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WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by François Audouze » Tue Jun 13, 2006 4:14 am

As I had to prepare the wines for the « academy for ancient wines », I had time to go to the « maison du Japon » (Japan’s house) where there was a tasting of wines of Beaumes de Venise. The lovely Japanese woman who prepared the event and insisted that I come welcomes me with a large smile which is more Parisian than Japanese. I am not very fond of the muscats, as it is always the same. So when you have drunk them 50 times, it is time to try something else. I have more nice surprises with the reds, very simple wines, but genuine when they are well made. I try some sushi and other preparations of a pure elegance, and I leave this meeting.

The academy will hold its third official meeting in Résidence Maxim’s. We had used up to now another place where we could eat cheese, but cheese for a long tasting becomes a little boring. So, we tried the idea of a dinner. I worked on that with a very motivated team, and an intelligent chef who listened to me and simplified his recipes. The team really wanted to succeed.

At 3 pm, I begin to open the bottles, some people coming to help me and to try to catch some tricks that I use by opening the bottles. We talk with pleasure and among more than 40 bottles, there are no corked bottles. Two bottles have a very low fill. One seems really dead. The others will take benefit from oxygen, which will cure all the small imperfections that I can imagine from their smell.

Despite a strike of the Underground (French metro), almost everyone is on time. I had prepared in case of late arrivals that we begin with the champagne that my family used to drink : champagne Léon Camuzet NV from Vertus, probably aged with 15 years. It has already a very pleasant evolved taste, and I could see among the crowd of nearly 50 people the ones who were already ready to accept such tastes and the ones who were not. They will have learned a lot tonight.

We are approximately 50 for 50 wines. The wines are split in 3 groups, in order that everyone drinks approximately 17 to 19 wines. Here is the detailed list, by order of service :

Group 1 : Champagne Léon Camuzet environ 15 ans - Champagne Gonet 1973 - vin nature de champagne Saran, blanc de blancs Moët 1950 - Bâtard Montrachet Chanson 1959 - Montrachet domaine Bichot 1943 - Château Saint Georges, St Georges St Emilion 1961 - Château Taillefer Puisseguin Saint-Emilion 1966 - Château La Louvière rouge 1967 - Chateau La Gaffelière 1949 - Château Montrose 1934 - Château Gruaud Larose Faure Bethmann 1928 - Fleurie Beaujolais 1943 - Richebourg Charles Noëllat 1974 - Vosne Romanée Réserve Reine Pédauque 1945 - Cave Jean Bourdy, Blanc vieux d'Arlay 1907 - Domaine du Pin 1ères Côtes de Bordeaux 1937

Group 2 : Champagne Léon Camuzet environ 15 ans - vin nature de champagne Saran, blanc de blancs Moët 1950 - Bourgogne Aligoté Barozzi 1950 - Montagny Barozzi 1949 - Meursault (?) 1953 - Tokay de Riquewihr 1966 (Dopff et Irion) - Riesling Kaefferkopf 1983 Jean-Baptiste Adam - Riesling Sélection de Grains Nobles Hugel 1976 - Clos Joliette 1974 Jurançon - Vin Jaune d'Arbois 1966 domaine de la Pinte - Cos d'Estournel 1966 - Château Pontet Canet 1964 - Château d'Arsac Margaux 1925 - Gevrey Chambertin J. Faiveley probable 1947 - Château Chalon Jean Bourdy 1928 - Coulée de Serrant Nicolas Joly 1983 - Barsac (?) 1937 - Rivesaltes ambré 1955 - Maury 1928

Group 3 : Champagne Léon Camuzet environ 15 ans - Champagne Deutz 1978 - Pouilly-Vinzelles 1956 de Cabet-Frères - Montrachet Bouchard 1988 - Château Bellefont Belcier (Saint Emilion) 1964 - Mouton Baron Philippe (d'Armaillac) 1959 - Château Haut-Brion 1925 - Bourgueil Sélection Vieilles Vignes 1989 du Domaine des Ouches - Cave Jean Bourdy, Côtes du Jura rouge 1945 - Hautes Côtes de Nuits J. et M. Gauthet 1969 - Volnay 1957 de De Moucheron - Beaune Champimonts 1er Cru Joseph Drouhin 1948 - Gevrey Chambertin Marius Meulien 1933 - Corton Clos du Roy L.A. Montoy 1929 - Montlouis Demi-sec 1983 de Fradin-Georges - Banyuls hors d'âge, Dom du Mas Blanc, Parcé, sostera - Rivesaltes ambré 1955 - Cognac trois quarts de siècle Tiffont # 1874.

