The place for all things wine, focused on serious wine discussions.
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sun Oct 13, 2013 2:05 am

Bob Parsons Alberta wrote:Good answer above Walt, don`t get me started on those Paralysers!!

A Paralyzer sounds a bit on the nose for a cocktail!

Hoke wrote:Moscow Mules---that cocktail has made a resounding comeback in bartender/mixology circles, so it's au courant again. It's still best in the "traditional" copper cup (because it emphasizes the coldness and gingery zinginess of the cocktail. Plus bartenders can add that fresh ginger zing all they want, and enhance it in other ways. It's also a good drink for clubbing because, a a la highball, there's usually way more non-alcoholic in ratio to alcoholic. Plus, the younger drinkers love it.

I've not see it while out and about, but I also tend to ignore vodka drinks. I'm always on the lookout for good non-alcoholic drinks, so I will try a virgin version, and I'm also curious to try rum or tequila; it seems like a flexible base to start from. No dedicated glasses, though; we're with Alton Brown that only one unitasker is permitted per kitchen.

Hoke wrote:1. Use good Irish Whiskey (which you did, Cooley makes a nice pot still style of Irish, in comparison to the Bushmills, which makes malt scotch. The Pot Still style works better with Irish Coffee than the Malt Style, imo.

2. As Imbibe says, use brown sugar. I don't make simple syrup; I just use the sugar, as brown sugar is easy to mix in hot coffee.

3. No instant! French or Italian, or even Viennese, roast grade from a top roaster, either drip or French Press, made fresh to order.

4. None of that canned whipped cream. Hand whipped, fresh and not to the stiff point, then slid slowly over the back of a spoon on top of the coffee/sugar mix. Part of the joy of a great IC is sipping 'through' the sweet soft cream, then getting hit full force with the intensified whiskiness of the booze, then hit with the soft richness of the brown sugar.

5. Rule: If anyone, ever, serves you an "Irish Coffee" that looks like a latte, refuse it. That's just a latte with some whiskey in it,which is fine, but it's not Irish Coffee.

That experience of sipping through the cream was exactly what I liked about the drink. Such a contrast of flavor, temperature, and texture. I will confess that I have not hand-whipped cream since college, when I was invited to a Seder in Los Angeles and the hostess's mixer was on the fritz. Since then it is strictly Kitchen Aid. Still, I would make this for company, as you suggest. It's not difficult to make one, and making a dozen would be scarcely more trouble.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:27 am

Day 16: "Sidecar" - Finally got some Cointreau, my nemesis, so we're going back in time to the 1910s (according to Imbibe). I used 2 oz. VSOP cognac, as specified, even though I don't especially care for grape brandies, being more of a Calvados guy myself. It's combined with 1 oz. Cointreau, the juice of a small lemon, and shaken.

IMGP0469.jpg
(73.68 KiB) Downloaded 2109 times
IMGP0472.jpg
(53.97 KiB) Downloaded 2109 times


How was it? Well, the Sidecar, or as I call it, "Millionaire Lemonade," is a very strong drink, alcoholically, that doesn't come across that way due to the sweetness of the Cointreau and the zest (pun sadly intended) of the lemon. It tastes good, don't get me wrong, but it's too easy to drink. I might like it better as a long drink, more along the lines of a lemonade. Due to the taste changes of dilution, it would taste significantly drier.

Official recipe: http://www.imbibemagazine.com/Sidecar-Recipe
Last edited by wnissen on Thu Oct 31, 2013 2:06 am, edited 2 times in total.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

Hoke

Rank

Achieving Wine Immortality

Posts

10565

Joined

Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am

Location

Portland, OR

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Hoke » Sun Oct 13, 2013 1:18 pm

Love a good Sidecar (as long as they don't put those silly sugar rims on the glass). Looks like you made your Sidecar right!

Very versatile drink too. As in, sub the cognac for a nice dark aged rum for a Tropical Sidecar. Yum. And also easy to drink.

