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Carl Eppig

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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Carl Eppig » Thu Oct 21, 2010 3:41 pm

Bob Parsons Alberta. wrote:Carl, the label is most eye-catching


Yup!
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Andrew Bair » Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:25 pm

Tim York wrote:
Anima Negra, Vino de la Tierra de Mallorca
Quibía 2008 (W) (€12), from Premsal 60%, Callet à jus blanc 40%), was attractively fleshy with attractive saltiness and mild bitterness towards the finish; 15/20+.


Tim -

Thank you for the note on this wine. Anyway, for whatever it is worth, I have a bottle of the Quibia, but don't see a vintage date on the bottle for some reason. Nearly all of my web searches show Quibia as a single-vintage wine, but I can't find a photo of a bottle that shows the vintage date... The retailer that I bought this bottle from said that it was the 2008 version, but I can't verify this from looking at an unopened bottle. Interesting...

Not sure that I'll get around to opening this particular wine in time for the October Wine Focus, as I don't have a food match lined up yet, but I will definitely open something Spanish in the next week or so and post on that.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:12 am

Ribeiro 2008 – Casal de Armán – Alc.13% (€13,50), made from Treixadura 90%, Godello 5% and Albariño 5%. This is another characterful white from North Western Spain made in the Galician appellation Ribeiro http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribeiro_%28DO%29. Aromas were of spicy ripe grapes, body was medium/light, with a round and fresh grapey fruitiness giving an initial impression of slight sweetness with floral fragrance, more exotic spices and lively acidity then kicking in leading to a briskly invigorating finish. It was a very unusual and good pairing for “moules mainières” (mussels). Another fascinating personal discovery in the wide palette of “other” Spain flavours; 16/20+ QPR!.

The estate’s website http://www.casaldearman.net/bodega/elvinedo.php, in Spanish only, reveals that this wine won a Decanter Gold medal (FWIW).
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Jenise » Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:48 am

Bob Parsons Alberta. wrote:Wow, some great notes there Tim. Montsant is repped here in AB, must take another looksie when in downtown area.
Those Cavas sound especially good! The Gramona website looks great but is only in Spanish.

http://www.gramona.com/web/index.html


I'll second that! I'm really missing out on participating this month--unfortunately, have only opened one bottle at home since the first of the month and unfortunately, that's not going to change until around the 1st.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Sun Oct 24, 2010 1:44 am

WTN: `07 Luna Beberide Mencia, Bierzo.

Bottle #2 as first bottle was returned to store.

$18 Cdn, 100% Mencia, good natural cork, no oak and unfiltered.

Color had big inky depth in center, purple on the rim. Rather earthy on the nose, dark black fruits but nothing distinct. Initial entry thought was very dry, good acidity and fair amount of tannin. I am still not convinced about this wine and think bottle variation `cos TNs on the net talk of "sweet cherry, raspberry, ripe" et al. Not this bottle chum! Tad too grapey for both of us, low on spice but did find some white pepper on day 2. I have to think better examples of Bierzo out there.
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WTN: José Pastor at Arlequin

by Keith M » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:09 am

You'll have to forgive me, as I included a Rioja, but hopefully some of the other wines aren't the 'usual suspects'.