The profile of each group was different, the choice that I made depending on several criteria that I tried to use to make it the more compatible with the wish of some people to sit together, with the will that people drink the wines that they brought, the will to equilibrate the levels according to the inputs. It must be said that the quality of the meeting depends on the quality of the wines that the people bring. When people are generous, we share great wines. This dinner was very generous.

The meal was very intelligent : grosses gambas de la Méditerranée à la plancha / volaille fermière des Landes rôtie, écrasé de pommes Charlotte à l’huile d’olive / sélections de fromages de Bernard Antony / les abricots Bergeron en tarte feuilletée à l’amande de Provence, éclats de pistache.

Everyone remarked that the menu was proper, that the service of the wines was proper, even if it can be better, when we will be used to work together.

I was in Group 1. Here are my comments. The champagne Gonet 1973 is obviously « advanced ». The bubbles exist but fragile, the colour is amber. So we enter in another world. When one accepts this situation, one begins to understand all the subtleties. This is a very expressive champagne, of a high subtlety, that I would see with truffles or foie gras. The vin nature de champagne Saran, blanc de blancs Moët 1950 is very similar. The bubble is very scarce, and it is very dark yellow. On our table, two members will find it absolutely delightful. Personally I preferred the Gonet, as the Moët had a small bitterness after the middle of the mouth.

The Bâtard Montrachet Chanson 1959 is a delicious wine. The yellow colour has still green aspects which is a sign of youth. The roundness gives a pleasure without any complication. I love it because it is mine (which is a very regular attitude of all the academicians), but it is really a great white of a great year. The Montrachet Bichot 1943 has a nice level for its age, and a brown colour. It shows a little its age, but one can feel what it could have been some years ago. Anyway, really agreeable to drink. One member gives me a glass of Montrachet Bouchard 1988. I recognise it without any hesitation as I know these Montrachet by heart. It is fantastic, but, for my pleasure, it does not diminish the interest of the Bichot 1943.

I see with horror that the wine that Jean Hugel had given to me for this occasion as he could not come by himself was served to Group 2, when I had planned to let it be tasted by Group 1. Very quickly I grabbed (with tact) the rest of the bottle and poured half a glass that I shared with the sympathetic woman with a killing lovely smile sitting next to me, an academician of the first days, and who attended some of my dinners. This Riesling Sélection de Grains Nobles Hugel 1976 is a fantastic wine. What a charm, what a complexity. I love the Rieslings of this year. The golden colour, the length, are impressive.

The Château Saint Georges, St Georges St Emilion 1961 is also one of my babies. It is extremely balanced and secure. One member of our group falls in love with this wine. The colour is extremely ruby, very young. The fill was in the neck. A very comfortable wine of a good year. The two following wines were more uneasy for me. The Château Taillefer Puisseguin Saint-Emilion 1966 and the Château La Louvière rouge 1967 show obviously a certain lack of structure. They are not very dense and intense, so age does not help them. Very drinkable, but with a too discrete message.

This helps the Chateau La Gaffelière 1949 to shine. This is something serious. The year 1949 helps this wine to show exactly how La Gaffelière can be at its top, as I had already checked with great years like 1929, 1928 and 1904. When you drink such a wine rounded by some decades, you wish you could drink it every day.

My admiration goes to Montrose 1934 whose message is exactly in the historical line of Montrose, and is certainly above many of the Montrose 1934 that I have already drunk. Very pure, archetypal, it shows how great the terroir of Montrose is.

I know quite well Gruaud Larose 1928, either the Faure-Bethmann or the Sarget. This one is a Faure-Bethmann, which is as supple as a 1928 can be. What is very curious is that I see every wine, up to now, performing exactly as the year should command. I find it unusual as wines always give surprises. This 1928 is a great wine. And it shows with evidence the interest of the Academy. Many people attending this event would never drink such a wine if it were not by such a meeting.

Suddenly, my heart beats, I move on my chair, I get thrilled. I meet a great wine. And I am even more excited when I know what it is : a Fleurie 1943. The nose is to die for, nose of a Burgundy Grand Cru more than of a Beaujolais. I love so much these surprises.