Or stick with the cognac and add a splash of Benedictine. Or Chartreuse. Or Canton Ginger. Lot's of ways to go here.

Suddenly I have an urge to head for the spirit cabinet.
no avatar
User

JC (NC)

Rank

Lifelong Learner

Posts

6105

Joined

Mon Mar 27, 2006 1:23 pm

Location

Fayetteville, NC

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by JC (NC) » Sun Oct 13, 2013 5:48 pm

Hoke, after seeing the photo and reading your suggestions, suddenly I too have an urge to head to the spirits cabinet (and I don't even have a spirits cabinet. What I have is one box with Appleton Rum and a few other hard liquor bottles.)
no avatar
User

JC (NC)

Rank

Lifelong Learner

Posts

6105

Joined

Mon Mar 27, 2006 1:23 pm

Location

Fayetteville, NC

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by JC (NC) » Sun Oct 13, 2013 6:09 pm

On the Irish Coffee--listen to Hoke. I love a good Irish coffee but would never consider instant coffee or canned whipped cream. I remember meeting up with a second cousin once removed or something like that who came to Lincoln, NE from Virginia to teach architecture at the University of Nebraska. (Originally my father's ancestors came from Winchester, VA to Nebraska to homestead.) Along with one of her professorial colleagues who was from Ireland, we went to a cocktail lounge in downtown Lincoln and ordered Irish coffees. They were not up to the standard of the Irish professor so he spent the rest of the evening teaching the staff how to make a true Irish coffee.
User avatar
User

Victorwine

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1675

Joined

Thu May 18, 2006 10:51 pm

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Victorwine » Sun Oct 13, 2013 6:39 pm

Hi Walt,
Great stuff Walt! Getting me thirsty for a cocktail! Couple of notes on the Harvey Wallbanger. It is now known as a Golden Frog. Galliano I believe did originate in Italy (today I believe it is distilled by Dutch distillery). Better alternative (and much more expensive) is a liquor known as Strega (definitely Italy- Benevento). Lot’s of things to do with these with these yellow liquors (especially in my household). We use them in our espresso (demi) and cappuccino (Italian version of Irish Coffee).

Salute
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:10 pm

JC (NC) wrote:Along with one of her professorial colleagues who was from Ireland, we went to a cocktail lounge in downtown Lincoln and ordered Irish coffees. They were not up to the standard of the Irish professor so he spent the rest of the evening teaching the staff how to make a true Irish coffee.

I'm still having trouble with the fact that the Irish Coffee is not only Irish in origin, but a drink that Irish people like. That happens so rarely: French fries aren't French, India Pale Ale isn't from India, and I've never seen a Russian who had anything but scorn for a White Russian. It even happens to America; would any American recognize a reduction of white wine, tomato sauce, and butter as "sauce américaine"? Nice to know that at least something kept the truth of its origins.

Victorwine wrote:Great stuff Walt! Getting me thirsty for a cocktail! Couple of notes on the Harvey Wallbanger. It is now known as a Golden Frog. Galliano I believe did originate in Italy (today I believe it is distilled by Dutch distillery). Better alternative (and much more expensive) is a liquor known as Strega (definitely Italy- Benevento). Lot’s of things to do with these with these yellow liquors (especially in my household). We use them in our espresso (demi) and cappuccino (Italian version of Irish Coffee).

Thanks, Victor, glad you are enjoying this thread. Wikipedia has a bit about Galliano, I see you are right that it originally came from Italy even though it's now made in the Netherlands.

I've heard of Strega but never seen it. Do you mix the Strega into the coffee and drink, or is there more to it?
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

Victorwine

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1675

Joined

Thu May 18, 2006 10:51 pm

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Victorwine » Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:39 pm

Yup Walt, its that simple, we use the liquor as a sweetener. For the demitasse we might only use ½ shot, for the cappuccino (which gets served in a larger cup) maybe 1 to 2 shots.

