically extinct in its native France.

Rogov, do you know the acreage/tonnage of PS grown in Israel? I suspect that Israel may be #3 in PS cultivation after the US and Australia (possibly be #4 behind Mexico as well, and at worst would not be lower than #5 if there is more in the Isère and Ardêche regions of the Rhône Valley and in Palette in Provence than I suspect; I doubt that any cultivation in Niagara is more than experimental bottles and the same for Maipo and Colchagua in Chile). I could try to get Australia's numbers from CSIRO, but don't know about Mexico.
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Eli R » Tue Apr 21, 2009 6:10 pm

Daniel Rogov wrote:David, Hi...


I believe the above list is inclusive of all the wineries currently producing varietal Cabernet Franc wines that earned over 85 points. Tanya, you will notice, is listed; I do not believe Gush Etzion has released a varietal of this nature; and I did not include Zemora becuse for all practical purposes, that winery no longer exists.
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Rogov


Daniel, Hi,

Are you scheduled to taste the Na'aman 2007 vintage in the near future. I liked the 2007 CF and I am waiting to see your WTN. I expect it to be over 85 points.

Thanks,

Eli
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:19 pm

Eli, Hi....

Within the next two weeks.

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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Z Spigelman » Wed Apr 22, 2009 5:49 am

I have mixed feelings regarding this issue.
Having drank most of the kosher Cabernet Francs listed by Daniel, I divide them into 2 groups: the first group (Ella Valley, Gvaot, Recanati, Tanya) is a good bet for the future as "the" Israeli varietal wine, while the second group (Carmel, Psagot) is totally different (more of an oak influence, less fruity, medium-bodied) and I believe not very special.
I have not yet tasted the Tishbi (was not yet available the last time I visited the winery) or the Gush Etzion (since in my opinion it is way overpriced at NIS 150).
Concerning the Yatir 2006, Yaakov Ben Dor confirmed this morning that Yatir has never bottled a varietal Cabernet Franc.
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Menachem S » Wed Apr 22, 2009 1:09 pm

I see the potential, but frankly, don't love the varietal.

I love blends using it, but otherwise prefer (greatly) Cabs and Syrah/Shiraz, finding CF mostly an interesting oddity when I have had it.

I have had the gush etzion as well as the Ella Valley versions, it always has an "odd" taste profile to me.

Perhaps when I get a chance to taste what Eran Goldwasser does with it . . .
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby YoelA » Wed Apr 22, 2009 9:14 pm

So, couscous lovers. While in Israel reently I passed a kosher coucous place on Ibn Gvirol. Any comments on it?
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Daniel Rogov » Thu Apr 23, 2009 1:35 am

Yoel, Hi.....

The good news is that there are actually five different couscous restaurants/joints on Rehov Ibn Gvirol. The bad news is that none of them is very good.

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Rogov
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Daniel Rogov
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Re: Cabernet Franc: A Good Bet for Israel's Future?

Postby Mike_F » Thu Apr 23, 2009 9:10 am

Well, please forgive me but I prefer the Cabernet Franc to the couscous. Rogov, I'd like to set up a comparative tasting of a few of the best from your list for our wine club at work, and will much appreciate suggestions for a couple of overseas Cabernet Franc's that can be bought in Israel and used as a benchmark for the tasting.

many thanks,

Mike
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