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Venison

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Maria Samms

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Venison

by Maria Samms » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:51 pm

A friend of mine is going to give me some venison on Sunday. I absolutely love it, but I have never cooked it myself. It's almost impossible to get around here, unless you have a friend who hunts, which just seems soooo ridiculous with the amount of deer in our area (and they are pests!), but I digress.

Anyway, he is going to give me some cutlets and some stir fry and possibly some sausages. Any idea about what to do with the cutlets? can I make schnitzel or marsala like I could with veal? or is the meat too lean. Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks!
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Re: Venison

by GeoCWeyer » Fri Jun 04, 2010 5:31 pm

I give my venison a soak in a solution with a ratio of 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup kosher salt to 3 quarts water. Leave the meat in the solution for 2 hours. This will give you nice moist meat without really changing or masking the flavor. If the venison seems to be a bit bloody rinse it under cold water first and then add a 1/2 cup cider vinegar to the solution.

Depending on my hunting luck venison is our every day red meat throughout the year. It is also best medium rare!

We had a lovely fawn backstrap roasted medium rare Monday night.
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Re: Venison

by Daniel Rogov » Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:02 pm

As what may be amusing to some and perhaps revolting to others - quite a few years ago I had to write an article about a film (The Chef, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover) and as part of that I had to give some recipes and instructions for cooking human flesh. The thrust of the cookery was "much as you would prepare venison". Thus, with regard to the question of how to cook venison I can honestly reply: "Much as you would human flesh".

Apologies to any who get the creepy-crawlies from the above

Best
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Re: Venison

by GeoCWeyer » Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:41 pm

Cook it as you would/could lamb of the same cut, or if it is very light in color like you would veal.
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Alan Wolfe

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Re: Venison

by Alan Wolfe » Fri Jun 04, 2010 8:25 pm

Cut it into bite-sized pieces and give it to your dog, who will appreciate it, except perhaps not the sausages. Give them to a neighbor you don't like. :P
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Re: Venison

by Sue Courtney » Fri Jun 04, 2010 8:40 pm

I'm not sure what the cutlets are - do they have a bone in them?

I'm quite lucky where I live. We can buy farmed venison at the butcher.
The best part of the venison is the backstrap or fillet. They are very lean, very healthy and should not be cooked more than medium rare. You can treat it like you do lamb backstraps.
I quite like to put a seasoned herb and breadcrumb crust on one side of the fillet, drizzle it with olive oil and bake it (on a baking sheet) in a hot oven for 12 minutes or so, then leave to rest. It's quite nice served with a sauce made from cranberry jelly, orange zest and pinot noir, and when eaten accompanied with the rest of the Pinot Noir.
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Re: Venison

by Doug Surplus » Sat Jun 05, 2010 1:19 am

Daniel Rogov wrote:As what may be amusing to some and perhaps revolting to others - quite a few years ago I had to write an article about a film (The Chef, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover) and as part of that I had to give some recipes and instructions for cooking human flesh. The thrust of the cookery was "much as you would prepare venison". Thus, with regard to the question of how to cook venison I can honestly reply: "Much as you would human flesh".

Apologies to any who get the creepy-crawlies from the above

Best
Rogov


Would you serve this with some fava beans and a nice Chianti? :?
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Re: Venison

by Matilda L » Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:16 am

Alan says:
Cut it into bite-sized pieces and give it to your dog, who will appreciate it, except perhaps not the sausages. Give them to a neighbor you don't like.


Not keen on venison, Alan?
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Re: Venison

by Alan Wolfe » Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:21 am

Matilda - When we moved to the farm, we qualified as poor. There were lots of white-tailed deer and bullets are cheap. I made fresh sausages (Italian, pepper & sage, brats, chorizo), dry cured sausages (sopressata, pepperoni), brine cured ham (not bad at the time), dry cured ham (inedible, even the dog wouldn't eat it), fried, stewed, braised, on-the-grill, you name it. We ate waayyyy more venison that we wanted but it was all we had. We don't eat it anymore.
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Re: Venison

by Melissa Priestley » Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:57 pm

Doug Surplus wrote:Would you serve this with some fava beans and a nice Chianti? :?