Salute
User avatar
User

Hoke

Rank

Achieving Wine Immortality

Posts

10565

Joined

Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am

Location

Portland, OR

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Hoke » Mon Oct 14, 2013 1:23 am

Strega isn't easy to find, but I agree with Victor: it sure is tasty.

Local bartender here made up a fairly simple drink called a Strega Sour and won a national contest with it, along with being cited as one of the best cocktails of the year (last year). It's enormously popular in his bar, which is something of a burden, since it's a cocktail that requires a dry shake and a wet shake (dry shake because of egg white foam having to be done separately.)

Lovely, lovely cocktail.
no avatar
User

Jay Mazzoni

Rank

Wine geek

Posts

20

Joined

Wed Jun 21, 2006 7:37 pm

Location

Louisville, KY

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Jay Mazzoni » Mon Oct 14, 2013 10:19 pm

Thought of this thread last night while in the Sazerac Bar at the New Orleans Roosevelt Hotel and waiting for a show across the street. Their "Classic Cocktails" list:
Attachments
image.jpg
Sazerac list
(62.89 KiB) Downloaded 2068 times
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:37 am

Took the opportunity yesterday to try the Singapore Sling, once more, with Heering. And wow, what a difference that made! The herbality of the Cherry Heering really brought out the character of the drink, even though the Kirchswasser I used was decent stuff.

IMGP0475.jpg
(81.57 KiB) Downloaded 2061 times


Day 17: "Margarita" - Is there a drink that has been debased more by poor ingredients? Lime juice is the lifeblood of the Margarita, yet any almost chain restaurant will use generic sour mix. Quite an irony that the "skinny" margarita is in a lot of ways closer to the real thing. The real thing, in my book, uses young (or at least youngish) 100% agave tequila. Definitely nothing with caramel color in it. Cuervo Tradicional isn't my favorite, but it's well distributed and despite the slight aging still has vigorous agave aromas. When I started thinking of tequila less as weird tasting whiskey and more as an agave eau de vie, things got a lot clearer, for me at least. You may notice I also have a Mezcal on deck, which I think is a worthy variant. You can even make a full-on "Margarita Maya" by replacing the Cointreau with Xtabentún, a Mayan anise-scented honey liqueur, but I'm sticking to the basics tonight.

Cocktail history is notoriously unreliable (depending as it does on the alcohol-impaired recollections of bartenders), but it's especially noticeable with the Margarita. Wikipedia says 1938 as the earliest date, while Imbibe, who probably has access to much better sources, says 1920s. Anyway, the recipe of a couple ounces tequila, an ounce of Cointreau or triple sec, and about an ounce of lime juice is pretty standard, but I've always found it severely lacking in lime. I'd rather add a bit of simple syrup, a lot more lime, and cut back a bit on the tequila and triple sec.

I also like flake salt instead of kosher for the rim. The flakes are big enough to make a real impact. While a garnish isn't traditional, I like, for practical reasons, a big slice of lime.
IMGP0483.jpg
(128.74 KiB) Downloaded 2061 times

IMGP0488.jpg
(96.44 KiB) Downloaded 2061 times
Last edited by wnissen on Thu Oct 31, 2013 2:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:59 pm

Jay Mazzoni wrote:Thought of this thread last night while in the Sazerac Bar at the New Orleans Roosevelt Hotel and waiting for a show across the street. Their "Classic Cocktails" list:

All those seem like classics to me. I remember having my first Sazerac at Commander's Palace, and it was eye-opening. I didn't much care for anise at that time, but the hint of it from the herbsaint combined with the rye was spectacular.

The only reason it (and the Ramos fizz) aren't included is because they are more than 100 years old.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:57 am

Day 18: "Kangaroo" - I'm back! Those of you who really know your cocktails may recognize the name of this drink, but I did not know there was a name for a vodka martini! Imbibe's Paul Clarke dates it c.1950, which means that people have been abusing the name of the martini since the 50s. I bet they never expected to see it evolve to the point where one could list a "Chocolatini" on a drink menu with a straight face.

