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Ian Sutton

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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Ian Sutton » Sun Sep 30, 2007 7:56 pm

Some older TN's just to set us running (Amazed how few I've taken meaningful notes on - though probably that's because I have, but they're spread across the aussie wine fora :oops: . In particular 3 or 4 notes on Craiglee Shiraz, all 1-2 line tasting 'vibes' :? ):

N.B. The Best's is a one-off bottling from a frost affected year - effectively a blend across the normal Bin 0 Shiraz and the Thomson Family version.

Tower Estate is a venture led by the late Len Evans. Quite pricey wines, so happy to pick up some of these (and the 99 Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon) at ~ a quarter of retail price at auction 8)

Lindemans used to be a great name in Aussie wine. Their old semillons & shiraz are sought after wines, albeit somewhat variable in their dotage. These days there are 3 decent reds (this, the St George Cabernet and the Pyrus Bordeaux blend). I recall they may have restarted the semillons, but I may be wrong. Most of the wine under this label is now in the mass produced Bin range - Bin 40, Bin 45, Bin 50 etc. For once the term 'Bin' is apt (IMO of course).

1999 Best's Shiraz Great Western F.H.T. Concongella Vineyard - Australia, Victoria (10/2/2005)
Restrained, tight & still very youthful, this really still isn't giving up much. Very dark purple, red-purple at the rim - little sign of age. Very restrained, subtle but stylish nose of blackberries, black cherries & mocha-coffee. Blackcurrant joins in on the palate, but the fruit is very much in the background to the tannins and acid. As it stands, this is better with food, but what's in the background tastes very good, so I'm banking (or hoping) it will come through with some style later.
If you just have 1 or 2, then leave for a few years more before opening.

1991 Lindemans Shiraz Cabernet Limestone Ridge Vineyard - Australia, South Australia, Limestone Coast, Coonawarra (6/26/2005)
Very impressive. There's great balance to this wine, which whilst showing lovely secondary characters, still had a depth of fruit to support it. Acidity was in balance & had softened nicely. The overall impression was of no dominant traits, but a very subtle and integrated wine. Still plenty of life left in this, however if I had any more I'd probably drink them over the next year or two as it's drinking so well now. Better than the last bottle (c. 3 months ago), so some subtle bottle variation, which is expected.

2000 Tower Estate Shiraz - Australia, New South Wales, Hunter Valley (4/29/2007)
Good depth of spicy fruit, with a touch of licorice (more noticeable on palate than nose) and a hint of leather. Acidity is nice and refreshing with just a touch of bitterness. Good long finish.

1999 Best's Shiraz Great Western F.H.T. Concongella Vineyard - Australia, Victoria (11/5/2006)
Colour is an opaque purple with only fractional lightening at the edge. Very rich heady nose of spice blackberry and a little mint/menthol along with a touch of mocha coffee. The palate follows through with rich fruit in a similar vein to the nose, albeit with a nice savoury edge coming through on the finish. Tannins are softening and acidity nicely balanced and offering some refreshment whilst making the fruit seem more juicy. A great bottle and much more open and enticing than the previous bottle.

Anyway - in the true spirit of wine focus, I'll try and open a couple of bottles when I get the chance this month (bit of a gap in the middle to accomodate an Italy trip 8) )

regards

Ian
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Bob Ross

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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Bob Ross » Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:50 pm

I'll post some older notes to add some more to the Focus for the month; I'm not drinking wine for a month, but will taste a few, and will seek out a couple Aussies:

WTN: 2002 Yalumba Winery The Signature Cabernet Sauvignon 56% and Shiraz 44% Barossa Australia. http://www.yalumba.com/ 14.5% alcohol. Imported by Negociants USA Inc. Napa California. $45 from Andrea Robinson Wine Club.

I tried this wine and reported on it last May; I've now had a chance to try it with another six months of bottle age, and enjoy it even more than I did then.

