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wnissen

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How do you cook while your partner's away?

by wnissen » Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:37 am

I don't know about you, but I have trouble getting up the motivation to cook when it's just me in the house. So even though I'm the cook in the family, I never really bothered to make real meals when my wife was out of town. Now that my son is old enough to eat dinner with me, though, I find myself cooking even when my wife is not around. How about you?
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Jeff Grossman/NYC

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Jeff Grossman/NYC » Wed Jun 06, 2012 1:59 am

When I'm stag I will usually forego making stews and other long-cooked meals. I tend towards food that takes a fast trip through a saute pan or the broiler.
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Matilda L

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Matilda L » Wed Jun 06, 2012 2:17 am

Right now, the Francophile is in England, on family business. I've had the house to myself for the last two and a half weeks. How do I cook while my partner's away? Badly. Seldom. I've been grilling bacon, eating small cans of tuna (in the correct fashion, tin in one hand and fork in the other, standing at the sink), and snacking on cold chicken from the fridge. Monday night, I excelled myself and made roast rack of lamb with brussels sprouts. Tuesday, I grazed on the left over cold lamb. Today, the Indian take-away down the road is looking good for dinner...

Disgraceful, I know. He'll be back next week and I'm actually looking forward to having a reason to cook interesting well balanced meals again.
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Fred Sipe

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Fred Sipe » Wed Jun 06, 2012 8:19 am

I sear some scallops, pan grill some lamb chops, make some oyster stew or cook myself other things she's not fond of!
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Mike Filigenzi

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Mike Filigenzi » Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:21 pm

It's all over the place for me. My daughter is out of school for the summer and at an age where she may or may not be home for dinner and if she is, she may or may not be hungry. (I came home from work at 6:00 a couple of evenings ago to find her sitting in the family room with a huge bowl of cereal which pretty much ended up being her supper.) That uncertainty will sometimes lead me to going strictly with leftovers or takeout. I can only do that for a couple of days before I have to cook something decent, even if it's just for myself.
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wnissen

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by wnissen » Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:34 pm

I will admit that when it was just me in the house, I certainly would have hot dogs or takeout chinese (Panda Express is actually pretty good compared to many sit down Chinese restuarants). Someone I knew would have just mashed potatoes and barbecue sauce as dinner, talk about a one-dish meal.
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Carrie L.

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Carrie L. » Wed Jun 06, 2012 1:01 pm

wnissen wrote:(Panda Express is actually pretty good compared to many sit down Chinese restuarants).


Agree with you about Panda Express. I like it a lot.

I also run the gambit when Len is away. Sometimes I'll make something that he typically doesn't share my tastes for, such as braised oxtail, or something like Pad Thai.

Othertimes, I will be happy just eating leftovers, or a burger patty or some Tyson's chicken wings from the freezer....or Panda Express takeout!
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Carl Eppig

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Carl Eppig » Wed Jun 06, 2012 1:12 pm

Cook simple fare or eat out.
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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Rahsaan » Wed Jun 06, 2012 2:26 pm

I thought this was going to be about all the different styles and indulgences we can use when alone. One of mine is to use more spicy chili sauce, which my wife doesn't really like.
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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Karen/NoCA » Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:27 pm

When Gene is away from the house, which is rare, but a welcome respite for me, I still cook for myself. If it is summer and I have a lot of tomatoes, I will usually make a big salad with some canned albacore or smoked salmon. Sometimes I make a pizza with Indian naan bread and pile it up with goodies from the garden. I have also grilled a steak, and baked a potato.
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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Jenise » Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:34 pm

When I'm alone? Leftovers or one dish meals. So maybe I make a salad. If that doesn't end up feeling like enough, I might follow with a bowl of peas. But I'll eat one easy-fast thing at a time.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Carrie L.