After a bit of thrift shopping (and finding a pair of legendary shoes, yea!) and before heading to SoMa to join JC and some other friends for dinner, I stopped off on a Thursday evening to a tasting at Arlequin Wine Merchants featuring José Pastor of Vinos & Gourmet and his phenomenal selection of Spanish wines. In his trademark baseball cap (trademark to me, at least, as he's worn it both times I've met him) and with infectious energy and enthusiasm, he guided me and the other participants through a great group of wines. First up, the 2008 Benaza Monterrei Godello was from a DO I'm not so familiar with, right on the border with Portugal in Galicia. Ten percent of Doña Blanca is included with the Godello and the slightly tropical nose works nicely with the rich, wonderfully balanced, crisp and well-defined flavors in the mouth. Crisp and fun. The 2007 Bodegas Carballo La Palma Listán Blanco was from the La Palma island of the Canary Islands. Listán Blanco is evidently another name for the Palomino grape used in sherry and the wine was certainly reminiscent of some elements of sherry. Briney, salty on the nose, slightly more plush in the mouth, crispy. This wine is super fun and super geeky, couldn't walk away without a bottle. Some elements of oxidation which suggest some sherry qualities, but some richness and pureness that feels totally different. Want something different? There you go. Continuing with my first-ever introduction to the wines of the Canary Islands, the 2009 Bodegas Los Bermejos Lanzarote Diego Seco flipped over to the island of Lanzarote, on the African side of the Canaries and much more affected by tropical winds. Diego is evidently a native grape to the Canary Islands (which avoided the phylloxera disaster, evidently, and thus all have own rootstock). A crisp, fruity, almost smoky nose, plush, salty and fun in the mouth, feels kind of like a pinot grigio with richness and tang, yummy. The 2009 Bodegas Los Bermejos Lanzarote Malvasia Seco was from the same island, and had a neutral nose, rather like an attic (where do I come up with this stuff?). From older vines, I found it juicy spritzy and explosive in flavor at first, which quickly fades off toward the neutrality of the nose. Some good flavor but seems to fall flat. Back to slightly more familiar territory, insofar as I love to explore wines from the mencía grape, but the DO of the 2009 Germán Rodríguez Prada Valdeorras Mencía Galgueira is not so familiar to me as Bierzo and Ribeira Sacra. Small producer, only 120 cases come into the USA, high elevation, old vines, everything a growing boy needs. Plush, beautiful, rich and soft, raisiny deliciousness, fantastic. Sold. Wow, I love this grape. Back to the Canary Islands, the 2008 Bodegas Tajinaste Valle de la Orotava Listán Negro from the island of Tenerife was from the Listán Negro grape, which José seemed to indicate was the same as/related to the historic Mission grape here in California—which I couldn't collaborate with my existing sources—does anyone know? In any case, a darker spicebox nose, and tasting superspicy rich, full dark fruit, ripe but with good acidity, dark earthy roasted flavors, different and interesting. Reminds me of almonds, but didn't completely win me over for unknown reasons. The 2009 Laureano Serres Terra Alta Carbonica (from the region a bit southwest of Barcelona and comprising a blend of cariñena and cabernet sauvignon) had a greener nose that moved onto cinnamon, which was pretty cool. But the taste was rich, but less ripe, slight prickle on the palate, reminded me of a moscato without sugar, very grapey, juicy and playful, but not sold on this one. But unique, certainly—I'd try it again to see what I thought of it on another day. Finally the time to mosey on over to dinner had come so I got a pour of the oh-so-delicious 2003 Señorío de P. Peciña Rioja Crianza. Nose of carrot soup, great combination of flavors, integrated, tangy, and, what's that word I use so often? Fun! This is delicious and a buy! So I buy and head off to dinner. Not a bad day . . .
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:11 am

Martúe – DO Pago Campo de la Guardia

The wines of this estate, located at some 400 metres altitude near Toledo in torrid central Spain, were on show yesterday at a local wine merchant. The DO was unfamiliar to me and I learned that DO Pago signifies that the appellation is exclusive to this one estate.

My enthusiasm for a new personal discovery was tempered by the estate’s use of standard international grape varieties plus Tempranillo, which though Spanish is hardly a novelty. I am much more excited where an appellation new to me uses an unfamiliar local grape, like Mencia in Bierzo and Godello in Valdeorras. That said, the wines were good in a powerful style but hardly represented a striking new experience.

Chardonnay 2009 (€11) – not tasted.
Reds
Martúe 2007 (€11), from Tempranillo 50%, CabSauv, Syrah and Merlot, showed a nose of rich raspberry and wet leather and smooth full palate balanced by some nice crispness; 15.5/20.
Martúe Especial 2007 (€18), from CabSauv, Merlot and Syrah and matured in mainly new barrels 70% French and 30% American, showed a dark plum and leather strap nose and a powerful palate much more tannic and structured than the previous with some firm dark fruit and slight, by Spanish standards, notes of fine wood plank which should integrate quickly; 15.5/20++.
Syrah Martúe 2008 (€20), with similar “élevage” to the previous, was another powerhouse with round peppery red fruit and strong tannic backbone; 15.5/20 with some + potential with more time.
Last edited by Tim York on Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:27 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: WTN: José Pastor at Arlequin

by Tim York » Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:23 am

Keith M wrote:You'll have to forgive me, as I included a Rioja, but hopefully some of the other wines aren't the 'usual suspects'.