I have no memory of the Richebourg Charles Noëllat 1974, because, as I went from one table to the other, it is very probable that I was not poured with this one. But the Vosne Romanée Réserve Reine Pédauque 1945 counts twice ! This is a wine ! Completely Burgundy, with a fantastic nose, and all the seduction of Burgundy which touches my heart. I had asked one table to be able to taste one of my kids, the Gevrey Chambertin Marius Meulien 1933 which had pleased me so much by opening. The colour is unbelievable of youth. The nose is spectacular. And in mouth, it has the power of an aircraft carrier. I am so proud ! Because 1933 belongs to the obscure years, and this wine is perfect. Now, we have the contrary example of what I said before : this wine performs as never a 1933 should. I will rank it as first of my personal vote.

And the performance of weak years continues, as the friend who, by the previous meeting, had brought a delicious Figeac 1925 brings me a glass of Château d'Arsac Margaux 1925. It is lovely, with evocations of raspberries, red fruits. Very adorable testimony of a polite wine.

I expected a lot from the oldest wine of the dinner, the Blanc vieux d'Arlay Cave Jean Bourdy 1907. But a disagreeable taste of glycerol disturbs the tasting. We can imagine what it could be, but only imagine. Fortunately, someone brings me from another table a Château Chalon Jean Bourdy 1928 which is exactly as it should: brilliant. An immense long and endless wine.

One of my babies, which I had tried in one of my dinners, Domaine du Pin 1ères Côtes de Bordeaux 1937, creates a surprise for the entire table. Who would expect that a Premières Côtes de Bordeaux could perform at this level? Of course, 1937 is an immense year for Sauternes. But anyway, this appellation should never show that. It showed.

I had brought some other of my children that I did not taste : Gevrey-Chambertin Faiveley # 1947 and the Corton Clos du Roy 1929. If I had brought so many wines, it is because the registrations for the Academy were very late. I was afraid to have not enough members, so, to provocate registrations, I had added some wines. It seems that it helped as 50 was the number I wanted to reach.

I tasted a fantastic Côtes du Jura rouge Cave Jean Bourdy 1945 ten times better than the same that I had drunk some weeks ago by the fantastic tasting of 120 Jura wines. This wine is made to be drunk by a dinner, and when I drank it, it showed me how sophisticated this wine, so ignored, can be when it gets age.

I had said to a charming woman, one of my beloved academicians that the level of her Volnay Moucheron 1957 was particularly low. She came to my sit with a provocative face : “taste”. I tasted. It was good. She was proud of that.

One academician had brought something incredible : a Cognac trois quarts de siècle Tiffont # 1874, cognac which has been made by melting two barrels, one of 1854 and one of 1904, which, due to evaporation, gave only 120 bottles. The blend was made when Mr. Tiffont was 100 years old, in 1979. I have rarely tasted such a precise cognac, with an extremely elegant wood. A very remarkable cognac.

It is difficult to make a ranking of what I have drunk, but I love to do it, because no ranking will hurt any wine, as all the wines are different. I ranked so : first, Gevrey Chambertin Marius Meulien 1933. Second, Bâtard Montrachet Chanson 1959, third, Montrachet Bouchard 1988. Fourth, the Fleurie 1943. And I give a special mention to the cognac, the Riesling Hugel 1976, the Vosne Romanée 1945 and the Montrose 1934.

The generosity of the members has been great, which is a key factor. Some members have had access to wines that they would never dream to taste one day. I think that this session of the Academy has been a great success. The way it was planned and organised seems to please everyone. It’s time to decide to make a new session.
Old wines are younger than what is generally considered
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by François Audouze » Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:55 am

It is clear that it is very difficult to make comments on such a subject.
But I would be happy to know if it is of any interest to some of you.
Old wines are younger than what is generally considered
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Bill Buitenhuys » Wed Jun 14, 2006 7:55 am

You are right, it is difficult to comment, Francois. My mouth usually just hangs open in awe as I read through your notes. And to answer your question, yes, it is quite interesting. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and experiences.
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Robin Garr » Wed Jun 14, 2006 8:46 am

François Audouze wrote:It is clear that it is very difficult to make comments on such a subject.
But I would be happy to know if it is of any interest to some of you.


