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John F

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New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by John F » Sat Nov 03, 2012 7:19 am

So.....after having spent the last 8 years living overseas (and 11 of the last15) it looks like I will be returning to the US in the next 3-6 months. As part of the return,we have totally gutted and renovated our kitchen in the house we maintained in Connecticut. That project should be complete right around Christmas. Many of you have been through these renovations and they are both fun and frustrating, but our's had the added twist of having to do project management from New Delhi and manage most of the process through pics, video and many phone calls.

So here is where you all come in! We will have a brand new kitchen in a structural sense, but we need to "outfit" it in terms of most everything else. Over the years we have dragged many kitchen items around the world with us, others have drifted off to our beach house, and still others have been siphoned off by our kids setting up their first apartments. We have a few "keeper" items with us still, but in general we have not invested much in these things over time.

What are some of the things you absolutely love in your kitchens? Things you go to day in and day out - or things you only use on occasion but always delight you. I'm talking everything here.....good knives, cutting boards, plastic bowls, Le Crueset, fabulous pots and pans, salad spinners, pasta drainers, pepper grinders, spice racks, cutlery, glasses (wine and otherwise). You can mention big ticket items or even the little things that delight you...a great corkscrew, a garlic press, a micro planer, a favourite spatula.....obviously when you think about how much "stuff" you really accumulate in your kitchen over time this list could go on and on. A food processor, Kitchen Aid, blenders, rice machines, woks.....stop me, I'm out of control!!!

Anyway - you guys get the sense. As I have deferred investing in this category for a long time, for practical purposes this exercise is a "money is no object" process. Thought it might be a bit of fun for all of you kitchen/cooking fanatics - and I'm sure it will be immensely helpful to me.

Thanks in advance for any ideas you have - and hope you have fun as well!
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Jeff Grossman/NYC

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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jeff Grossman/NYC » Sat Nov 03, 2012 2:34 pm

Love my Le Creuset dutch oven!
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Christina Georgina » Sat Nov 03, 2012 4:19 pm

1.deBuyer mineral pans. All 3 sizes and saute pan. Pros: lifetime nonstick without the industrial coatings; wonderful heat distribution for best searing; very easy cleaning and for me , they work on induction. Cons: heavy ; need to maintain the seasoning until used many times;can't let food sit in them for long periods; can't be used to braise acidic items i.e. they are considered "reactive"
2. a large section of counter top that is end grain wood for cutting.
3. I wouldn't make pasta nearly as often without my Kitchen Aid pasta attachment. It's basically the Atlas parts that fit into the KA motor. This has expanded my pasta repetoire immensely
4. the new Penzey's peppermill that is big enough to handle their Extra Bold Peppercorns
Mamma Mia !
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jeff Grossman/NYC » Sat Nov 03, 2012 6:43 pm

Christina Georgina wrote:4. the new Penzey's peppermill that is big enough to handle their Extra Bold Peppercorns

What is this? I am having trouble right now with a new Peugeot mill -- a respected brand -- but it does say something about a size limit. Are you trying to tell me something?
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Christina Georgina » Sun Nov 04, 2012 1:26 am

Penzeys has redesigned their pepper mill so that it accepts all sizes of peppercorns. I love their Extra Bold peppercorns but they are huge and I always ended up using a spice grinder which was a pain to drag out of the cabinet so I quit buying them until now.
Mamma Mia !
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jo Ann Henderson » Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:02 am

A good (but not perfect) set of pots I bought was in 1984 when I got a set of Belgique stainless steel cookware. I believe I got 8 pieces for about $250, which was a good deal of money for me at the time. To this day they are my go-to pots for everything. They never stick, they heat evenly, and most people can't believe I've had these pots longer than 5 years, as they clean up beautifully. Not certain you would get the same quality today if purchasing these same pans.

Over the years I have added other specialty pans, and if I were outfitting my kitchen again with cookware, I would definitely have the entire line of Emile Henry's Flame cookware. I have 4 pieces, and they are versatile, beautiful, and a marvel of modern cooking. I love and use frequently each piece.

My next beloved piece of equipment is my Kitchen Aid Deluxe Edition stand mixer, with meat grinder attachment. I added a year or so later the paddle blade called the side swiper, which I can't praise enough! I like to make cookies (almost weekly) and my favorite cookie scoops are made my Hamilton Beach which makes commercial grade food scoops. I've bought and used others, but these are fantastic! I have 3 sizes -- crabcake, ice cream, cookies.