After a bit of thrift shopping (and finding a pair of legendary shoes, yea!) and before heading to SoMa to join JC and some other friends for dinner, I stopped off on a Thursday evening to a tasting at Arlequin Wine Merchants featuring José Pastor of Vinos & Gourmet and his phenomenal selection of Spanish wines.......


Fantastic notes, Keith :D .

I have become a sucker for the wines of NW Spain, especially Bierzo and Valdeorras, although I note from some people in this thread a degree of disappointment with individual bottles.

This is the first time I remember notes on wine from the Canaries. They sound well worth investigation but AFAIK none are available here.

Lastly, I too am a fan of Señorío de P. Peciña from Rioja for their elegant classically styled wines. We have an importer here and I hope that his sales are measuring up to the wines' quality.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:16 am

That is quite a selection at Arlequin Wine Merchants. Sounds like the owner knows how to find the unusual suspects! We would all go broke shopping there.
I see there is a website, needless to say I checked on Portugal! Some Pato which is great plus a load of ports. The selection from Spain is quite overpowering.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:41 pm

Valderroa Mencia - DO Valdeorras 2008 - Bodegas Valdesil - Alc.13.5% (€8,50). This Mencia derived Galician wine comes from Valdeorras, more famous for Godello. It is a very attractive and moreish medium bodied red with burgeoning savoury fruit showing an ivy tinge, lively acidity and some attractive bitterness on the finish. Perhaps more simplistic and less polished than some of the offerings from Bierzo but none the worse for that, particularly at this price point. I can see its having similar gastronomic use to Beaujolais, Dolcetto or Touraine Gamay. The more Mencia I drink the less I see the similarity, claimed by some, with Cabernet franc. I'll get some more of this; 15.5/20++ QPR!
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:10 pm

Bob Parsons Alberta. wrote:That is quite a selection at Arlequin Wine Merchants. Sounds like the owner knows how to find the unusual suspects! We would all go broke shopping there.
I see there is a website, needless to say I checked on Portugal! Some Pato which is great plus a load of ports. The selection from Spain is quite overpowering.


I don't seem to be able to load the Arlequin site. I tried several times. Good thing perhaps; I might dehydrate from salivating.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Andrew Bair » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:50 pm

NV Bodegas La Cigarrera (María de Pilar García de Velasco) Manzanilla de Sanlúcar de Barrameda
From 375 ml bottle; bottled on 03/2010. Pleasantly oxidative nose of almonds, tangerines, and fresh flowers. Light in weight, fresh, bone dry, and nicely balanced, with saline, nutty, woody, and lightly citrus notes. Very good.
This is a new bodega to me, one of a few in the De Maison Selections portfolio. Anyway, I like all varieties of Sherry, but haven't explored it that much, since many people that I know only buy it to cook with. Otherwise, I would definitely Sherry more than 4-5 times a year.


Anyway, Keith, I enjoyed your notes on the Canary Islands wines. Can't say that I have ever seen anything from the Canaries before, but it seems like Canary wines were well-known in Shakespeare's time already.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Joe Moryl » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:33 pm

2009 Verdejo Old Vines, Shaya, Rueda: Very pale and fresh looking. Shy but elegant nose. On the palate there are dried orange peel/grapefruit notes with a shot of white pepper. Very crisp and fresh with decent length. Some depth but nothing too profound. Some Rueda Verdejos come off as Sauvignon Blanc wannabes, but this is clearly something else. At $12, very good value for money. Wonder what this tastes like with some age? 13.5% abv, but not really showing it.