Very much interest indeed, François. As others have said, wines like these are so far outside everyday experience for most of us that we are often left in awe-struck silence, but that doesn't mean we are not interested. We love your reports on wines, old and new alike!
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Otto » Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:04 pm

Just a question about the Maury 1928: was it by any chance the one of Domaines et Terroirs du Sud which was rather recently bottled? I shared a bottle of that this past winter with two friends of mine - very nice stuff! I think I even posted a note somewhere, but couldn't find it, so here it is again:

Healthy, light brick colour. The nose was lovely and sweet without the slightest hint of heat. It was typical to Grenache with strawberry aromas mixed with a hint of warm dung, a little floral also. The palate was rather full bodied, but not as heavy as port, with fine structure, much sweetness and fine length. The aftertaste was quite lovely indeed, with fine acidity carrying the herb-laced fruit to great lengths. A bit of a disappointment for the price and for it not having much developed characters despite its age. It had a bit of earth, but I like lots of it. Lovely anyway.

And another question: do you have much experience with older Beaujolais? I once almost had an opportunity to taste a Moulin-à-Vent 1947 (label was so degraded the producer was illegible) but the careless owner dropped the bottle and it broke - I'm still devastated. I'd love to try some...

And do keep on posting here, please. You have many dedicated readers.
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by François Audouze » Wed Jun 14, 2006 7:46 pm

I have many Maury of the same origin as yours.
This one, drunk that day at the academy, was made by the vignerons of Maury.
They are very equivalent.

I have drunk some old Moulin à Vent. The Moulin à Vent 1947 was from Génard. An incredibly good wine, that I ranked in a dinner above Latour 1934 ! and above Beychevelle 1959 !!!
A Moulin à Vent 1928 was from Coron (the Burgundy winemaker and négociant)
A Moulin à Vent 1935 was from Chamson (very great)
A Moulin à Vent 1945 was from Thomas bassot
A Moulin à Vent 1955 was from Alfred Liboz

I think I have some which are still in my cellar. Some 47 and some 45.
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Manuel Camblor » Wed Jun 14, 2006 8:23 pm

François Audouze wrote:My admiration goes to Montrose 1934 whose message is exactly in the historical line of Montrose, and is certainly above many of the Montrose 1934 that I have already drunk. Very pure, archetypal, it shows how great the terroir of Montrose is.


I had the privilege of tasting '34 Montrose a few years back and must concur. A very vigorous wine with plenty of breed and great dirt. At the tasting I speak of, this seemed even tannic and quite young.

... (A)s supple as a 1928 can be.


François, you are the first person I've ever read talking about the '28s as "supple" wines. '28 was legendary for the brutal tannins of its wines and how impossible to predict their aging potential was (at least for good flks like André Simon. Alexis Lichine and a number of others...). Even of late I've sampled some '28s that are so powerful at this age they make me wonder as to exactly how mouth-cauterizingly undrinkable they were in their youth and how long they stayed that way.

But alas, I'll take your comment as relating to what the wines have become after almost eight decades. A Calon-Ségur I tasted a couple of months back was gorgeous, silky and evocative.

It's a beautiful life you live. A pleasure reading your report.
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Manuel Camblor » Wed Jun 14, 2006 8:28 pm

Otto Nieminen wrote:Just a question about the Maury 1928: was it by any chance the one of Domaines et Terroirs du Sud which was rather recently bottled? I shared a bottle of that this past winter with two friends of mine - very nice stuff! I think I even posted a note somewhere, but couldn't find it, so here it is again:



I had very much the same question as Otto. A couple of years ago, thanks to my good friend Nicos Neocleous and while visiting heim in London, U discovered a 1928 "Solera" Maury bottled by Les Vignerons de Maury, which would have seemed to me to be a coop. The wine had been recently bottled. Some time after that trip to London, Nicos came to New York and surprised me with some bottles of the wine, of which I still keep one. I last tasted it last year and it was beautiful.

Any chance this could have been what you tried, François? If not, then I guess I have more '28 Maury to look for. '28, in fact, seems to be the year for Maury these days... :D
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by François Audouze » Fri Jun 16, 2006 7:26 am

Manuel,
I agree on your comment concerning the year 1928 which was incredibly difficult for the first 30 years (I write that without being a witness of this fact). I have drunk wines of 1928 for the last 30 years, and it can be counted largely above 100 different wines.
What amazes me is the constant easiness of these wines which are so well built.
Unfortunately, yesterday, I had the other Gruaud Larose, the Sarget 1928, and it was dead. This was due to the cork.
I am a lover of 1928, a year of pure easy pleasure, easy meaning that you enjoy the wine without being obliged to intellectualise your pleasure.