Deep ruby red color, deep hue, intense aroma of cherries and currants with hints of tobacco and licorice and pepper, very good fruit tastes, hints of pepper and tobacco and an intense licorice note; medium mouth feel, good tannins and light acidity in good balance with the fruit, exceptionally long finish with notes of earth, fruit, pepper and that same licorice. A little smoother than six months ago; I'm very happy that I took Robinson's advice and bought a few more bottles. Very good EGA persisting even 12 hours later with interesting minty notes. 4*+.

2005 Pure Love Wines Desert Eagle Shiraz Barossa Valley Australia. 14.5%. $16.99 at Beekman, Glen Rock. Distributor not on label. "One Hundred Percent Pure Shiraz."

Deep red color, deep hue, excellent aroma of berries, spice and earth, restrained fruit and spice tastes hidden a bit by very firm tannins, but very promising with a few years of cellaring, medium mouth feel, a very long finish with wonderful spice, earth and fruit notes. A light oakiness that is quite pleasing. Very promising and very unusual at this price point from the Barossa. 3* now, but I'm sure it will be much more satisfying with cellar age. No EGA; served in plastic cups for legal reasons [!]. The eagle on the label is just wonderful, worth $17 just to own him.

d'Arenberg The Laughing Mapie Shiraz Viognier McLaren Vale Australia 2005. Chester Osborn, winemaker. http://darenberg.com/ Kookaburra are black and white birds; the wine is a blend of black and white grapes, and the winemakers daughters got naming rights. [Can you believe two Aussie kids can't pronounce "Kookaburra"?] Dark purple color, deep hue, good berry aromas and tastes, mild tannins, medium finish. OK and not too oaky but it didn't show me much tonight. 3*. About $20. [As a cheap skate, I'll probably buy a bottle or two and then laud this stuff to the skies. :-)]

Barossa Valley Estate E&E Black Pepper Shiraz Barossa Valley Australia 2003. 14.0% alcohol. Stuart Bourne, winemaker. http://www.bve.com.au/ [Not much of a site, frankly, unless you want their email address.] Deep red color, deep hue, intense aroma and tastes of fruit, chocolate, berries and earth, strong tannins, predominantly oak, long finish. If you like these big Aussie wines, this one is supposedly cultish and in demand. Maybe ok for the investor? Not for me, but hey, it's your money folks. 4*. $80.

Green Point Winery Shiraz Yarra Valley Reserve Australia 2004. http://www.greenpointwines.com Tony Jordan, James Gosper and Matt Steele, winemakers. http://www.greenpointwines.com Deep red color, deep hue, intense aromas and tastes, long finish, big, big wine, ok if you like the style, NOT for me, 3*. $25. [The price won't tempt me; I'd enjoy a Yellow Tail more.]

Groom Wines Sauvignon Blanc Adelaide Hills Australia 2006. http://www.groomwines.com Daryl Groom, winemaker. Lenswood appellation. WS's take: "Australia's # 1 Top Value Sauvignon Blanc - Groom Adelaide Hills 90 points Lithe and aromatic, with juicy nectarine, lime, mineral and floral herb flavors competing for attention. Refreshing finish." Harvey Steiman got this exactly right to my taste. 4*. $18 in US from winery; around $12 in NJ; great QPR. Gotta search this one out.

Hardys Shiraz South Australia Eileen Hardy 2001. http://www.hardys.com.au Peter Dawson winemaker. Deep red color, deep hue, complex fruit and earth aromas and taste, full mouth feel, long finish. Big Aussie Shiraz; very nice of its style. 3* for me, but if you like Big Aussies, this one deserves a much higher score. $90.


Leasingham Shiraz Clare Valley Classic Clare Australia 2005. http://www.leasingham-wines.com.au Kerri Thompson, winemaker. Deep red color, deep hue, intense fruit and spice aroma and taste, medium mouth feel, long finish. Beautiful example of an Aussie Shiraz. 4*+. Price???

Peter Lehmann Wines Clancy's Barossa Australia 2004. Shiraz 48%, Cabernet Sauvignon 42% and Merlot 15%. 14.5% alcohol. Andrew Wigan, winemaker. A very pretty example of a Barossa blend, understated and underoaked. A perfect beginner's wine and a great QPR for OF's like me. 4*. $13.

