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wrcstl

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Another brining band wagon comment and a new found food

by wrcstl » Mon May 15, 2006 10:49 am

I am rebelling against gas grills and started the charcoal grill for some grilled chicken breasts. I brined the breast for 2-3 hours and after taking them off the grill they were unbelievably moist. One comment, don't let chicken set in the brine as long as pork or beef as it will quickly absorb any flavors. I recommend 2 hours.

Quail eggs, my latest dicovery for easy, cheap and exciting appetizers. You buy them in the can from an Asian market at about $1.40 per can of 24. Make a yogurt, capers, shallot, lemon juice et all dip, put it on a tray with some pickled beets and it becomes the hit of the appetizer table. You can also tell people how long they take to peel and some even believed me when I told them the male eggs were better than the female eggs. Maybe I need to find a smarter crowd. Fun appetizer at our neighborhood progressive dinner.
Walt
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Mike Filigenzi

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Re: Another brining band wagon comment and a new found food

by Mike Filigenzi » Mon May 15, 2006 1:05 pm

Once in a while, our corner market will get fresh quail eggs in. Whenever my seven-year-old sees them, she demands we buy a couple to take home and eat raw.


Mike
"People who love to eat are always the best people"

- Julia Child
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wrcstl

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Wine guru

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886

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Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:20 pm

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St. Louis

Re: Another brining band wagon comment and a new found food

by wrcstl » Mon May 15, 2006 1:43 pm

Mike Filigenzi (Sacto) wrote:Once in a while, our corner market will get fresh quail eggs in. Whenever my seven-year-old sees them, she demands we buy a couple to take home and eat raw.


Mike


Mike,
You can get fresh quail eggs at our Asian market but unless you were doing something other than hard boiling them or satisfying a 7 year old's curiousity it seems like a waste. Bought three cans for $4.20 and ended up with 72 eggs. They taste identical to a chicken egg but seem to have a larger yolk to white ratio. We thought about making deviled eggs but don't think the whites are thick enough to stand alone on the plate. May still try it just to see the expression on the faces of people looking at a miniture deviled egg.
Walt

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