Concerning the Maury, I am sure that all the content of the 1928's is not 100% 1928. But who cares : it is good, not expensive.
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Manuel Camblor » Fri Jun 16, 2006 8:15 am

François Audouze wrote:Manuel,
I agree on your comment concerning the year 1928 which was incredibly difficult for the first 30 years (I write that without being a witness of this fact). I have drunk wines of 1928 for the last 30 years, and it can be counted largely above 100 different wines.
What amazes me is the constant easiness of these wines which are so well built.
Unfortunately, yesterday, I had the other Gruaud Larose, the Sarget 1928, and it was dead. This was due to the cork.
I am a lover of 1928, a year of pure easy pleasure, easy meaning that you enjoy the wine without being obliged to intellectualise your pleasure.

Concerning the Maury, I am sure that all the content of the 1928's is not 100% 1928. But who cares : it is good, not expensive.


INdeed, François, if we speak of the last thirty years, then things change regarding 1928. And though I have had several '28s, my experience is nowhere near as extensive as yours. Still, I could see your point about the ease of drinking and the lack of a need to intellectualize the wines, given the right wine and the right context. Some wines, like the Calon I mentioned earlier, are indeed remarkably friendly, sensuous and perfumed. One wonders at the amount of itme they took to become this way, but only for a moment. Then one takes another sip and just purrs like a cat...

I can think of perhaps one '28 Bordeaux that is an exception to that non-cerebral rule. While still an incredibly plush and immediately gratifying wine, ;28 Ausone is also a wine of depth and intellectual stimulation, Granted, that intellectual stimulation tends to veer toward poetry rather than philosophy rather quickly, but hey...

My curiosity about the '28 Maury is regarding the producer. The bottle I have is of a "Maury 1928 Solera" by "Les Vignerons de Maury", in a stylized, thoroughly "now" bottle with a circular café-au-lait colored label. Doing a quick Google search I found this site under the producer's name:
http://www.vigneronsdemaury.com/. The wine I mention doesn't appear in it, as far as I can tell.

What's interesting is that other wines may be available from that year (vintage or solera), since the one I have is quite, quite nice (I remember bringing a bottle as an epilogue to a Vega Siciia-themed dinner and it was a very worthy capping off to a mighty evening; held its own very nobly, the little Maury...). I'd love to have a rster of producers to draw from.

And do you know what the vintages of Maury are that one should look out for?
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by James Roscoe » Fri Jun 16, 2006 10:13 am

Where is Nicos these days? I always enjoyed his posts?
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Manuel Camblor » Fri Jun 16, 2006 10:16 am

James Roscoe wrote:Where is Nicos these days? I always enjoyed his posts?


Good question. I'll e-mail him and find out. I think the last I heard from him he had a question about Colombian pop singer Juanes... Not the type of music I relate to, so I passed him on to the Latina entertainment journalist in our family... Alas, I surmised Nicos was doing okay. Just not so much up on the boards anymore. Chances are he hasn't caught on to this little joint yet.
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Otto » Fri Jun 16, 2006 2:17 pm

James Roscoe wrote:Where is Nicos these days? I always enjoyed his posts?


I didn't know he wrote here as well - I've only seen him on the UK Wine Forum and eBob. Agree: 't would be nice to have him (and his blondes) here as well!
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by Manuel Camblor » Fri Jun 16, 2006 2:54 pm

Otto Nieminen wrote:
James Roscoe wrote:Where is Nicos these days? I always enjoyed his posts?


I didn't know he wrote here as well - I've only seen him on the UK Wine Forum and eBob. Agree: 't would be nice to have him (and his blondes) here as well!


I tried to lure him through e-mail. For some mysterious reason he seems to prefer that horribel Squires place ot this fine forum. Go figure...
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Re: WTN: 50 fantastic wines from 1988 up to 1907...

by François Audouze » Wed Jun 21, 2006 3:40 am

I agree with you on the specificity of Ausone.
Ausone is a magic wine. I have a great love for Ausone, and my best ever has been 1919.
Recently I have drunk a 1949 with Alain Vauthier, which was nice, and a 1959 by my home which was fantastic.

For Maury, every old year will be great. There is not the same importance of vintages for Maury.
I have some bottles of a Maury 1880 which are purely extraordinary.
Old wines are younger than what is generally considered

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