Everything about food, from matching food and wine to recipes, techniques and trends.

Champagne pizza dough--crispier, fluffier

Moderators: Jenise, Robin Garr, David M. Bueker

no avatar
User

Jenise

Rank

FLDG Dishwasher

Posts

43048

Joined

Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:45 pm

Location

The Pacific Northest Westest

Champagne pizza dough--crispier, fluffier

by Jenise » Sun Feb 18, 2024 8:36 pm

Make a crispier, fluffier pizza pie by adding Champagne, seltzer, or any other sparkling wine to your dough.

By Oset Babür-Winter
Location: New York City

From an article in Food & Wine:

As someone who’s enjoyed her fair share of cozy winter pizza nights at home, I can personally attest to the fact that preparing the dough is no small feat. Our favorite classic pizza dough recipe requires patience, counter space, and careful measuring, all of which are part of creating the pie I recently tried at Serafina, New York City’s yellow-awninged Italian mainstay. Flour and yeast aside, the pizza also has one other key ingredient: Champagne.

I won’t say I’m jaded by restaurant specials that use unconventional ingredients (think: the Dirty Pasta Water Martini), but I certainly approach them with a noticeable degree of skepticism. Is it a publicity stunt for Instagram or TikTok? Is it going to just taste … weird? Will people judge me for trying it?

When I learned that Serafina was adding two entire 750ml bottles of Veuve Clicquot Brut Champagne to every batch of dough (yielding roughly 30 pizzas), I mainly expected to feel the difference in my wallet, because nothing says upcharge like Champagne pizza dough. Instead, I bit into an incredibly airy, cracker-like crust that played nicely with the cheesy decadence of Serafina’s Cacio e Pepe pie, created specifically to complement the dough. If you love the brioche and yeasty flavor of a good bottle of Champagne, you’ll adore (and actually notice) the slight, almost floral sweetness of this crust.

The process is fairly simple: To make the pizza, Champagne is added in place of water and is combined with the flour and other ingredients at the beginning of the dough-making process.

25 Pizza Recipes to Perfect
“One of the primary goals when making dough is to leaven the bread with thousands upon thousands of tiny air bubbles, which expand during proofing and baking to create a light, tender crumb. The main way of doing this is how breads have been made for millennia: with yeast,” says Daniel Gritzer, senior culinary director of Serious Eats. Gritzer notes that there are other ways to create or enhance the bubble structure of a batter or dough, including chemical leavenings like baking soda and physical ones like carbonated liquids. “Adding a sparkling wine like Champagne is one fairly expensive way to do that, and I have a lot of doubts about how much difference it would make in flavor and texture compared to simply making a quality dough using well-established bread-making techniques to make the most of flour, water, yeast, salt, and time.”

If you want to experiment with carbonated liquids in a dough, Gritzer suggests opting for the cheapest sparkling wine or even beer you can find, or plain old seltzer (though we recognize the pizzaz points associated with using Veuve). As to whether the resulting pizza dough will have alcohol, the answer is probably not. “Alcohol vaporizes at lower temperatures than water, so much of the alcohol that is naturally produced by yeast during fermentation cooks off during baking.”

Vittorio Assaf and Fabio Granato, founders of the Serafina group, said that their pizza chefs made multiple Champagne pizzas before landing on the perfect combination, playing around with both the amount of Champagne as well as the toppings on the complementary pie. The team also considered (and remains open to) using other sparkling wines like Prosecco or Cava and are curious to see how other bubbly might impact the pie’s texture and taste.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
no avatar
User

Barb Downunder

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1106

Joined

Wed Mar 18, 2009 6:31 am

Re: Champagne pizza dough--crispier, fluffier

by Barb Downunder » Mon Feb 19, 2024 2:27 am

Even in my madder moments I am unlikely to throw good French champagne into pizza dough. However, I could be tempted to try this with a less expensive option. My local bottle shop sells 200 mil bottles of DeBortoli Prosecco which isn’t too bad a drop for when I just want a glass of bubbles, so that might be worth trying net time I get the urge to make pizza.
no avatar
User

Larry Greenly

Rank

Resident Chile Head

Posts

6814

Joined

Sun Mar 26, 2006 11:37 am

Location

Albuquerque, NM

Re: Champagne pizza dough--crispier, fluffier

by Larry Greenly » Tue Feb 20, 2024 6:35 pm

I would imagine a light beer would work and be a lot cheaper.
no avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1232

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 1:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: Champagne pizza dough--crispier, fluffier

by wnissen » Fri Feb 23, 2024 1:20 pm

Hm, Champagne probably has a lot more CO2 than beer or soda, so I can see it having an effect. I agree it's hard to imagine there being a difference between Champagne, Champagne method, and generic sparkling wine.

I certainly don't object to the waste, we used a cup (1/3 bottle) of grand cru Swiss wine in our Valentine's Day fondue. Not sure it's "worth it", but it does taste great!
Walter Nissen

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Amazon and 0 guests

Powered by phpBB ® | phpBB3 Style by KomiDesign