I'll add more as I think of them. My kitchen appliances and supplies are such a part of me, it's hard to step back and think about the pieces individually. But, as it hits me, I'll add to the list. Good luck.

Boy, woudl I love to have this experience with you!!! :oops: :mrgreen:
"...To undersalt deliberately in the name of dietary chic is to omit from the music of cookery the indispensable bass line over which all tastes and smells form their harmonies." -- Robert Farrar Capon
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jenise » Sun Nov 04, 2012 2:38 pm

Jeff Grossman/NYC wrote:
Christina Georgina wrote:4. the new Penzey's peppermill that is big enough to handle their Extra Bold Peppercorns

What is this? I am having trouble right now with a new Peugeot mill -- a respected brand -- but it does say something about a size limit. Are you trying to tell me something?


Well, this is interesting! Remember me wailing about my new Peugeot a year or so ago? (Still have it, still hate it.)
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Mike Filigenzi » Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:24 pm

Great question, John.

For us (family of three with frequent dinners serving up to eight or ten):

Cookware - These are the pots and pans that get used most:

The Le Creuset dutch oven - heavily used for braising
Three heavy saucepans, 1 quart, 2 quart, 4 quart (ours are Le Creuset and All-Clad)
Non-stick skillets - 6" and 10", and 12" (bought cheap at restaurant supply stores)
One good copper saute pan, about 10"
One big skillet - about 14" or so
One 10" Lodge cast iron skillet
Ancient, lightweight roasting pan with a rack that sits on top - for nearly all of our meat roasting

Knives:

1 really nice Japanese chef's knife (bought from the Japan Woodworker website)
1 Wusthof chef's knife
1 each bread knife, meat slicer, both of high quality
A bunch of paring knives, some pricey, some very cheap. (We buy the cheap French paring knives you can get at places like Sur La Table)

Pepper grinder: We use the Unicorn Magnum Plus. Not pretty enough for table service, but it holds a ton of pepper corns and dispenses a lot with each turn.

A good quality colander that is stored above the sink.

Pull-out cutting boards - In a small kitchen like ours, the increase in counter space they give us is significant.

Graters: a couple of different Microplanes for fine grating and a cheap box grater for coarser work.

The garlic press we use has a little blue thing that goes with it to clean out the little holes in the press. It's something like this one, but I actually prefer this type.

A heavy-duty ricer for mashed potatoes. Ours is like this one, but has interchangeable inserts to allow for coarse and fine ricing. We never seem to use the fine insert, though. Just make sure the thing is solid - we've bent our insert over the years.

A mandoline. Ours is the Bron but the Benriner version seems to work about as well for a lower price.

Kitchenaid stand mixer, Cuisinart processor.

There are also probably some baking-related items that my wife would put on the list, but I don't know them as well.
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jenise » Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:54 pm

Wow, John. The thing that surpised me most about this post is to realize that I've known you long enough that your kids, once little and in my mind frozen there in time, now have apartments of their own. Yikes, we're getting old!

Anyway, so many things come to mind but so few are reccomendable, because what anyone needs in a kitchen is so personal and many of the things I am bonded to are nameless/brandless things picked up who knows where along the way. If they're still here, they're useful--I'm ruthless about dumping anything that doesn't work out. But a quick perusal of my kitchen just now suggested a few things:

A salt keeper, at least one. The backstory on this: Bob bought me one for my birthday a few years ago. I had not wanted nor asked for it, and at first glance I despised it. But I recognized it from the Williams Sonoma catalog--Bob had pointed it out to me months before, testing my reaction, which apparently had not been nearly negative enough. :) I also remembered that it was priced at $50. Insane, I thought, for a little wood pot. But of course I had to use it, or pretend to, at least for awhile. In a matter of months, however, I completely reversed myself. It had become SO useful and integral to my kitchen that I not only loved it and wildly so, I bought a second one so that I had one on my prep counter and one at the stove. Williams Sonoma still sells them:

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/olive-wood-salt-keeper/?pkey=e%7Csalt%2Bkeeper%7C7%7Cbest%7C0%7C1%7C24%7C%7C1&cm_src=PRODUCTSEARCH||NoFacet-_-NoFacet-_-NoMerchRules-_-

What the picture won't make obvious to you: though WS sells one that's more modern and pleasing to my eye that's a straight cylinder vs. this one's downward curves, the curve is ergonomic and it fits beautifully in one's hand for each of the two ways one uses it. Say you're right handed like me. I either hold it in my left hand and flick the lid back with my left thumb while reaching in for a pinch with two fingers of my right hand, or I pick it up in my right hand and flick the lid back with my right thumb in order to apply a layer directly over a roast, say, or into a pan of boiling water. (Mind, I use only kosher salt directly in cooking, and these pots are oriented for the larger grain salts. The finer grain salt you and I grew up with gets under one's finger nails.)