Penfolds Shiraz South Australia St. Henri 2002. http://www.penfolds.com Peter Gago winemaker. This was one of the nicest St. Henri vintages I've tasted. Deep red color, deep hue, intense dark fruit and spice, good acidity and tannins in great blance, long interesting finish. 4*+. $40.

Rosemount Estates Rosemount Syrah McLaren Vale Balmoral Australia 2002. http://www.rosemountestates.com Charles Whish winemaker. Deep red color, deep hue, very good fruit and spice aromas and tastes, medium mouth feel, long finish with spice notes. 3*+. $45. Where did Charles get that last name? "Whish" -- ineffective cricket bowler? Man, I don't get it -- he's hitting like my Yankees. But the wine shows promise.

Two Hands Wines Shiraz Barossa Valley Bella's Garden Australia 2005. http://www.twohandswines.com Matthew Wenk winemaker. Deep red color, deep hue, intense aromas and tastes of cherry and plum flavors, very good spice, mineral and mint notes, medium mouth feel, long intense finish with fruit, spice, mint and mineral notes. Lovely wine. 5*. $40. I have to search this one out; really there was almost no oak and a great deal of subtlety. A very very pretty wine.

2005 Rusden Stockade Shiraz Barossa Valley Australia. Endless Vines, Franklin Lakes, $8.50 a glass. 14% alcohol. Deep purple color, deep hue, good aroma of berries and spice with a smoky tinge; good fruit, berry spice and smoke tastes, medium mouth feel, light oak, medium tannins, firm acidity, a bit out of balance, long berry finish with a sense of acidity which I found off putting -- it didn't go away with swirling or over a half hour in the glass. Otherwise, would have been quite a nice wine. 2*+.

Regards, Bob
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:50 pm

Good points Ian. I was forgetting that many producers might only produce Cab Sauv. As you say, once the experts sign we will have tons of info/insights hopefully!

Before my Shiraz splurge, just opened a Baco Noir from Ontario. Chalk and cheese eh.

edit 3am Monday. I just noticed the posts from Bob R and Ian, posted around same time. All great minds think alike!

Ian, I am looking at an `04 Gt Best Western Shiraz something at my local. Maybe too young? I have always been a Riesling fan from this winery, some aged nicely.
BTW, is Bests and Bests Gt Western same company?

Bob R...that Two Hands, is it a RMP fruit bomb?!! The wines from Leasingham should be looked out for this month, that is for sure.

Have either of you too experts (wink) come across Heartland? A new venture with 3/4 winemakers involved? Langhorne Creek appellation with Ben Glaetzer to the forefront.
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Bob Ross » Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:16 pm

I haven't seen a Parker review, Bob. Apart from my own ecstatic review above, here are what some of the real experts write about the Two Hands Wines Shiraz Barossa Valley Bella's Garden:d

Josh Raynolds
Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar, Jul/Aug 07
($60) Opaque inky ruby. Powerful blue and black fruit aromas are complicated by pungent floral tones and cracked pepper. Resinous dark berry and plum flavors possess admirable depth and sweetness, with youthfully firm tannins adding support. Gains brightness with air, taking on raspberry and exotic orange zest qualities. Finishes with a lively berry skin flavor and outstanding persistence. 94 points


winemaker's notes:

Dense purple red almost black. A powerful nose of ripe plums and succulent blackberries laced with a hint of cedar spice.

Bella's as always shows amazing depth and power whilst maintaining an elegant fruit purity. Matured in all French oak, the majority being seasoned barrels, allowing the fruit to do the talking with only the merest hint of cedar oak to support the ripe plum and mulberry flavours. Finely woven tannins produce a long linear wine forming a race track like structure along the palate. Great length and persistency of flavour.


Also:

Deep red to the core with a soft ruby red hue. Beautiful bright aromas of red cherry, rhubarb and soft spice characters.