IIRC, the shelftalker in the shop clamed these were 75-100 year old vines, so we are dealing with truly old vine stuff here.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Sun Oct 31, 2010 4:57 pm

Before this thread leaves the front page, let me remind you all of an apparently remarkable estate of which I got a tantalising glimpse at a big sip and spit tasting last year.

Avanthia, Valdeorras, Spain
I intended to avoid the Spanish heavy hitters but, when I said to Heinz Velich, only half jokingly, that I should go home after his table
(which included Nigl) because everything else would be an anti-climax, he insisted that I should try these. He was right.
Valdeorras Godello 2008 (€29) was the best, but also the dearest, Godello I have yet seen and some of the others were very good; aromas were of fleshy white fruit and minerals and there was ripeness and fine lively acidity on the medium/full palate; 17/20.
Valdeorras Mencia 2008 (€82!!) saw 18 months in new oak but was remarkable for the purity of its aromas and fruit, with notes of red currant and cherry, and its roundness, length, elegance and acid balance; it is rare to see a red showing so beautifully with its oak well integrated so soon after bottling; 17.5/20 with ++ potential.


This is only a provisional impression because I like to drink a wine at dinner before forming a firmer opinion. Furthermore it is quite likely that the Mencia here has gone into an aromatically closed period since last year with the wood more exposed. Given the prices, particularly for the red, it is unlikely that I will investigate these on the home turf.

As a final thought, I wonder if Spanish producers are going to be able to sustain stratospheric prices for top cuvées. I guess that the core demand for Avanthia, top Bierzos from Palacios and Perez and the like is domestic. Given the parlous state of the Spanish economy, I wonder whether their rich will still want to pay these prices.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Carl Eppig » Mon Nov 01, 2010 8:33 pm

2008 Bodegas Vinos Le Leon, Tinto Lena (1 ltr $9.49 Whole Foods); 50% Temprillio, and 50% Garnacha; and 12.5% alcohol. Yuk!!!! :oops:
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Bruce K » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:03 am

Benaza 2008 Monterrei Mencia, $14
My first wine from Monterrei, which I believe is in Galicia. This was delightful, with clear bright cherry fruit accented by herbal, mineral and light earth aromas and flavors. Well-balanced with refreshing acidity, it just sings. Clearly made for food, it's an excellent match with takeout mariscos saltado. Four nights later, it's every bit as good if not better. Again, it has beautiful bright zingy fruit with herbal, mineral and earth complexity and went great with a sweet potato/chick pea soup.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:37 am

Bruce, I too liked a Monterrei I had in November last year. Mine sounds even more unconventional in flavour than yours. Here is my TN -

I tried Monterrei “Alanda” 2006 Quinta da Muradella (Galicia), from Mencia, Bastardo and Arauxa, at a recent tasting and was attracted by what I then described as “its unusual flavours of steely and tangy cherry with a lively medicinal hint”. On retasting at home I don’t think that “medicinal” is an adequate descriptor and now analyse it as a hint of brandy with a bitter liquorice tinge; combined with the steely and tangy cherry, lively acidity and decent structure, this is surprisingly attractive and went almost as well as Chianti was a pasta dish with parmesan gratings and tomato sauce. The importer says that this wine is non-commercial; what a pity; 15.5/20++.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Bruce K » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:44 am

Tim York wrote:Bruce, I too liked a Monterrei I had in November last year. Mine sounds even more unconventional in flavour than yours.


The wine you had sounds fascinating. Maybe the blend of grapes had something to do with it. I wouldn't describe the Benaza, which is labeled as Mencia, as unconventional -- just delicious. And better, to my taste, than most Mencias I've had from Bierzo. I'd say it's more along the lines of Mencias I've had from Ribeira Sacra, albeit with less funk (at least than Ventura).
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Victor de la Serna » Sun Nov 07, 2010 11:50 am

Quinta da Muradella's consulting winemaker is the ubiquitous Raúl Pérez - also in Ribeira Sacra (Guímaro, El Pecado). But his best wine remains the sensationally complex, mineral and subtle Ultreia de Valtuille made in his own Bierzo winery.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Sue Courtney » Tue Nov 09, 2010 4:06 pm

Telmo Rodriguez Gaba do Xil Godello 2009
Pale in colour with a delicate sweet nutty aroma with hints of honeysuckle coming through. Smooth and moderately full in the palate with a nutty creamy richness, hints of apricot, alcohol warmth and underlying citrus, there are nuances in the wine that make you think a) Chardonnay, or b) Viognier, but it's something completely different, utterly fascinating and extremely tasty. 13.5% alc. Cork closure. NZ$22.