Stainless steel hotel pans and bowls. Not great looking, except where functional is beautiful, a stack of stainless steel bowls I bought at a restaurant supply store (they might be a brand like ACCO) save my life every day. This company makes about six different sizes that all nest, but I chose just three sizes and bought three each of a large and medium bowl, and five smaller ones. I'd guess what I have are 2 qt, 4 qt and 6 qt, and because they nest they fit within the space required for just one of the six quart bowls. Any time I do a big project there are bowls all over the kitchen. I also adore hotel pans and own a number of different sizes. Because they're square sided and flat bottomed, they hold a lot in a relatively low profile. There's invariably one about 10-11" square in the refrigerator full of fruit, and anytime I marinate meat, fowl or fish this is what the ziploc bag resides in and what, quite often, the resulting meat roasts in if it's not going outside to the grill.

Two colanders. Everybody needs a bowl shaped one that sits in the bottom of the sink, but I also have a shallower (it's probably 4 inches deep) cheap aluminum flat bottomed one with a long handle on one side and a hook on the other that hangs from sink edge to sink edge. I have no idea where I got it, and it's not something I've seen elsewhere, but wherever I was when I saw this eons ago I knew instantly that it was something I could not do without and I was not wrong. It also hangs nicely in my tall 8 qt stock pot, making a large flat surface for steaming large vegetables, tamales, dumplings and even, sometimes, seafood.

Lots of tiny tools from Zyliss: this Swiss company makes the best little stuff. Peelers, pliers, zesters, you name it. They always work better than just about any other brand's version of the same thing, and they last. I also like the bright colors they make their tools in. When I reach into my drawer for the carrot peeler, I don't look for the peeling blade, I look for lime green and spot that a whole lot faster. Anything that makes me more efficient, I love.

My Japanese Benriner mandoline, the extra wide one (which is off white, where the standard is green). And a pounding tool. I have one that's a heavy flat approximately 4" wide disk on an offset handle and it's all one solid heavy piece of forged metal. You don't need one often, but you can't do without it. Williams Sonoma doesn't have the one I reccomend, but they have this one that's similar:

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/rosle-meat-pounder/?pkey=cmeat-seafood-tools&cm_src=meat-seafood-tools||NoFacet-_-NoFacet-_--_-
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Mark Lipton » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:35 pm

A cast iron skillet would one of the few essentials for me. I love my All-Clad pots and pans, but there are a lot of other alternatives to them. I also require a few good knives: an 8" chef's knife, kitchen shears and I've lately become devoted to my Santoku. Some prefer Wüsthof and others Henckels; to me, it's a personal judgement which you'll prefer. Another essential for me is a top quality blender. After years of trial and error we've settled one a heavy duty model made by Cuisinart: it's powerful, reliable, large and breaks down nicely for cleaning. An immersion blender is also quite useful and our Braun has stood the test of time. After that, it's all niceties and gizmos. :P

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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Carrie L. » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:43 pm

Jo Ann Henderson wrote:A good (but not perfect) set of pots I bought was in 1984 when I got a set of Belgique stainless steel cookware. I believe I got 8 pieces for about $250, which was a good deal of money for me at the time. To this day they are my go-to pots for everything. They never stick, they heat evenly, and most people can't believe I've had these pots longer than 5 years, as they clean up beautifully. Not certain you would get the same quality today if purchasing these same pans.



Jo Ann, I have the exact same set, given to me as a wedding gift (first marriage) back in 1989. They are great quality and have served me well over the years.
When I met Len, he was outfitting a home and as a friend, I helped him shop for household items. I recommended the Belgique since I'd had such great luck with them. Now, this was appx 10 years later (1999). They are horrible quality. Everything sticks to the sides and scorches. After a little research, I found that the set I got in the 80s was made in Belgium. The one Len bought was made in China. We've given those to charity now that we are married. :)
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Carrie L. » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:56 pm

What fun, John. Here are mine.

