Possible explanation for increases in gluten sensitivity?

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Re: Possible explanation for increases in gluten sensitivity?

Postby Mark Lipton » Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:18 pm

Fred Sipe wrote:Mark,

I admit I am blindly swayed by much of the fearmongering regarding bad stuff in our food supplies. It just seems that we have blindly "progressed" in the ways of food production simply so fewer can feed more. And that just seems wrong.

I don't pretend to understand the actual science behind these modifications but it scares hell out of me. Just passed this article along as food for thought for those interested and to see what greater minds than mine think of it.

Thanks for your learned explanation. Now, where can I find some spelt bread to try. :)


I am far more concerned about what's been done to corn, which truly now is a Frankencrop. If you haven't read Michael Pollan's excellent Omnivore's Dilemma, you really should, as it lays out the issues very clearly in language that anyone (almost) can understand.

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Re: Possible explanation for increases in gluten sensitivity?

Postby Fred Sipe » Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:01 pm

Agree about the corn. I don't even consider it a healthy food anymore in any form. And the fact that it is feed for our meat supply is a double whammy. And of course, HFS.

I still don't know if a sugar is a sugar is a sugar. Is it worse than "dehydrated cane syrup?"
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Re: Possible explanation for increases in gluten sensitivity?

Postby Mark Lipton » Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:05 am

Fred Sipe wrote:Agree about the corn. I don't even consider it a healthy food anymore in any form. And the fact that it is feed for our meat supply is a double whammy. And of course, HFS.

I still don't know if a sugar is a sugar is a sugar. Is it worse than "dehydrated cane syrup?"


Perhaps predictably, I am less alarmist about HFCS than most. It's basically a mixture of glucose and fructose, which are the two constituents of table sugar. The ratio of the two in HFCS is designed to replicate the 1:1 ratio in table sugar. To me, the real issue is the ubiquity of HFCS, sugar, cane syrup and other sweeteners in all sorts of prepared foods. Most Americans are getting so much sugar in so-called "savory" foods that it totally skews their palate. This is probably the single biggest contributor to the growing epidemic of obesity in this country.

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