From the Valdeorras DOC in the Galicia area of north west Spain, this is named for the river Xil (ancient name of the river Sil that runs through the region) and the attractive label displays a dozen bridges.

Telmo Rodriquez is one of the founders of this label. He has a mission to bring forgotten grape varieties back into fashion, however, from all accounts, Godello is the same grape variety as Verdehlo.

This version is richer and rounder than any of the Sauv Blanc-like Australian and apple-like New Zealand Verdelhos that I have tried.

Cheers,
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Andrew Bair » Tue Nov 23, 2010 12:15 am

Andrew Bair wrote:
Tim York wrote:
Anima Negra, Vino de la Tierra de Mallorca
Quibía 2008 (W) (€12), from Premsal 60%, Callet à jus blanc 40%), was attractively fleshy with attractive saltiness and mild bitterness towards the finish; 15/20+.


Tim -

Thank you for the note on this wine. Anyway, for whatever it is worth, I have a bottle of the Quibia, but don't see a vintage date on the bottle for some reason. Nearly all of my web searches show Quibia as a single-vintage wine, but I can't find a photo of a bottle that shows the vintage date... The retailer that I bought this bottle from said that it was the 2008 version, but I can't verify this from looking at an unopened bottle. Interesting...

Not sure that I'll get around to opening this particular wine in time for the October Wine Focus, as I don't have a food match lined up yet, but I will definitely open something Spanish in the next week or so and post on that.



Late for the October Wine Focus, of course - but I just opened this yesterday, and solved my question in the process. The vintage year (2008) is on the cork, which of course was obscured by the capsule.

As far as a note...

2008 Anima Negra Quíbia Vi de la Terra de Mallorca
60% Prensal (also known as Moll)/40% Callet. The vintage is only shown on the end of the cork, so the bottle appears to be of a nonvintage wine until the capsule is removed.
Full-bodied, bone dry, oily, and balanced, rather peachy on the nose, with tropical fruit, apricot, and pear flavors. Good/very good, especially with a meatier fish.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Tim York » Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:26 pm

I took the opportunity of yesterday’s tasting to sample a few products from vast range of the Oro-wines group. I believe that Jorge Ordoñez is a partner in this enterprise, so the wines should be available in the USA. I particularly chose wines from Spain’s North-West, the lively and original flavours of which continue to enchant me where oak treatment is discreet. Prices are full at this importer and, with the reds, where a bodega was offering more than one wine I usually preferred the more modest. In particular I found the up-market Montsant and Garnachas rather fatiguing.

Shaya – Rueda – both below 100% Verdejo
Rueda Old Vines 2008 (€12) showed a Sauvignon type nose not entirely free of feline water but the palate was medium bodied, ample, generous yet crisp with lovely green fruit including some gooseberry; 15.5/20+.
Rueda Habis 2008 (€36), oak aged for 6 months, was more suave, richer and longer that the previous but with a crispness which gave excellent balance; 16.5/20.

Val de Parariñas – Bierzo
Bierzo Capricho 2009 (W) (€15), made from Godello 85% and Doña Blanca 15%, showed similar amplitude and roundness to the Godello which I have met from Valdeorras coupled with a much livelier acidity and more marked gravelly minerality; the presenter says that this is contribution ofr the Bierzo terroir; 16/20.
Bierzo Herencia del Capricho 2007 (W) (€36), made from Godello 75% and Doña Blanca 25% with 12 months oak ageing, has not yet fully integrated its oak aromas but shows a more suave texture and greater roundness allied to similar lively acidity and minerality; potentially 16/20++ which the wood is absorbed.