Anyway, the drink itself is simple as can be, 2:1 vodka to dry vermouth, so, against my better judgement, I made one. The vodka I used is bottled by Soyuzplodoimport, which is a Russian governmental company and not to be confused with Soyuzplodimport (note one fewer 'o') that is the company that produces Stoli. I wish I was making this up. Anyway, it's a clean, dry, Russian style vodka, without the sweetness you find in, say, Grey Goose. The resulting cocktail is really boring. It's drinkable enough, and I used fresh Noilly Prat, which helped. The Kangaroo reminds me of the time I was at a wedding and my friend came back with a vodka tonic for me because they were out of gin. I couldn't really be mad because I had been personally responsible for putting together the wine and spirits to serve at the wedding, but I was still sad not to be drinking gin.
Last edited by wnissen on Thu Oct 31, 2013 2:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

James Dietz

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1248

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 7:45 pm

Location

Orange County, California

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by James Dietz » Sat Oct 26, 2013 1:57 pm

Jenise wrote:
wnissen wrote:Day 6: "Long Island Iced Tea" - Influential? Really? It certainly influenced bartenders everywhere to hate whoever ordered it. This version contains an ounce each of gin, light rum, vodka, blanco tequila, and triple sec, so it's a pain to make and contains something like 3 shots worth of alcohol. Despite this, due to the simple syrup and cola, it's fairly drinkable, if sweet. I can picture someone declaiming in a loud slur, "I just had one drink!"

http://imbibemagazine.com/Long-Island-Iced-Tea-Recipe

IMGP0421 copy.jpg


I once had a first date with some NFL football player wherein I met him at some restaurant's bar, and in an attempt at being thoughtful he made sure there was a Long Island Iced Tea waiting when I got there. He was shocked that I wouldn't drink it because "all the girls like these". Needless to say, there was no second date. :)


There seem to be a lot of professional sports links in your life. Not that that is a bad thing.
Cheers, Jim
no avatar
User

Jenise

Rank

FLDG Dishwasher

Posts

26724

Joined

Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm

Location

The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Jenise » Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:08 pm

James Dietz wrote:There seem to be a lot of professional sports links in your life. Not that that is a bad thing.


Really? What do you remember that I don't? Pretty sure I'd have never had any occasion to tell you about the time the visiting team's relief pitcher passed me his hotel room key through the bullpen fence once at Dodger Stadium (it went unused)--that's the only other pro sport encounter I can think of.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
User avatar
User

James Dietz

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

1248

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 7:45 pm

Location

Orange County, California

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by James Dietz » Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:46 pm

Jenise wrote:
James Dietz wrote:There seem to be a lot of professional sports links in your life. Not that that is a bad thing.


Really? What do you remember that I don't? Pretty sure I'd have never had any occasion to tell you about the time the visiting team's relief pitcher passed me his hotel room key through the bullpen fence once at Dodger Stadium (it went unused)--that's the only other pro sport encounter I can think of.


Your current residence? And maybe I should just stay mute, and let you spill the beans on your own. Indeed. Unused.
Cheers, Jim
User avatar
User

Hoke

Rank

Achieving Wine Immortality

Posts

10565

Joined

Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am

Location

Portland, OR

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Hoke » Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:55 pm

Walt, I am totally with you on the "Kangaroo". Even though I teach vodka in my classes, and will argue there are lots of differences in vodkas, I spend almost no time with vodka personally, as a matter of preference.

Why would one, since there are so many other and infinitely more interesting spirits out there? To me, vodka has always been, at base, the quintessence of drinking to get drunk. And that, oddly enough, is not why I'm drinking.

Another way of putting it: there's simply not enough reward in vodka to keep me interested.