Samantha's Garden is the most understated of the Garden Series with its fine elegant tannin structure and lean vibrant red fruits. Although medium bodied, this wine displays power and a solid core of intense complex fruit, backed by the subtle lift of seasoned French oak. A long and persistent finish.
Two Hands, Web Site.


A Customer - Garland Texas
The Two Hands 2005 Bella's Garden is a stunning Australian Shiraz/Syrah. Lucious, rich/very full bodied, amazing fruit that coats the tounge and lasts and lasts. (The color also lasts on the tounge, lips, teeth, etc. this is a highly saturated wine!). For all the power, it is very smooth as well and thus quite easy to drink "too much". The high WS rating is right on in this case. And it also got the "Wow, this is good!" from company we had over recently.



James Halliday 93 points!
“Most developed colour of the Two Hands’ shirazs; spicy, earthy blackberry aromas and flavours; good tannin balance.”
James Halliday, Australian Wine Companion 2008


Wine Spectator 95 Points! The Barossa bottling edges to the top in most vintages, and this is no exception. Rich and complex, this layered with green olive, mint, mineral and licorice aound a plump core of black cherry and dark plum flavors that linger on the intense and beautifully focused finish. Best from 2008 through 2017.


As noted, I haven't seen a Parker review, but he has rated the 2003 Bella Garden 95 and the 2004 Bella Garden 94.

I can remember the complexity of this wine even now. It has 14.5% alcohol, on the low side for Aussies, but high for my usual personal preference -- a retailer here has an amusing typo: "Alcohol 145.8%".

Some people might call this a Parker Fruit Bomb, Bob -- but I loved it and don't usually care for the PFBs I've tried.

Regards, Bob
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Ian Sutton » Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:29 pm

Bob Parsons Alberta. wrote:Ian, I am looking at an `04 Gt Best Western Shiraz something at my local. Maybe too young? I have always been a Riesling fan from this winery, some aged nicely.
BTW, is Bests and Bests Gt Western same company?

Bob R...that Two Hands, is it a RMP fruit bomb?!! The wines from Leasingham should be looked out for this month, that is for sure.

Have either of you too experts (wink) come across Heartland? A new venture with 3/4 winemakers involved? Langhorne Creek appellation with Ben Glaetzer to the forefront.

Bob
Best's is my laziness for the full name Best's Great Western. The 04 whilst I'm sure drinkable young, is kind of missing the benefit of these wines. They don't make tricked up 'drink me quick' wines and do gain complexity in the cellar. I'd recommend buying a bottle or two, though do see if you can cellar one for 5-10 years or longer. They have a small 'museum' release program, but the prices are ambitious for these 'ready aged' wines. Value wise it doesn't stack up against home cellaring.

I've not been impressed with Heartland - perhaps better to trade up to Mitolo (same winemaker - or at least was 2-3 years ago), but these are much more in the mainstream of big-fruited South Australian wines. In Langhorne Creek there's one winery (and to be fair one wine) that really lights my fire - Bleasdale 'Frank Potts'. It's generally pretty complex from the off (mainly due to it being a dog's dinner of different varieties!). It's reputed to keep, but my patience isn't that good :oops: . What's more it should come in under the Can$25 mark. They also do a Malbec, which might pique your interest :wink:

... and your attempts for sneaky revision have been noted. I shall be reporting you to invigilator Garr if this continues :twisted:

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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Mon Oct 01, 2007 10:14 pm

... and your attempts for sneaky revision have been noted. I shall be reporting you to invigilator Garr if this continues Twisted Evil

OK I admit I have been busted.

Please Robin I promise not to mix, ever again, with those unhealthy types on the Oz forum. Heck, what were you doing there Ian?!! Those pics of you drinking Grange with 3 blondes were very tasty, LOL.

Bests and Heartland? Thanks for the imput, I am keen on the Best GW rieslings and do not need to cellar any more reds right now! Heartland has been tasted by DeVines staff, some ho-hum comments from them.