I find it interesting that the Chianti reference is in the film version of the book, but the original quote in the book is "fava beans and a big Amarone." I'm guessing that they changed it because Chianti is much more recognizable to the masses than Amarone. However, it gets me thinking about the actual pairing - I wonder which would go better with human flesh, Chianti or Amarone?
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Re: Venison

by Mark Lipton » Wed Jun 09, 2010 4:15 pm

Maria,
If your venison comes from a hunter (as opposed to the farm-raised stuff that some stores will sell), it is leaner than any meat you're likely to have cooked. It is therefore vitally important that you preserve what moisture it has to prevent it from drying out too much and toughening. Do your cutlets have bone in them? Most hunters feel that the bone is the source of the "gamey" flavors that some object to (me, I love the gamey flavor) so I'd debone them if possible. Also, how does your family like their meat? If they eat meat well done, you've got a problem with venison as it will be the consistency of shoe leather by the time it's "done." The way I cook venison steaks is to give them a long marinate in a simple marinade of red wine, raspberry red wine vinegar, salt and black pepper. Then, I quickly pan fry them at high temperature to seal in the juices. I also reduce the marinade, stir in some lingonberry jam (not very sweet) and serve as a sauce over over the meat.

Another way to preserve the moisture is to lard the venison by wrapping it with bacon before cooking it. Venison to me is the ideal vehicle for a good Syrah. If you happen to have any older bottles of Verset's Cornas on hand, this is the meal to open one with :D

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Re: Venison

by Maria Samms » Wed Jun 09, 2010 6:57 pm

Mark - this is wild deer, not farm raised. What I ended up getting is some kielbasa, hot dogs, a small piece of loin (about 1 lb), and about a pound of "stew" he called it. No bones at all.

Chris and I eat our venison medium rare, and the guy said that loin was like "london broil", so I am assuming that I can marinate it and then give it a sear on all sides, slice thin and serve medium rare? For London Broil (a cut of beef usually from the top round, but I get a shoulder cut) I usually marinate for 24 hrs with a dry rub and sear it over hot coals for 5 min per side. Not sure if I should do the dry rub or do a wet one like you and Geo said. I will definitely serve it with a fruity sauce...since I like it like that :) . The stew, I am a litte more leary about. My MIL has eaten Venison stew several times but has never made it. She says, it's usually cooked in a red wine sauce. I haven't had it that way so am completely unsure about what to do? Stew or maybe a curry would be better since it's so lean and might get dry in a stew?

Thanks for the wine pairing ...that makes total sense and we are a big fan of Syrah. The bacon sounds like a fantastic idea as well!

I think I will just taste the hot dogs and sausage and see what I think.

Again any advice (uhhh...except that I should cook it like human flesh or feed it to a dog :roll: ) is appreciated!
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Re: Venison

by Mark Lipton » Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:31 pm

Maria Samms wrote:Mark - this is wild deer, not farm raised. What I ended up getting is some kielbasa, hot dogs, a small piece of loin (about 1 lb), and about a pound of "stew" he called it. No bones at all.

Chris and I eat our venison medium rare, and the guy said that loin was like "london broil", so I am assuming that I can marinate it and then give it a sear on all sides, slice thin and serve medium rare? For London Broil (a cut of beef usually from the top round, but I get a shoulder cut) I usually marinate for 24 hrs with a dry rub and sear it over hot coals for 5 min per side. Not sure if I should do the dry rub or do a wet one like you and Geo said. I will definitely serve it with a fruity sauce...since I like it like that :) . The stew, I am a litte more leary about. My MIL has eaten Venison stew several times but has never made it. She says, it's usually cooked in a red wine sauce. I haven't had it that way so am completely unsure about what to do? Stew or maybe a curry would be better since it's so lean and might get dry in a stew?


Now we're talkin', Maria! His "stew" is probably from the shoulder, which is tough and gristle-y. As with any stew meat, low, slow and wet is the rule. Curry's an interesting idea; I'd put it in a chili myself. Your ideas for the loin sound spot on. FWIW, the loin is the second most prized cut of venison, the "saddle" or "backstrap" being the choicest. Not everyone makes that distinction, though, so you might have the choicest cut in your "loin."