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Carrie L. » Wed Jun 06, 2012 9:31 pm

Matilda L wrote: How do I cook while my partner's away? Badly. Seldom. I've been grilling bacon, eating small cans of tuna (in the correct fashion, tin in one hand and fork in the other, standing at the sink),


This made me laugh Matilda. :)
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
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Bob Sisak

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Bob Sisak » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:21 pm

My wife absolutely will not eat any seafood, nor does she like any spicy foods. So, I cook spicy seafood dishes for myself when she's not here. She's on a road trip until Sunday, and I've been in heaven! Last night I made a dish from a recipe I got in Singapore. It's shrimp, serrano chilles, garlic and soy sauce. That's it! Stir fried and served over Hinoki rice. Yum! Takes only as long to prep and cook as the rice takes to cook. Simple, quick - and deliciously hot.
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Carrie L.

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Carrie L. » Sat Jun 09, 2012 8:10 am

Bob Sisak wrote:My wife absolutely will not eat any seafood, nor does she like any spicy foods. So, I cook spicy seafood dishes for myself when she's not here. She's on a road trip until Sunday, and I've been in heaven! Last night I made a dish from a recipe I got in Singapore. It's shrimp, serrano chilles, garlic and soy sauce. That's it! Stir fried and served over Hinoki rice. Yum! Takes only as long to prep and cook as the rice takes to cook. Simple, quick - and deliciously hot.


Wow Bob. That does sound good!
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
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Karen/NoCA

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Karen/NoCA » Sat Jun 09, 2012 4:24 pm

What is Hinoki rice?
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Jo Ann Henderson

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Jo Ann Henderson » Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:22 pm

Karen/NoCA wrote:What is Hinoki rice?

It's a type of Asian rice (Japanese, I think) that is a bit sticky. Love it!

When I am in the house alone, which is not often, I cook the type of food I like to eat -- usually spicier and different types of recipes that my family doesn't particularly enjoy. Usually seafood dishes like ginger crab or gilled fish with Mediterranean flare (tarragon or fennel with lemons and black olives or capers), especially many more vegetables and combinations, inspired by Indian or Szechuan cooking. Then I will make myself a dessert that is not a family favoriet, flan or cheesecake. I take any leftovers to work to share if I'm making a family size dish. But, I've been trying my hand at cooking in smaller quantities. Judith Jones' cookbook, The Pleasures of Cooking for One, has come in handy in determining how to scale back some recipes.
"...To undersalt deliberately in the name of dietary chic is to omit from the music of cookery the indispensable bass line over which all tastes and smells form their harmonies." -- Robert Farrar Capon
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Bob Sisak

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Bob Sisak » Sun Jun 10, 2012 4:30 pm

Oops! I forgot one very important ingredient - minced ginger. Chiles, garlic and ginger are classic flavorings/aromatics in Singapore.

Hinoki is a medium grain rice, a bit sticky and the brand I get comes from California.

Last night's dinner was a potato crusted salmon filet over garlic mashed potatoes. The filet is spread with a cream cheese/lemon juice blend (I've also used mayo in place of the cream cheese), covered both sides with the shredded potato mixture (potatoes, salt, pepper, flour, granulated garlic and egg), then sauteed until the potatoes are brown and crusty. Plated by laying down a bed of the garlic mashed with the salmon on top. Paired with a 2008 Loring Russian River Valley PN.
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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Mark Lipton » Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:31 am

I tend to cook simply when Jean (or, more relevantly, Jean and Andy) is out of town. I'll make burritos or pasta with pesto or a salad or these days assemble a sandwich from a baguette and various cheeses/charcuterie drawn from the fridge. If it's myself and Andy I'll often make a meal for the two of us which tends to be more meat-intensive.

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David M. Bueker

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by David M. Bueker » Tue Jun 12, 2012 8:04 am

Two options:

1. Grill fish (Laura does not like fish)
2. Call Salil & have him cook! :wink: :mrgreen:
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Robert Reynolds

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by Robert Reynolds » Tue Jun 12, 2012 7:03 pm

Bbq takeout, fried egg and cheese sandwich, sometimes pbj, always quick and easy.
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GeoCWeyer

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Re: How do you cook while your partner's away?

by GeoCWeyer » Sat Jun 16, 2012 6:15 am

When my wife isn't home for a meal I many times will cook something that only I enjoy. When she is home I always cook things she will enjoy.
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