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TomHill

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NYTimes: Alice on American Vermouth

by TomHill » Wed Feb 13, 2013 1:58 pm

Interesting article in today's NYTimes:
NYTimes:AmericanVermouth

by SweetAlice. I started reading this w/ some interest and then glanced up at the author, assuming it was Asimov, and noted it was AliceFiering, whose unrelenting polemics strike Fier into the hearts of industrial winemakers. Actually a well-written article w/o her usual preachy/whiney/kvetchy tone. Amazing.
DanPetroski/Massican released his first Vermouth, made from TocaiFriulano wine, last Fall that is quite good. Alice must have missed that one.
Tom
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Brian K Miller

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Re: NYTimes: Alice on American Vermouth

by Brian K Miller » Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:44 pm

I've had the Carl Sutton version (urban bicycling is awesome) and found it delicious, both neat and with aromatic herbs over ice!
...(Humans) are unique in our capacity to construct realities at utter odds with reality. Dogs dream and dolphins imagine, but only humans are deluded. –Jacob Bacharach
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Rahsaan

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Re: NYTimes: Alice on American Vermouth

by Rahsaan » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:58 pm

A good development, of course.

A few months ago I bought some Atsby Armadillo Cake and found it quite delicious, although it didn't really thrill me on its own.
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Hoke

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Re: NYTimes: Alice on American Vermouth

by Hoke » Fri Feb 15, 2013 2:20 pm

Okay article. Nice to showcase vermouths as a category. Necessary.

I'd add in the Ransom American Dry Vermouth (made by the same farmer that makes the Ransom Old Tom Gin---which is not a real Old Tom but really a barrel-aged gin that is pretty damned good; he also makes a light-aged young Whippersnapper Whiskey). The Ransom is pungent and full-flavored, and list all the botanicals clearly on the front label. It also makes some kick-ass cocktails,though a little goes a long way.

Imbue has also come out with a very successful and well received line addition: the Imbue Petal and Thorn, a sorta-kinda vermouth rose'. Very flavorful, and as one would suspect, well in the floral zone. Great aperitif; great mixer.

I personally believe there is a tremendous opportunity for the "aromatized wines" category---it's loosely defined and thus perfect for the American "anything goes" approach; easy to make as it requires a standard base wine widely available and inexpensive; and is determined by the style (taste preferences) of the person making the concoction, rather than getting TomHill all worked up over whether it has the proper terroir or varietal typicity. 8) Appeals to the craft person in all of us and isn't that difficult to make.

All that would be required would be a wholesale change in American drinking habits, so there'd be someone to buy an consume the stuff. :twisted:
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Awwwww...

by TomHill » Fri Feb 15, 2013 3:20 pm

Hoke wrote:I'd add in the Ransom American Dry Vermouth (made by the same farmer that makes the Ransom Old Tom Gin---which is not a real Old Tom but really a barrel-aged gin that is pretty damned good; he also makes a light-aged young Whippersnapper Whiskey). The Ransom is pungent and full-flavored, and list all the botanicals clearly on the front label. It also makes some kick-ass cocktails,though a little goes a long way.

Awwwwww. Hoke....you never pass up a chance to get in a dig about my age, do you?? :-)

I personally believe there is a tremendous opportunity for the "aromatized wines" category---it's loosely defined and thus perfect for the American "anything goes" approach; easy to make as it requires a standard base wine widely available and inexpensive; and is determined by the style (taste preferences) of the person making the concoction, rather than getting TomHill all worked up over whether it has the proper terroir or varietal typicity. 8) Appeals to the craft person in all of us and isn't that difficult to make.


Totally agree. There are two genres that I feel are sadly neglected in Calif...passito/dessert wines and "aromatized" wines. The market for the first is there. For the second,
it needs to be developed. Most people regard "vermouth" as a spirt, to be used in mixed/high octane drinks. But they can be very nice, on their own. I'd love to see
some try a Chinato in Calif. Wouldn't sell at all...but I'd like to try one.
Tom
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Re: NYTimes: Alice on American Vermouth

by Hoke » Fri Feb 15, 2013 4:22 pm

Tom, the approach I'd use (if an organixation of aromatizzato producers were to hire me) would focus on popularizing and promoting the concept of the Americano aperitif. That would give you the ability to make an entire range of low-alcohol, refreshing, taste-intensive cocktails (but based on wine) and engage a very wide ranging audience. Be perfect for the 'cocktail chardonnay' crowd as well, which sees indiscriminate wines as aperitifs.

But then, no body is paying me, so I'll just champion these things on my own. 8) One drink at a time.
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Brian K Miller

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Re: Awwwww...

by Brian K Miller » Tue Feb 19, 2013 2:35 pm

TomHill wrote:
Totally agree. There are two genres that I feel are sadly neglected in Calif...passito/dessert wines and "aromatized" wines. The market for the first is there. For the second,
it needs to be developed. Most people regard "vermouth" as a spirt, to be used in mixed/high octane drinks. But they can be very nice, on their own. I'd love to see
some try a Chinato in Calif. Wouldn't sell at all...but I'd like to try one.
Tom


Sutton Cellars also makes an aromatized wine based on green walnuts, herbs, and organic Carrignan. Never thought I would buy a "flavored" wine, but it was uniquely delicious.
...(Humans) are unique in our capacity to construct realities at utter odds with reality. Dogs dream and dolphins imagine, but only humans are deluded. –Jacob Bacharach

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