1) Microplane zester for lemon zest, grating garlic, nutmeg, hard cheeses, etc.
2) Turdeau Trulever Corkscrew (so quick!) http://www.amazon.com/Trudeau-Trulever-Corkscrew-Set-Tin/dp/B0026RH6A2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1352159122&sr=8-1&keywords=trudeau+corkscrew
3) This pot. http://www.amazon.com/Anolon-Advanced-Anodized-3-5-Quart-Straining/dp/B001CENW8A/ref=sr_1_15?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1352159301&sr=1-15&keywords=analon+pot
It is great for pasta, especially, since you can just strain the water out and not get a colander dirty. And it's just the right size for so many things, especially sauces and gravies.
4) An instant hot water spout at the sink (for making tea, etc.)
5) Warming drawer. Not only great for keeping food warm, will warm dishes before a dinner party, and doubles as extra storage (I use it as a bread box) when not in use.
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Fred Sipe » Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:21 pm

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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jo Ann Henderson » Tue Nov 06, 2012 2:40 pm

Carrie L. wrote:
Jo Ann Henderson wrote:A good (but not perfect) set of pots I bought was in 1984 when I got a set of Belgique stainless steel cookware. I believe I got 8 pieces for about $250, which was a good deal of money for me at the time. To this day they are my go-to pots for everything. They never stick, they heat evenly, and most people can't believe I've had these pots longer than 5 years, as they clean up beautifully. Not certain you would get the same quality today if purchasing these same pans.



Jo Ann, I have the exact same set, given to me as a wedding gift (first marriage) back in 1989. They are great quality and have served me well over the years.
When I met Len, he was outfitting a home and as a friend, I helped him shop for household items. I recommended the Belgique since I'd had such great luck with them. Now, this was appx 10 years later (1999). They are horrible quality. Everything sticks to the sides and scorches. After a little research, I found that the set I got in the 80s was made in Belgium. The one Len bought was made in China. We've given those to charity now that we are married. :)

Surprising, isn't it?! I looked up Belgique to follow the ratings on it before making this post so that I wouldn't be embarrassed by posting about an inferior product. I was really surprised at the comments about warping and separating. But, because I have had such great luck with these pots, I decided to post anyway. I also bought a nondescript, extra-large stainless steel saute pan about 25 years ago (can't even remember where I bought it) that I use for almost everything. Again, it is perfect in every way and I can't fathom departing with it. And a few chef's quality saute pans that cost no more than $20 each that I picked up from cash and carry. These inexpensive pans are the ones I enjoy the most, next to my Emil Henry. I have a Daniel Bouloud enamel covered cast iron Dutch oven that I love to look at, but it's just too heavy to drag out to cook with. I love looking at and touching it, but alas, I think I am going to pass along to the Salvation Army - sigh!
"...To undersalt deliberately in the name of dietary chic is to omit from the music of cookery the indispensable bass line over which all tastes and smells form their harmonies." -- Robert Farrar Capon
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Karen/NoCA » Tue Nov 06, 2012 3:16 pm

Fun thread and interesting reading.

I love my pot filler plumbed into the wall above my 6-burner cook top. Great to have there for filling large pasta and stock pots.
My salt keeper from Williams-Sonoma, sits by my stove. Actually two of them are there, one hold Maldon's Coarse Sea Flakes for a finish salt and the other Diamond Crystal coarse sea salt for general use.
The big black Magnum pepper grinder is used every day, it is a real workhorse
Microplane rasp for zesting citrus
The full freezer and full refrigerator in my laundry room are always full, besides a sub-zero in our kitchen. Keeping a well stocked pantry and produce available makes my cooking so much easier
A gadget called Fast Pasta has been a jewel for the two of us when we want pasta. I can cook enough for four in this plastic microwavable gadget. It does a great job of cooking smaller amounts.


http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=fasta+pasta+microwave+cooker&tag=googhydr-20&index=garden&hvadid=3117870527&hvpos=1t2&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1138431378510777091&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&ref=pd_sl_60z805ymn1_b

Instant hot water at my sink, makes a mug of tea so handy. I use it to warm the dogs kibble, and for a quick hot water release for frozen tomato sauce from the container, and so much more.