I see you did not feature Paracombe (Adelaide Hills) on your list. Just as well as I have just pulled a Shiraz/Viognier from my cellar. Two guns blazing at 16.5%. What have I let myself in for.
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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by David Cobbold » Tue Oct 02, 2007 11:52 am

On the subjest of shiraz/syrah, a couple of comments :

1). Both spellings (and many more) were current in southern France in the late 19th century. It happens that the first version stuck with the cuttings that went from France to Austalia at that time.

2). The stylistic differences obviously have much more to do with climate than with country (or name). Certain cool climate Australian shiraz are closer to northern Rhône versions than are some from France's Languedoc. Similar differences exist in South Africa.

3). To be practical, I suggest you add to the recommended list certain vintages of Margaret River's Cape Mentelle (one of the pioneers of this grape in Western Australia) and an interesting newcomer from Victoria called Sutton Grange (and their second label Fairbank)
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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Tue Oct 02, 2007 1:15 pm

I said:
Hi David..are you in Australia? Sutton Grange eh Ian Sutton is a valued forumite here, he`s from the UK!!
Ian`s list is a good one and should help those who want to take part here but not sure about Oz wines. Cape Mentelle is a fave of mine, especially their Zinfandel but pricey. One really has to check on the alc content, one here 16.5%. Whoops.



OK I see you are in France after reading main forum. No need to reply, thanks.
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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Jackson Brooke » Tue Oct 02, 2007 4:08 pm

I'd just like to make a quick note on reading the alcohol labels on Aussie wines - particularly when discussing the Parker fruit bombs (I love that it's so widely recognized).

In Australia the law only actually requires the label to be within 1.5% of the actual alcohol. That means that when you read 16.5%, although it may indeed be correct, it may also only be 15% (listen to me, only 15%!).

The point I'm trying to make is that in many cases a winery may print the labels well before they actually know the true ABV.

I'm a young Aussie wine maker (currently in the US making Vodka) and would also like to say that the best way to take an educated guess regarding the Shiraz and finding a complex, reasonable alcohol, savory and balanced wine is to look at climate and vintage. With these in mind the best regions have already been mentioned (WA, VIC, and NSW rather than SA, however the Hills are cooler, Coonawarra is cooler and the last few years have been hot hot hot, the whole country over - so good luck!

Most of this info has has already been pointed out, so I hate to repeat what other people have said any longer and because I'm young I haven't the tasting experience of many of you, I have however tasted the Dalwhinnie - which I think is probably my fav Aus Shiraz even though it was 05 and very, very tight.
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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Bob Parsons Alberta » Tue Oct 02, 2007 4:38 pm

Welcome Jackson, good to have you here with us. This is going to be a great month on Focus. Lots of good folks here, many international members too.
Which wineries in Australia have you worked with?
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Sue Courtney » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:04 pm

Ian Sutton wrote: .... and as a wider rule, to veer from the Parker style, it's better to avoid Barossa/McClaren Vale and indeed much of South Australia.


Mon Dieu! You need to drink more South Australian wines. How can you possibly avoid Barossa or McLaren Vale and indeed much of South Australia. Sure, some are definitely over the top, but there are some very beautiful Shirazes from these regions.
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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Jenise » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:15 pm

Jackson Brooke wrote: I have however tasted the Dalwhinnie - which I think is probably my fav Aus Shiraz even though it was 05 and very, very tight.


We were quite taken with Dalwhinnie when we toured the Warrenmang region back in 2000 with Murray Almond, so much so that when a few bottles popped up at auction recently at $12.50/ea, I grabbed them up. But back to the winery, while there we tasted a wine out of barrel that he was going to call Eagle-something or something-Eagle, can't remember the name, and charge some astonishing (by Aussie standards of the time) price for. I've often wondered how that venture fared--any idea?
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Robin Garr » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:27 pm

Sue Courtney wrote:Mon Dieu! You need to drink more South Australian wines. How can you possibly avoid Barossa or McLaren Vale and indeed much of South Australia. Sure, some are definitely over the top, but there are some very beautiful Shirazes from these regions.


