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Shishito Peppers

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Christina Georgina

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Shishito Peppers

by Christina Georgina » Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:46 pm

A perfect substitute for Pimienton di Padron and even better, they grow in Wisconsin :D
Quite prolific so I'm enjoying, often, the seared peppers with an Andalusian almond sauce. Their very distinctive, green pepper flavor adds a new depth to many dishes.
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Rahsaan » Thu Sep 05, 2013 9:55 pm

How funny. We've been enjoying them a lot recently. Just tonight in fact. Although tonight my wife was complaining that they got too 'burnt', so I'll have to make hers closer to raw next time! :wink:
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Hoke » Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:23 pm

We're lucky here, what with all the little local small farmers doing all sorts of things---so we get fresh produce, literally from the city outskirts here in the fecund Columbia-Willamette Valleys. Just now going through a run of some absolutely gorgeous peppers, especially padrons. Shisitos are all over as well. We sort of like the "Russian Roulette" of the padrons, getting one in about every ten that will scorch your mouth, but never knowing which one it will be. :D

And they are fantastic with good sherry, both Fino and Manzanilla. Even a good Amontillado.
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Thomas » Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:37 pm

Hoke wrote:We're lucky here, what with all the little local small farmers doing all sorts of things---so we get fresh produce, literally from the city outskirts here in the fecund Columbia-Willamette Valleys. Just now going through a run of some absolutely gorgeous peppers, especially padrons. Shisitos are all over as well. We sort of like the "Russian Roulette" of the padrons, getting one in about every ten that will scorch your mouth, but never knowing which one it will be. :D

And they are fantastic with good sherry, both Fino and Manzanilla. Even a good Amontillado.


My experience with hot pepper Russian roulette is that it happens when you grow hot peppers too close to regular peppers and they cross pollinate. Is the padron supposed to be like that?
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Hoke » Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:34 pm

Thomas wrote:
Hoke wrote:We're lucky here, what with all the little local small farmers doing all sorts of things---so we get fresh produce, literally from the city outskirts here in the fecund Columbia-Willamette Valleys. Just now going through a run of some absolutely gorgeous peppers, especially padrons. Shisitos are all over as well. We sort of like the "Russian Roulette" of the padrons, getting one in about every ten that will scorch your mouth, but never knowing which one it will be. :D

And they are fantastic with good sherry, both Fino and Manzanilla. Even a good Amontillado.


My experience with hot pepper Russian roulette is that it happens when you grow hot peppers too close to regular peppers and they cross pollinate. Is the padron supposed to be like that?


Not sure, Thomas. I think it's simply the nature of the padron. Everywhere I've had them the same frequency tends to apply---Spain, California, Oregon.

I can certainly see where proximity between hot and normally mild peppers would cause some mixing, but don't know if it is specific or applicable in this case.
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Mike Filigenzi » Fri Sep 06, 2013 9:53 am

We asked a grower at our farmers' market if she knew why some padrons are hot while most were mild. She couldn't come up with any rhyme or reason. Seems like that's just the nature of the peppers.
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Thomas » Fri Sep 06, 2013 10:02 am

Mike Filigenzi wrote:We asked a grower at our farmers' market if she knew why some padrons are hot while most were mild. She couldn't come up with any rhyme or reason. Seems like that's just the nature of the peppers.


I found this mini explanation at Wikipedia, the source of all life's information!: the peppers grown towards August/September tend to contain more capsaicin than the ones of June/July.
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Mike Filigenzi » Fri Sep 06, 2013 10:34 am

Thomas wrote:
Mike Filigenzi wrote:We asked a grower at our farmers' market if she knew why some padrons are hot while most were mild. She couldn't come up with any rhyme or reason. Seems like that's just the nature of the peppers.


I found this mini explanation at Wikipedia, the source of all life's information!: the peppers grown towards August/September tend to contain more capsaicin than the ones of June/July.


Interesting! We had some a couple of weeks ago at a friend's house. They were done in typical fashion - sauteed up in a little oil with some salt. We seemed to have a higher percentage of hot ones than usual. I'll have to get some now and see if they're even hotter.
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Re: Shishito Peppers

by Thomas » Fri Sep 06, 2013 10:43 am

Mike Filigenzi wrote:
Thomas wrote:
Mike Filigenzi wrote:We asked a grower at our farmers' market if she knew why some padrons are hot while most were mild. She couldn't come up with any rhyme or reason. Seems like that's just the nature of the peppers.


I found this mini explanation at Wikipedia, the source of all life's information!: the peppers grown towards August/September tend to contain more capsaicin than the ones of June/July.


Interesting! We had some a couple of weeks ago at a friend's house. They were done in typical fashion - sauteed up in a little oil with some salt. We seemed to have a higher percentage of hot ones than usual. I'll have to get some now and see if they're even hotter.


I haven't grown padrones but now that I know this little factoid about them, it's a challenge that I will take up next year--in two plantings. The problem here is that the ones I plant for August may never get to mature, as we have shorter summer weather here.

For instance, last night we went down to 40 F, with daytime temps in the 70s. That's the Finger Lakes: 30 degree swings every 24 hours!

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