Le Crueset Dutch Ovens, 1 6 qt and a 3 qt. Plus two sauce pans
Kyocera chef's knife is used everyday. A set of Wusthoff knives which includes a bread knife are important
Boning knife
There is probably more, but this is just off the top of my head
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Mike Filigenzi » Tue Nov 06, 2012 7:07 pm

We have a fairly nice salt cellar that houses the Maldon next to the stove. That's contrasted with the ugly Tupperware salt cellar with the partially melted lid that holds the Kosher salt and which also sits next to the stove. Both work well.
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Carl Eppig » Thu Nov 08, 2012 3:07 pm

We used to be adverse to multi tasking things like printers that also copied and things like that. Not any more. Two kitchen items that we use daily are a Cuisinart Griddler, and a Cuisinart Convection Toaster Oven Broiler. These as well as a lightable gas stove top are very helpful during power outages. Our generator can handle them but not our oven, microwave, warmer wall.

Another item that we love for everyday use is a wooden block for knives. This is much better on them than drawers or magnetic bars. We turn ours sideways to take up less room.

For coffee we have used for decades including twelve years of B&B buniness, the system of running boiling water through a six cup filter into a 1 liter caraffe. We use six cup unbleached filters in a six cup plastic filter holder.

For pots and pans we use almost exclusively ScanPan products. If they wear out even after twenty years of use, they replace them with no questions asked. By wearing our, I mean losing their nonstck surface.

They previously referred to "wall" is or was all Viking electric. We did replace the microwave with a top of the line GE after the Viking wore out after five years. The oven and warmer are still in top working order.

You might check with neighbors about the frequency of power outages and normal duration of such. If it happens frequently you might want to consider a generator. We have a propane opporated Guardian Plus 12kw. It comes on automatically and shuts off automatically if it runs out of fuel or oil.
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Bill Spohn » Fri Nov 09, 2012 3:37 pm

Jenise wrote: And a pounding tool. I have one that's a heavy flat approximately 4" wide disk on an offset handle and it's all one solid heavy piece of forged metal. You don't need one often, but you can't do without it.


Funny, I have never felt the need for that. If moved to pound my meat...hmm, let me rephrase that...if I need to flatten foodstuffs, I always reach for my 60 year old flat bottomed cast iron frying pan. Also good for cracking nuts and self defence. We have a meat pounding mallet for tenderizing that my wife favours as it isn't as heavy (and isn't as likely to cause damage to counter tops if she is a bad aim).
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jeff Grossman/NYC » Fri Nov 09, 2012 5:06 pm

A rolling pin is sufficient.
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Fred Sipe » Fri Nov 09, 2012 9:25 pm

A bowling ball would be overkill.
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Karen/NoCA » Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:49 am

We used to be adverse to multi tasking things like printers that also copied and things like that. Not any more. Two kitchen items that we use daily are a Cuisinart Griddler, and a Cuisinart Convection Toaster Oven Broiler. These as well as a lightable gas stove top are very helpful during power outages. Our generator can handle them but not our oven, microwave, warmer wall.


Carl, I have the Cuisinart Griddler, as well. I like it but it is housed in my laundry room pantry. I have to drag it out to use, usually change griddles, then put it back when finished. I do the usual things with it, panini, and pancakes, but other than that....it gets no use. I suppose It should be left out. What do you do with yours? A big issue with me is that I go to great lengths to avoid grease splatters all over the place, so I do bacon outside on the grill side burner.
We use our grill all year long as it is under a large patio overhang and has a huge fan, and since Gene does all the grilling, it gives me some respite from having to do it all. Maybe I can get some ideas from your usage.
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by Jo Ann Henderson » Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:47 pm

Bill Spohn wrote:
Jenise wrote: And a pounding tool. I have one that's a heavy flat approximately 4" wide disk on an offset handle and it's all one solid heavy piece of forged metal. You don't need one often, but you can't do without it.


Funny, I have never felt the need for that. If moved to pound my meat...hmm, let me rephrase that...if I need to flatten foodstuffs, I always reach for my 60 year old flat bottomed cast iron frying pan. Also good for cracking nuts and self defence. We have a meat pounding mallet for tenderizing that my wife favours as it isn't as heavy (and isn't as likely to cause damage to counter tops if she is a bad aim).