Sue, this is true, and Coriole comes to mind as one McLaren Vale producer I've been particularly fond of. From a US perspective, though, it seems - as I mentioned in yesterday's <I>Wine Advisor</I> - that some distillation of the market occurs as exports tend toward the "gobby" style that's considered likely to win points.
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Sue Courtney » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:41 pm

Robin Garr wrote:
Sue Courtney wrote:Mon Dieu! You need to drink more South Australian wines. How can you possibly avoid Barossa or McLaren Vale and indeed much of South Australia. Sure, some are definitely over the top, but there are some very beautiful Shirazes from these regions.


Sue, this is true, and Coriole comes to mind as one McLaren Vale producer I've been particularly fond of. From a US perspective, though, it seems - as I mentioned in yesterday's <I>Wine Advisor</I> - that some distillation of the market occurs as exports tend toward the "gobby" style that's considered likely to win points.

All I can say, is the truth is in the tasting. This is why I blind taste wherever possible. I'm not affected by knowing what the label is and what someone else has or has not awarded it. I can make the assessment of the wine judged on my own palate and that alone.

I always remember Coriole for the Mulberry tree growing near the winery, which was dripping with juicy ripe fruit when I was there. There was also another McLaren Vale producer that was highly thought of a few years back, but hardly ever mentioned now, and that is Cascabel.
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Robin Garr » Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:03 pm

Sue Courtney wrote:All I can say, is the truth is in the tasting. This is why I blind taste wherever possible. I'm not affected by knowing what the label is and what someone else has or has not awarded it. I can make the assessment of the wine judged on my own palate and that alone.


Sue, of course, and I never meant to suggest otherwise. I think I may not have made my point as clearly as I wished, though: It's my belief that Australia tends to export its more "gobby" Shiraz to the US in the belief that this is to American tastes, since the big-name American critics seem to love it. I expect NZ gets a fairer share of a more diverse collection.

I always remember Coriole for the Mulberry tree growing near the winery, which was dripping with juicy ripe fruit when I was there.


My memories of the property at Coriole are similarly warm, but have to do with the amazing flower gardens that were blooming everywhere there in a very mild November.
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Jenise » Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:04 pm

Sue Courtney wrote:I always remember Coriole for the Mulberry tree growing near the winery, which was dripping with juicy ripe fruit when I was there. There was also another McLaren Vale producer that was highly thought of a few years back, but hardly ever mentioned now, and that is Cascabel.


Coriole was one of our favorite two McClaren Vale wineries, the other was Wirra Wirra. Both were wineries not previously encountered here, and I think we favored them because they seemed atypical.

Cascabel is and isn't McClaren Vale, they're actually quite a ways south on the Fleurieu Peninsula, far enough to be in another microclimate. We see the wines here, an importer friend has carried her wines in the past, but the price was always a bit of a problem. Americans just didn't want to pay $35 for tempranillo from Oz.
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Sue Courtney » Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:31 pm

Jenise wrote:
Sue Courtney wrote:I always remember Coriole for the Mulberry tree growing near the winery, which was dripping with juicy ripe fruit when I was there. There was also another McLaren Vale producer that was highly thought of a few years back, but hardly ever mentioned now, and that is Cascabel.


Coriole was one of our favorite two McClaren Vale wineries, the other was Wirra Wirra. Both were wineries not previously encountered here, and I think we favored them because they seemed atypical.

Cascabel is and isn't McClaren Vale, they're actually quite a ways south on the Fleurieu Peninsula, far enough to be in another microclimate. We see the wines here, an importer friend has carried her wines in the past, but the price was always a bit of a problem. Americans just didn't want to pay $35 for tempranillo from Oz.

Jenise,
You could call all the McLaren Vale wineries 'Fleurieu Peninsula' if you wanted to. From the Fleurieu Peninsula website "McLaren Vale is the Fleurieu Peninsula’s largest wine region – and also the closest to Adelaide."
Good marketing ploy by your US agent.
Cascabel is not very far south of Foxes Creek and Pirramimma in actual fact. Definitely on the Adelaide side of the hills.
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Ian Sutton » Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:40 pm

Bob Parsons Alberta. wrote:Those pics of you drinking Grange with 3 blondes were very tasty, LOL.