Interesting, then, that I live with a vodka drinker. Yep, Roxi is a fan of vodka, and very picky about which vodka she likes. That's good, because all she drinks is vodka rocks and "vodka martinis"....which is your Kangaroo. I tend to think of her drinks as olive conveyors (snark snark, but she's used to it).

The one and only thoroughly interesting vodka drink that has ever intensely pleased me is, strangely enough, one I had in Las Vegas (not as good a cocktail town as one might imagine): it was at Red Square and it was a 'dirty vodka martini' made with Prince Dolgoruki Russian vodka, olive brine juice, and a bleu cheese-stuffed green olive. It was brisk and tasty and refreshing.
no avatar
User

Jenise

Rank

FLDG Dishwasher

Posts

26724

Joined

Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm

Location

The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Jenise » Sat Oct 26, 2013 9:24 pm

James Dietz wrote:
Jenise wrote:
James Dietz wrote:There seem to be a lot of professional sports links in your life. Not that that is a bad thing.


Really? What do you remember that I don't? Pretty sure I'd have never had any occasion to tell you about the time the visiting team's relief pitcher passed me his hotel room key through the bullpen fence once at Dodger Stadium (it went unused)--that's the only other pro sport encounter I can think of.


Your current residence? And maybe I should just stay mute, and let you spill the beans on your own. Indeed. Unused.


Indeed unused. Was with my husband, who was furiously jealous. And the madder Huz got, the madder the pitcher wanted to make him. Somewhat understandable, the way his team was playing there wasn't much else to amuse him. :)
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sat Oct 26, 2013 11:27 pm

Hoke wrote:Walt, I am totally with you on the "Kangaroo". Even though I teach vodka in my classes, and will argue there are lots of differences in vodkas, I spend almost no time with vodka personally, as a matter of preference.

While I recognize that one cannot experience the history of cocktails without vodka, I've drunk more in the past month as a result of this project than I have in the previous five, possibly ten years.

Why would one, since there are so many other and infinitely more interesting spirits out there? To me, vodka has always been, at base, the quintessence of drinking to get drunk. And that, oddly enough, is not why I'm drinking.

I always thought it was a shame to take a polar solvent par excellence and leave it unused. The spirit should improve the drink, in my opinion.

Yep, Roxi is a fan of vodka, and very picky about which vodka she likes. That's good, because all she drinks is vodka rocks and "vodka martinis"....which is your Kangaroo. I tend to think of her drinks as olive conveyors (snark snark, but she's used to it).

Well, nobody's perfect. :D I suppose it's only fitting that your interest in the wine world of cocktails is counterbalanced.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sun Oct 27, 2013 2:21 am

Day 18: "Piña Colada" - Imbibe says that it "shares at least some of the responsibility — or blame" for the Bahama Mama, but I think that's grossly unfair. A Piña Colada may be sweet and creamy, but at least it tastes good. All the ingredients are simpático; coconut cream, pineapple juice, and rum are like a tropical holy trinity. Regular rum is called for, but I used some vanilla-flavored rum from the Virgin Islands. I don't have cocktail cherries (my four-year-old ate them all) so I subbed morello cherries, which are excellent, though they lack the indefinite longevity of the neon type. The ingredients to Imbibe's recipe (adapted from The Essential Bartender's Guide) are: 2 oz. rum, 1 oz. each coconut and heavy cream, and one small can (6 oz.) pineapple juice. They also specify 4 oz. ice, (which is exactly 7 "moons" from your standard GE/Whirlpool icemaker) but I needed twice that to get a good blended consistency. A super powerful blender helps here, but adding just the rum and crushing it with the ice first helps if you've got an underpowered one like mine.

One of the best aspects of the Piña Colada is that it's trivial to make the base non-alcoholic and stir in the rum as desired. One of the worst aspects is that the cream and sugar can easily disguise copious amounts of subpar rum, so sip carefully!