Thanks for the wine pairing ...that makes total sense and we are a big fan of Syrah. The bacon sounds like a fantastic idea as well!

I think I will just taste the hot dogs and sausage and see what I think.

Again any advice (uhhh...except that I should cook it like human flesh or feed it to a dog :roll: ) is appreciated!


Yeah, those sausages will depend so much on the seasonings used that there's no general rule. That "kielbasa" might make an interesting addition to a hearty dish like feijoada or cassoulet, or maybe just grill 'em and slap 'em on a bun. :D

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Re: Venison

by GeoCWeyer » Thu Jun 10, 2010 12:40 pm

Maria Samms wrote:Mark - this is wild deer, not farm raised. What I ended up getting is some kielbasa, hot dogs, a small piece of loin (about 1 lb), and about a pound of "stew" he called it. No bones at all.


One problem with the cured sausages like kielbasa is the tendency of "locker" or sausage maker to use a really heavy smoke. It is easy to OD quite quickly on that flavor. When you have a number of pounds of sausage made you usually freeze it. My son and I one year had 250 lbs of sausage made from the trimmings and scrap. Freezing seems to increase the density of the smoked flavor and decrease the flavors of the spices.
I love the life I live and live the life I love*, and as Mark Twain said, " Always do well it will gratify the few and astonish the rest".

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Re: Venison

by Daniel Rogov » Thu Jun 10, 2010 2:29 pm

Melissa Priestley wrote:... I wonder which would go better with human flesh, Chianti or Amarone?


Melissa, Hi.....

It would depend much on which part of the body one was eating. With small rib chops or cutlets a Chianti Classico Riserva or a Brunello di Montalcino; with leg of person or other large cuts, for sure an Amarone.

It is my understanding that Hannibal Lecter is now residing "somewhere in South America". Alas, his email address is not known to me so I cannot consult further with him on the issue.

Best
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Re: Venison

by Heinz Bobek » Fri Jun 11, 2010 6:46 am

Maria Samms wrote:Mark - this is wild deer, not farm raised. What I ended up getting is some kielbasa, hot dogs, a small piece of loin (about 1 lb), and about a pound of "stew" he called it. No bones at all.

Chris and I eat our venison medium rare, and the guy said that loin was like "london broil", so I am assuming that I can marinate it and then give it a sear on all sides, slice thin and serve medium rare? For London Broil (a cut of beef usually from the top round, but I get a shoulder cut) I usually marinate for 24 hrs with a dry rub and sear it over hot coals for 5 min per side. Not sure if I should do the dry rub or do a wet one like you and Geo said. I will definitely serve it with a fruity sauce...since I like it like that :) . The stew, I am a litte more leary about. My MIL has eaten Venison stew several times but has never made it. She says, it's usually cooked in a red wine sauce. I haven't had it that way so am completely unsure about what to do? Stew or maybe a curry would be better since it's so lean and might get dry in a stew?

Thanks for the wine pairing ...that makes total sense and we are a big fan of Syrah. The bacon sounds like a fantastic idea as well!

I think I will just taste the hot dogs and sausage and see what I think.

Again any advice (uhhh...except that I should cook it like human flesh or feed it to a dog :roll: ) is appreciated!



I like deer loin in Long Pepper crust on a spicy sauce with beets puree and cabbage role. Interested in the recipe?
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Re: Venison

by Maria Samms » Fri Jun 11, 2010 8:08 am

Yes Heinz! I would love the recipe...that looks fantastic!
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Re: Venison

by GeoCWeyer » Fri Jun 11, 2010 11:15 am

I like deer loin in Long Pepper crust on a spicy sauce with beets puree and cabbage role. Interested in the recipe?[/quote]

The backstrap looks beautiful! It look done to perfection! The only red meat that I prefer more is elk backstrap.
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Re: Venison

by Heinz Bobek » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:01 pm

Hello,
the game season started here already and because I made a venison dish yesterday I discovered that I didn't post the recipe of the deer in long pepper crust, as promised. I beg your pardon and post it herein after.

