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For the love of leeks

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For the love of leeks

by Karen/NoCA » Fri Sep 23, 2022 11:35 am

I love leeks and use them in soups, pasta, charred, all good. Since I usually cut off the dark green leaves with one cut, I found this information note worthy.
No waste leek prep: To trim leeks to get the greatest yield of the tender light green and white parts, don't trim off all of the dark green leaves on one slice. Instead, use a paring knife to cut away each leaf individually; as you remove only the dark green part, more light green is exposed from underneath on the next leaf. Trimming the leaves in layers will give you a much greater usable amount of leek. Save the dark green parts to flavor broth, soup,, stock , or stew. This is something I have never done, but want to try it.
I especially love leek and potato soup, but recently cut them in half and charred them on the grill pan. Just salt and pepper and a little butter. One can also cut the white and light green parts into match sticks and fry in oil until golden brown. Use them to add extra flavor sprinkled over salads, soups, dips. Or to add crunch to burgers. omelets, pastas.
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Re: For the love of leeks

by Jenise » Fri Sep 23, 2022 12:41 pm

That is exactly how I trim leeks, though I use scissors. The green parts end up Xmas tree shaped. I love the pale green color and have never felt right about cutting off all but the white which many old recipes will instruct one to do.

I love them in salads! In Spain they cook them in water until very softened--I don't take it that far but I do put them, halved and cut in lengths, in a skillet with a bit of water to steam up into the layers. I've also done that cutting flat rounds though of course you have to be careful about removing enough outer leaves to remove silt.

A favorite thing? "Melted" leeks. Super-thinly sliced from halves and sauteed until just barely soft. Still very sweet, then I add salt, white pepper, flour and cream to thicken into a mousse of sorts. Fabulous with salmon or lightly poached fish.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Jeff Grossman

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Re: For the love of leeks

by Jeff Grossman » Fri Sep 23, 2022 1:26 pm

Ooh, yer killin' me here. I like leeks in all these ways but they fall under Pumpkin's onion ban so none for me.
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Bill Spohn

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Re: For the love of leeks

by Bill Spohn » Fri Sep 23, 2022 2:14 pm

Leeks are the least 'oniony' of the allium family, and really might not be guessed as being in that family (depending on preparation) if the taster didn't know.

I love a really good vichyssoise (named for the French town long before it became a centre for Nazi collaborators) and the version that uses leeks is not oniony at all. I like to serve a small bit of chilled soup as a focus for attention and palate cleanser at the beginning of a long dinner, usually in small cylindrical glasses or in demitasse tea cups (of which I have many by inheritance from ancestors who for some reason collected same).

I bet if you made it with leeks and said nothing he would mistake it for a non-onion version (of which there are many, using substitute zucchini, fennel, asparagus, watercress, green pea, cucumber, sorrel and probably a handful I've forgotten).
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Re: For the love of leeks

by Jeff Grossman » Fri Sep 23, 2022 2:48 pm

Ahem. Why are you suggesting making dishes with leeks that don't taste like leeks?
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Re: For the love of leeks

by Jenise » Fri Sep 23, 2022 5:08 pm

Leeks still taste like leeks. Bill's right that there's a possibility they'd slide under the radar when blended with potatoes and butter. But on the other hand, I who hated eggs and still hate Vodka have for decades been plied with foods and drinks that contain both. When I expressed my objection to ____, invariably the reaction has been "yes, it's in there, but you can't taste it." WRONG. I could and did every time, but for some reason people who like those flavors don't think they're obvious. Well, usually, to someone who hates it? It is.

I've had both success and failures with very good friends who are also onion haters. The merest hint of grated onion in a potato and cheese gratin was immediately detected, and I didn't think it would be. However, a beefy French onion pureed with coffee and cream was a surprising success. It's not always predictable.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: For the love of leeks

by Jeff Grossman » Fri Sep 23, 2022 9:04 pm

Jenise wrote:Leeks still taste like leeks. Bill's right that there's a possibility they'd slide under the radar when blended with potatoes and butter. But on the other hand, I who hated eggs and still hate Vodka have for decades been plied with foods and drinks that contain both. When I expressed my objection to ____, invariably the reaction has been "yes, it's in there, but you can't taste it." WRONG. I could and did every time, but for some reason people who like those flavors don't think they're obvious. Well, usually, to someone who hates it? It is.

Right.

I've had both success and failures with very good friends who are also onion haters. The merest hint of grated onion in a potato and cheese gratin was immediately detected, and I didn't think it would be. However, a beefy French onion pureed with coffee and cream was a surprising success. It's not always predictable.

Yes, His Squashy Majesty likes French onion soup, of all things.
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Re: For the love of leeks

by Karen/NoCA » Sat Sep 24, 2022 8:58 am

When young, my hubby and I had another couple we liked to hang out with. When I found out the he of the couple hated onions I enlightened him that he has eaten onions many times at our home in casseroles, stews, chilies. We never saw them again. Later I heard they had divorced and each had moved out of Redding to go their own way. Weird!










found ou
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Re: For the love of leeks

by Jeff Grossman » Sun Sep 25, 2022 3:11 am

Look what you did with all those onions! :mrgreen:

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