I have this exact same meat pounder that Jenise has, and it has made all the difference in the uniformity of the end product, and a short time in achieving it. I used to also use a qt jar filled with water, rolling pin, wine bottles, etc. But, this is the bomb!
"...To undersalt deliberately in the name of dietary chic is to omit from the music of cookery the indispensable bass line over which all tastes and smells form their harmonies." -- Robert Farrar Capon
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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by John F » Sat Dec 01, 2012 11:06 pm

Jo Ann Henderson wrote:A good (but not perfect) set of pots I bought was in 1984 when I got a set of Belgique stainless steel cookware. I believe I got 8 pieces for about $250, which was a good deal of money for me at the time. To this day they are my go-to pots for everything. They never stick, they heat evenly, and most people can't believe I've had these pots longer than 5 years, as they clean up beautifully. Not certain you would get the same quality today if purchasing these same pans.

Over the years I have added other specialty pans, and if I were outfitting my kitchen again with cookware, I would definitely have the entire line of Emile Henry's Flame cookware. I have 4 pieces, and they are versatile, beautiful, and a marvel of modern cooking. I love and use frequently each piece.

My next beloved piece of equipment is my Kitchen Aid Deluxe Edition stand mixer, with meat grinder attachment. I added a year or so later the paddle blade called the side swiper, which I can't praise enough! I like to make cookies (almost weekly) and my favorite cookie scoops are made my Hamilton Beach which makes commercial grade food scoops. I've bought and used others, but these are fantastic! I have 3 sizes -- crabcake, ice cream, cookies.

I'll add more as I think of them. My kitchen appliances and supplies are such a part of me, it's hard to step back and think about the pieces individually. But, as it hits me, I'll add to the list. Good luck.

Boy, woudl I love to have this experience with you!!! :oops: :mrgreen:




Boy = that Emile Henry site is a real treasure trove....what do you think the grilling stone is for (vs. the pizza stone)?
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John F

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Re: New kitchen..could be fun for you guys and a big help to me

by John F » Sat Dec 01, 2012 11:13 pm

Mike Filigenzi wrote:Great question, John.

For us (family of three with frequent dinners serving up to eight or ten):

Cookware - These are the pots and pans that get used most:

The Le Creuset dutch oven - heavily used for braising
Three heavy saucepans, 1 quart, 2 quart, 4 quart (ours are Le Creuset and All-Clad)
Non-stick skillets - 6" and 10", and 12" (bought cheap at restaurant supply stores)
One good copper saute pan, about 10"
One big skillet - about 14" or so
One 10" Lodge cast iron skillet
Ancient, lightweight roasting pan with a rack that sits on top - for nearly all of our meat roasting

Knives:

1 really nice Japanese chef's knife (bought from the Japan Woodworker website)
1 Wusthof chef's knife
1 each bread knife, meat slicer, both of high quality
A bunch of paring knives, some pricey, some very cheap. (We buy the cheap French paring knives you can get at places like Sur La Table)

Pepper grinder: We use the Unicorn Magnum Plus. Not pretty enough for table service, but it holds a ton of pepper corns and dispenses a lot with each turn.

A good quality colander that is stored above the sink.

Pull-out cutting boards - In a small kitchen like ours, the increase in counter space they give us is significant.

Graters: a couple of different Microplanes for fine grating and a cheap box grater for coarser work.

The garlic press we use has a little blue thing that goes with it to clean out the little holes in the press. It's something like this one, but I actually prefer this type.

A heavy-duty ricer for mashed potatoes. Ours is like this one, but has interchangeable inserts to allow for coarse and fine ricing. We never seem to use the fine insert, though. Just make sure the thing is solid - we've bent our insert over the years.

A mandoline. Ours is the Bron but the Benriner version seems to work about as well for a lower price.

Kitchenaid stand mixer, Cuisinart processor.

There are also probably some baking-related items that my wife would put on the list, but I don't know them as well.


Huge help - some follow on thoughts:

- What do you find yourself using the copper skillet for vs. the others? How often and for what do you use the cast iron? Is it a hassle to get/keep it "seasoned?

- The ricer was most interesting....when we last "outfitted" we just had a single piece, handheld thingy you pressed down on the potatoes from above

- The Magnum totally rocks the grinder world - I have the smaller version. Do you use salt grinders at all? If so - when/why?
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