Deer loin in Long Pepper crust on a spicy sauce with beets puree and cabbage roulade.
(modified recipe created by Dieter Müller *** Germany)
Serves 4

Ingredients

For the meat
400 g deer loin
some walnut oil
For the pepper crust
4 tbsp Sesam seeds, black
1 tbsp Sesam seeds, white
1 tbsp Cilantro seeds
3 tbsp Mie de pain
1 tbsp long pepper, ground
1 tsp almonds, ground
1 tsp haselnuts, ground
For the Sauce:
200 ml dark deer- or venison stock,
1 tsp acacia honey
10 peppercorns
2 juniper berries
2 all spice corns
1 green cardamom capsule
1 star anis
50 ml red Portwine
20 g butter cubes, cold
For the red beets puree
80 g beetroot, cooked and peeled
80 g celery, peeled and diced
50 g butter cubes, cold
some lemon juice
Salt
For the cabbage roulades
1 white cabbage, small
2 slices bacon
1 shallot
2 tablespoons duck fat, with Greaves
2 tablespoons chives, finely sliced
salt
freshly ground pepper
50 ml chicken stock
1 tbsp butter

Preparation

1. For the pepper crust: grind the spices finely in a spice grinder and mix with the Mie de pain, the ground almonds and the ground hazelnuts.
2. Season the venison loin with salt and pepper, rub with walnut oil and roll it the pepper crust mixture back and forth so that the loin is evenly covered. Wrap tightly the loin into cling film and form a roll. Than wrap aluminum foil around. Turn around the ends of the foil to tighten. Poach the sealed loin for 10 minutes in a water bath at about 176 °F .
3. Remove the loin from the water bath and let rest in the oven at 140°F for a few minutes. Just before serving unwrap the loin and brown it in hot clarified butter by turning around.
4. For the sauce: crush the spices in a mortar and let caramelize slightly in heated honey. Deglace with port wine, add the deer stock and bring to the boil. Let simmer for 15 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve and bring to the boil again. Remove from heat and swivel in cold butter cubes.
5. For the beetroot puree: Cook the celery cubes in salted water with lemon juice until tender. Remove from the water and drain well in a sieve . Puree together with the beetroot, heat up and and mix in the butter cubes one at a time. When the puree becomes very smooth, season with salt to taste and keep warm.
6. For the stuffed cabbage roulades: Divide the cabbage head into leaves, remove the outer leaves and the tough stems. Blanch a couple of nice green leaves in boiling salted water, remove and rinse with cold water. Dry on paper towels. Cut the remaining leaves into thin strips.
7. Cut the streaky bacon into small pieces, chop finely the scallion and sauté together in duck fat. Add the cabbage strips and stew until tender, season with salt and pepper, let cool down a little and add the finely chopped chives. Lay out the dried leaves of cabbage, spread on each a bit of the cabbage filling and roll into small roulades. Heat up in chicken stock.
8. Form the warm beetroot puree with two spoons to a dumpling like shape and place it together with the warm stuffed cabbage roulade on the plate. Cut the venison loin into slices, add onto the plate and pour the sauce.

Preparation time 1 h 30 min
Last edited by Heinz Bobek on Tue Oct 23, 2012 7:59 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Venison

by Karen/NoCA » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:11 pm

Wow, that is a lenghty recipe and sounds delicious. Makes me wish I had some venison.
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Re: Venison

by Shaji M » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:48 pm

Heinz Bobek wrote:Hello,
the game season started here already and because I made a venison dish yesterday I discovered that I didn't post the recipe of the deer in long pepper crust, as promised.......


Yeah!!! Finally Heinz..I was waiting... :D The recipe sounds great though.
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Re: Venison

by Mike Filigenzi » Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:01 am

Love the sound of that sauce. A bit sweet, a bit spicy, but not fruity. How would it work with duck?
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Re: Venison

by Mark Lipton » Tue Oct 23, 2012 12:39 pm

Most interesting recipe, Heinz. Thanks for posting it.

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Re: Venison

by Jeff Grossman/NYC » Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:23 pm

Reads like a dream!
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