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Ghost pepper ideas

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Mark Lipton

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Ghost pepper ideas

by Mark Lipton » Mon Aug 19, 2013 12:33 pm

So, Jean decided to spruce up our herb planter with a few more plants and came back with a ginormous ghost pepper plant with ca. 20-30 peppers already on it. My question to you worthies is what recipes can you suggest to showcase these peppers to best effect. I am loath to substitute them for habaneros, as I expect that they have quite different flavors (it's not C. chinense but rather a putative C. chinense-C. frutescens hybrid). So what recipes would you suggest for them?

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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Shaji M » Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:16 pm

I faced the same dilemma when I saw saplings for the ghost pepper aka bhoot jalokia, at a local nursery. It is considered the hottest pepper. On a Scoville scale, it registers almost a million units, while the habanero comes in at a wimpy 100,000 units. I cannot imagine any recipes where this would do anything other than completely overwhelm everything else! Maybe it could be useful in reviving corpses or warding off zombies! :D
-Shaji
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Karen/NoCA » Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:39 pm

This was informative and a fun read.

http://north-by-northside.blogspot.com/2010/10/cooking-with-feared-ghost-pepper.html

A word of caution: One must be really careful when serving food that has heat from chile peppers. I had a friend who broke out in blisters and was miserable, while I never felt the heat in the dish. I did not know she had this problem and she did not know I cooked with chile peppers. :oops:
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Redwinger » Mon Aug 19, 2013 4:41 pm

Go to the local farmer's market and see if any of the vendors want to purchase them. :wink: For some strange reason there seems to be a market for them. An acquaintance had a bunch of these peppers a few years ago and I think the vendors gave him a buck or two for each.
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Mark Lipton » Mon Aug 19, 2013 6:15 pm

Redwinger wrote:Go to the local farmer's market and see if any of the vendors want to purchase them. :wink: For some strange reason there seems to be a market for them. An acquaintance had a bunch of these peppers a few years ago and I think the vendors gave him a buck or two for each.


Need any deer repellent, 'Winger? :mrgreen:

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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Jim Cassidy » Mon Aug 19, 2013 7:22 pm

Regarding how they would likely taste different than habeneros... Does the ghost pepper have a taste that we can perceive? It seems that something 10x hotter than habenero would have to be diluted as hell to be edible, and any flavor component might be too diluted to matter at that point.
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Shaji M » Mon Aug 19, 2013 8:36 pm

Jim Cassidy wrote: It seems that something 10x hotter than habenero would have to be diluted as hell to be edible...

You could neutralize some capsaicin with yogurt for instance. That might work. Volunteers?
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Mark Lipton » Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:32 pm

Jim Cassidy wrote:Regarding how they would likely taste different than habeneros... Does the ghost pepper have a taste that we can perceive? It seems that something 10x hotter than habenero would have to be diluted as hell to be edible, and any flavor component might be too diluted to matter at that point.


It all comes down to one's tolerance for capsaicin. I can comfortably eat very spicy food, so I find distinct taste differences between various pepper types, such as Jalapeño/Serrano vs. Habanero vs. Cayenne. I don't know if the ghost pepper is so hot that I'd have to dilute it beyond the point of getting its taste, but I suspect I'll find out.

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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Mark Lipton » Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:33 pm

Shaji M wrote:I faced the same dilemma when I saw saplings for the ghost pepper aka bhoot jalokia, at a local nursery. It is considered the hottest pepper. On a Scoville scale, it registers almost a million units, while the habanero comes in at a wimpy 100,000 units. I cannot imagine any recipes where this would do anything other than completely overwhelm everything else! Maybe it could be useful in reviving corpses or warding off zombies! :D
-Shaji


Nowadays, Shaji, the ghost pepper has been eclipsed by the Jamaican Scorpion pepper (or so says the font of all knowledge, Wikipedia)

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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Brian Gilp » Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:22 pm

No idea. However, have you tried the flesh of the pepper without any seeds or membrane? I found that I love the flavor of habanero and often use it this way to get the flavor without the heat. Do it right and there is not much heat at all. I would try this first to see if it even had a flavor I liked.

If I was looking for a way to use it for the first time I would probably dice up one without seeds or membrane and add it to a caramelizing onion. Then if the flavor is ok use them in a curry or on a burger or something.
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Shaji M » Tue Aug 20, 2013 10:21 pm

Mark Lipton wrote:
Nowadays, Shaji, the ghost pepper has been eclipsed by the Jamaican Scorpion pepper (or so says the font of all knowledge, Wikipedia)

Mark Lipton


Thanks Mark. I just read that. "Eclipsed" seems to be the mot just!
Also GeoCWeyer just posted on his growing both the varieties. viewtopic.php?f=5&t=48689
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Re: Ghost pepper ideas

by Bob Sisak » Sat Aug 24, 2013 7:08 pm

I got some ghost pepper extract from David Rosenblum last year to try in recipes that call for heat. I've used it in chili and hot wings. Just a few drops ramps up the heat quite a bit over the "normal" recipe. I'm not brave enough to try it on it's own. I haven't been able to discern any changes to the flavor profile of the dishes - just the added heat.
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