Very tasty indeed. 3 blondes you say? Not interested in them if there's Grange open :wink:
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Re: Okay, guys, what you like for October?

by Ian Sutton » Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:48 pm

Sue Courtney wrote:
Ian Sutton wrote: .... and as a wider rule, to veer from the Parker style, it's better to avoid Barossa/McClaren Vale and indeed much of South Australia.


Mon Dieu! You need to drink more South Australian wines. How can you possibly avoid Barossa or McLaren Vale and indeed much of South Australia. Sure, some are definitely over the top, but there are some very beautiful Shirazes from these regions.


ahh but Sue, did I say I avoided them :wink: Just that if I want to veer from the 'Parker' style I'll avoid Barossa. Nor indeed am I saying all Barossa is in the 'Parker' style - just that it's generally nearer than (say) the Yarra Valley. I'm happy to admit to having Barossa, McClaren Vale and other 'hotspots' bottles in the cellar. I enjoy them when in the mood, just as I might on other nights fancy a Marg River Cabernet, a Piemonte Nebbiolo or a Hawkes Bay Bordaux blend 8)

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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Ian Sutton » Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:52 pm

Jenise wrote:
Jackson Brooke wrote: I have however tasted the Dalwhinnie - which I think is probably my fav Aus Shiraz even though it was 05 and very, very tight.


We were quite taken with Dalwhinnie when we toured the Warrenmang region back in 2000 with Murray Almond, so much so that when a few bottles popped up at auction recently at $12.50/ea, I grabbed them up. But back to the winery, while there we tasted a wine out of barrel that he was going to call Eagle-something or something-Eagle, can't remember the name, and charge some astonishing (by Aussie standards of the time) price for. I've often wondered how that venture fared--any idea?


Jenise
The Eagle Shiraz is still going AFAIK, but I'm sure I'll never taste it - the price is up there as a 'Grange chaser'.
regards
Ian
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Jackson Brooke

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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Jackson Brooke » Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:23 pm

At $12.50 each, you'd be right to grab them!!

When I had the 05 in April this year (and in Australia) it was over $50!
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Bob Ross

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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Bob Ross » Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:27 pm

I'm not sure that the "Shiraz" name accompanied the grape cuttings to Australia with Busby, David.

The earliest references in Australian sources I've seen are to "Scyras"; see for example Australia as it is: Its Settlements, Farms, and Gold Fields, by Francis Lancelott, 1852, and an 1840s source I've misplaced by Sir William Macarthur. Folks I've spoken with believe Australians converted "Scyras" into "Shiraz", so that today "Shiraz" is considered strine for "Scyras".

Both Peter May at http://www.winelabels.org/artsyr.htm
and Robin Garr at http://www.wineloverspage.com/wines/wt011401.shtml
as well as many other authors buy into this explanation.

If you have any early Australian evidence to the contrary, I would love to see it.

Linguist history aside, both Peter's and Robin's links are very interesting additions to this month's Wine Focus.

Regards, Bob
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Jackson Brooke

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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Jackson Brooke » Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:31 pm

I finished my study in 05 and have worked at a winery called Wedgetail Estate, in the Yarra Valley and my last vintage in Australia was at Brown Brothers in North Eastern Victoria.

My Study was at Lincoln in NZ, so I'm a little familiar with the wines over there, particularly the South Island and before I went over I worked at a wine retailer in Melbourne (my boss was not of a mind with one R Parker).

Another Shiraz thinking on that is Ron Laughtons, Jaspar Hill out of Heathcote. He does a Georgies Blend and a Sally's blend (I think) - both exceptional if you can find them.

Having now spilled my guts, I should say that I am here for learning and suggestions (having not the time or money to taste very much) as much as putting in my own comment and have been impressed with the extensive suggestions so far.
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Re: For October: Oz Shiraz, it's NOT all Gobby Gunk!

by Jackson Brooke » Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:36 pm

I don't seem to have included the quotes I was replying too, As such, Bob and Jenise, the last posts were in reply to your comments.

thanks Jackson
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