Avanthia – Valdeorras
Valdeorras Godello 2009 (W) (€29) showed a nose of creamy white fruit and a touch of cedar and a medium/full bodied medium dry palate with creamy roundness and some RS offset by juicy mouth-watering acidity and discreet minerality; 16.5/20++.
Valdeorras Mencia 2008 (R) (€82) was made from old vines and matured for 18 months in new oak barrels. I raved about this wine last year and now confirm my enthusiasm. It was remarkable for the purity of its aromas and fruit, with notes of red currant and cherry, and its roundness, length, elegance and acid balance; I could detect no overt new oak flavours. There is no more than 10 years track record of ageing for these North Western Mencias; it is delicious now and I can only guess that it seems to have the balance and constituents to permit a long life; 17.5/20 now.

Xestal & Ucedo – Bierzo – both 100% Mencia
Bierzo Xestal 2006 (€19) showed lovely aromas of cherry, ivy and wet leather and quite dense and tangy palate with inoffensive residues of oak ageing (50% new); 16/20+.
Bierzo Ucedo 2005 (€36), aged 100% in new wood, showed darker cherry aromas, more mineral touches, depth, creaminess and structure as well as a faint yet polished wood patina which fortunately did obscure the Bierzo character; this will probably fully integrate. Meanwhile 16/20+.

Bodega Atteca – Catalayud – both from Garnacha
Catalayud Garnacha 2009 (€16) showed some medium/full body, very nice sweet dark plum fruit sprinkled with pepper and decent backbone. Straightforward and well balanced and I liked it; 16/20
Catalayud Anas 2006 (€49), from old vines, was much more concentrated and structure but the fruit was confected (English boiled sweet) and veering towards the jammy while malty liquorice notes were quite marked. Some may love this but it is not really my thing; maybe it would benefit from more time; 15/20 now.

Alto Moncayo, Campo de Borja – Garnacha
Campo de Borja Aquilon 2008 (€140) was dense, powerful, smooth, rich and also quite confected and malty. In the pretentiously priced Garnacha/Grenache stakes, I think that Hervé Bizeul in Roussillon does a much better job with his Petite Sibérie. More time needed here? 15/20 now.

Can Blau, Montsant
Montsant Can Blau 2008 (€21), from Mazuela (=Carignan) and Syrah both 40% and Garacha 20%, showed some pure plum-like fruit medium weight and a certain tangy elegance; 16/20++.
Montsant Mas de Can Blau (€53), from Mazuela and Syrah both 35% and Garnacha 30%, was somewhat closed aromatically but showed much more depth of suave sweet fruit and of body and structure and the polishe oak patina was still very marked; 15.5/20 now but +++ if the oak integrates properly.
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Mon Nov 29, 2010 3:14 pm

Wow, nice post there Tim. Recent discussions about Garnacha and Calatayud elsewhere had me looking around the shelves downtown recently so hopefully I can continue to contribute here when palate is in better shape!
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Re: Wine Focus October: Spain outside the usual suspects

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:00 pm

Joe Moryl wrote:2009 Verdejo Old Vines, Shaya, Rueda: Very pale and fresh looking. Shy but elegant nose. On the palate there are dried orange peel/grapefruit notes with a shot of white pepper. Very crisp and fresh with decent length. Some depth but nothing too profound. Some Rueda Verdejos come off as Sauvignon Blanc wannabes, but this is clearly something else. At $12, very good value for money. Wonder what this tastes like with some age? 13.5% abv, but not really showing it.

IIRC, the shelftalker in the shop clamed these were 75-100 year old vines, so we are dealing with truly old vine stuff here.


Joe, I have been digging in the archives again mostly `cos I remember our Verdejo discussion.
Just picked up, on a whim, a new offering from PradoRey, it is a Verdejo/Viura blend....B18 Birlocho, the 2009 vintage. Very much entry-level, fennel citrus nose, lime, apple ripe pear on the palate. Crisp refreshing, just what one needs on a warm summer evening!
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