IMGP0889.jpg
(118.6 KiB) Downloaded 1966 times

IMGP0894.jpg
(75.71 KiB) Downloaded 1966 times
Last edited by wnissen on Thu Oct 31, 2013 2:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

Hoke

Rank

Achieving Wine Immortality

Posts

10565

Joined

Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am

Location

Portland, OR

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Hoke » Sun Oct 27, 2013 1:37 pm

Looks good, Walt.

The only truly good Pina Colada I've ever had was on a tiny little pocket cove on the beach strip in Puerto Rico. I strongly suspect my enjoyment of it was as much the situation as the quality of the drink. 8)

And you're a Bahama Mama hater? I agree that about 99% of the Bahama Mamas made are pre-batched sweet crap (and use crap rum as the last insult). But I've had tweaked Bahama Mamas that were pretty tasty. For one thing, use a dark and savory rum of good quality. For another, add a little extra rum. For another, use coconut water in lieu of coconut rum (because it's difficult to find a good coconut rum). A Caribbean beach is optional but highly recommended.
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Sun Oct 27, 2013 1:46 pm

Hoke wrote:The only truly good Pina Colada I've ever had was on a tiny little pocket cove on the beach strip in Puerto Rico. I strongly suspect my enjoyment of it was as much the situation as the quality of the drink. 8)

Do you remember where? We're planning to go next year. But yes, there's a lot to be said for ambiance.

And you're a Bahama Mama hater? I agree that about 99% of the Bahama Mamas made are pre-batched sweet crap (and use crap rum as the last insult). But I've had tweaked Bahama Mamas that were pretty tasty. For one thing, use a dark and savory rum of good quality. For another, add a little extra rum. For another, use coconut water in lieu of coconut rum (because it's difficult to find a good coconut rum). A Caribbean beach is optional but highly recommended.

Coffee and lemon are two flavors that need to be in the right combinations for me to enjoy, and I don't like the way they go together at all.
Walter Nissen
User avatar
User

Hoke

Rank

Achieving Wine Immortality

Posts

10565

Joined

Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am

Location

Portland, OR

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by Hoke » Sun Oct 27, 2013 2:00 pm

Coffee and lemon are two flavors that need to be in the right combinations for me to enjoy, and I don't like the way they go together at all.


Wait, what? Am I being obtuse on this gray Sunday morning or is that a non-sequitur?

Re the PC in Puerto Rico: the Condado Plaza Hilton Hotel on the strip in Puerto Rico. This was a few years ago, and shortly after a devastating hurricane hit, but it was still way cool. They have a little tiny pocket cove with beach and rocks and a great bar and it is a superb place to laze away some time and consume Pina Coladas and Mai Tais. Suspect it's waaaay different now, but if you go to the Condado website the cove looks just the same.
User avatar
User

wnissen

Rank

Wine guru

Posts

812

Joined

Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:16 pm

Location

Livermore, CA

Re: 25 Most Influential Cocktails of the Past 100 Years

by wnissen » Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:14 am

Hoke wrote:
Coffee and lemon are two flavors that need to be in the right combinations for me to enjoy, and I don't like the way they go together at all.


Wait, what? Am I being obtuse on this gray Sunday morning or is that a non-sequitur?

Isn't it pineapple, lemon juice, coffee liqueur, and rum? Hm, that appears to be an older recipe. See this comparison: http://bahamabobsrumstyles.blogspot.com ... -mama.html

Re the PC in Puerto Rico: the Condado Plaza Hilton Hotel on the strip in Puerto Rico. This was a few years ago, and shortly after a devastating hurricane hit, but it was still way cool. They have a little tiny pocket cove with beach and rocks and a great bar and it is a superb place to laze away some time and consume Pina Coladas and Mai Tais. Suspect it's waaaay different now, but if you go to the Condado website the cove looks just the same.

Noted and filed.
Walter Nissen
PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests

Powered by phpBB ® | phpBB3 Style by KomiDesign