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Mincemeat Pie???

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Howie Hart

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Mincemeat Pie???

by Howie Hart » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:16 am

My mother used to make mincemeat pies for Thanksgiving every year. But, about 15 years ago, she started buying them from a local bakery. It's a very good bakery and the pies are good, but her pies were better. I'm not sure how she made them. While Googling about mincemeat, there are recipes that require preparing the mixture 1 week to 1 month ahead of time. Since Thanksgiving will be here in a few weeks, I figure if I'm going to try my stab at it, I'd better get moving. There are also reference to "Cross and Blackwell", which, I believe, is an English brand. I'm pretty sure my mother used some sort of mixture she bought at the store and added it to raisins, apples, etc. Can anybody give me a little guidance here?
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Robin Garr

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Re: Mincemeat Pie???

by Robin Garr » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:33 am

Howie, Crosse & Blackwell is a British firm that puts up all sorts of condiments. I'm guessing your mom probably used some kind of fruit chutney. Here are a few options on Amazon.com.
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Re: Mincemeat Pie???

by Howie Hart » Tue Nov 07, 2006 12:07 pm

Well, I just did a search and found:
Crosse & Blackwell Mincemeat, Rum & Brandy, 29 oz. jar
However, I don't think this is what my Mom used. If I recall correctly, it was a dried product, packed in a sealed box.
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Bob Parsons Alberta

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Re: Mincemeat Pie???

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Tue Nov 07, 2006 1:25 pm

Howie Hart wrote:Well, I just did a search and found:
Crosse & Blackwell Mincemeat, Rum & Brandy, 29 oz. jar
However, I don't think this is what my Mom used. If I recall correctly, it was a dried product, packed in a sealed box.


Yup, I remember the best one being packaged like that. Like dates, vacuum sealed etc. However I think there are some pretty good tins of mince meat out there..but where?!!! You should have contacted Fortnum and Mason in London, they ship out anywhere.

******www.fortnumandmason-usa.com, that will do the trick!!!!!

However, the Crosse and Blackwell is a very good product.
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David Creighton

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Re: Mincemeat Pie???

by David Creighton » Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:18 pm

my mother, too, used to make mince pie - as it was called. she bought the jar kind and added more fresh apples.

later i started making my own. 'real' mince meat actually contains MEAT! it is a very ancient recipe. yes, it is better if you keep it longer after you make it; but don't let that stop you. the important thing is to add plenty of alcohol - brandy, rum, madeira - or some combination. i use freshly ground spices as well. the meats can be almost anything. recipes usually call for beef; but it could be venison, duck or other. if you use organ meats - called humbles in england - then you get 'humble pie'. the usual recipes call for 2 to 1 suet to beef; but i reverse these. it also calls for raisons; but i also use other dried fruit including cherries. fresh apples of course - and grind the meats coursly. cook everything long enough to blend the flavors and when it cools, add the alcohol and close it up. probably refrigerate it; but the point was in the past, refrigeration was not available and the alcohol sufficed. have fun! and serve plenty of malmsy with it!
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Paul Winalski

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Re: Mincemeat Pie???

by Paul Winalski » Tue Nov 07, 2006 10:38 pm

Howie Hart wrote:My mother used to make mincemeat pies for Thanksgiving every year. But, about 15 years ago, she started buying them from a local bakery. It's a very good bakery and the pies are good, but her pies were better. I'm not sure how she made them. While Googling about mincemeat, there are recipes that require preparing the mixture 1 week to 1 month ahead of time.


Only one month?? One of my British friends makes up her mincemeat a year in advance of when she intends on using it. A lot of brandy and rum is involved--this stuff must be kept away from open flame. :D

There are also reference to "Cross and Blackwell", which, I believe, is an English brand.


Yes, Cross and Blackwell are makers of various condiments, including a prepared mincemeat.

-Paul W.
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Peter May

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humble

by Peter May » Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:01 am

creightond wrote: if you use organ meats - called humbles in england - then you get 'humble pie'.


umbles (no h) is an archaic word, the English word for organ meat is 'offal'.

Mincemeat in Britain, used primarily in mincepies eaten at Christmas does contain meat, but only in the form of suet.

We've made mincemeat in the past and the homemade stuff is even better that the store bought jars. And it is an excuse to douse in brandy. It should be made in advance as the flavours meld and mature. It lasts forever -- or would do if not so tasty.

Mincepies are usually individual pies about the diameter of a US muffin, made of shortcrust pastry (sometime puff) and served with Christmas pudding on the day it self, and offered to carol singers that call at the door alongside a glass of Port or Sherry. We like a mincepie and coffee in the afternoon after we've had a brisk winters walk.
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Re: humble

by Paul B. » Thu Nov 09, 2006 12:25 pm

Peter May wrote:umbles (no h) is an archaic word, the English word for organ meat is 'offal'.

Now, that wouldn't happen to be a pun, would it? Offal ... "awful"? :lol:

Of course I don't partake in that opinion myself, believing that all edible things should be put to good and wholesome use.
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